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HC 466 Planning and Organizing Community Health Services
Sims, Phillip L.


HC 466
Planning & Organizing Community Health Services
Phillip Sims, Instructor
Cell 204-8985
e-mail psims@elp.rr.com
14 March through 4 May 2005
Monday and Wednesday, 1940 – 2210 hours
Fort Bliss, Texas

COURSE SYLLABUS


I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Organization and management of community based and public health agencies.
Strategic planning for national, state, and local trends, community needs, and
projected changes in society and health care. Administration of personnel,
information systems, accreditation requirements, facilities, external service
contracts, community relations, and technology in clinics, home health, schools,
industry and other community based needs.

II. GOALS OF THE COURSE

The course is designed so that the student will have a better understanding of
management in health systems and agencies. New methods in manpower
utilization, information systems, personnel policies, and technical advances will
be stressed. Negotiating service contracts will be studied.

III. LEARNING OBJECTIVES

To provide a more applicable knowledge of planning and organizing in health
systems and health agencies.

IV. COURSE ARRANGEMENTS

Lecture / conference Lecture review
Paper Paper presentation
Examination (mid-term) Final examination





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V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Paper. A research paper will be required of all students. The paper will be at least
seven (7) pages long (not including the table of contents and bibliography), typed,
and double spaced. The paper will deal with a subject in relation to the course and
agreed upon between the student and the instructor.

Paper presentation. Each student will prepare a 3 to 5 minute oral presentation that
will provide an overview of the paper the student researched on a subject dealing
withhealth care planning and/or organizing in the community. These research
papers will be presented in class with specific dates and times to be discussed in
class.

VI. COURSE TEXT

Supervisory Management for Healthcare Organizations, Dunn, Rose T, R.R.A.,
McGraw-Hill publishing, 2001.

VII. Supplemental Resources

Contracts in a Nutshell, Sohaber & Rohwer, 2nd Edition, West publishing, 1984.

VIII. CLASS MEETING AND EXAMINATION SCHEDULE

3/14 Administrative announcements, explanation/discussion of the course description/
requirements, introductory comments. Chapters 1 and 2. The supervisors job.
Managerial functions and authority.

3/16 Chapters 3 and 4. Decision making. Coordinating organizational activities.

3/21 Chapters 5 and 6. Communicating. Legal aspects of the health care setting.

3/23 Chapters 7 and 8. Managerial planning. Supervisory Planning.

3/28 Chapters 9, 10, and 11. Fundamental concepts of organizing. Division of work and
departmentalization. Delegation of organizational authority.

3/30 Chapters 12. 13, and 14. Line and staff authority relationships. Organizing on the
supervisory level. Committees as an organizational tool.





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4/4 Chapters 15 and 16. Informal organizational structures. The staffing process.
Review for mid-term examination.

4/6 Mid-term examination. Chapters 1 through 16.

4/11 Chapters 17 and 18. The selection process and the employment interview.
Performance apprasials, promotions and transfers.

4/13 Chapters 19 and 20. Giving directives and managing change. Motivation.
Student presentations.

4/18 Chapters 21 and 22. Leadership. Morale. Student presentations.

4/20 Chapters 23 and 24. Positive discipline. Fundamentals of control. Student
presentations.

4/25 Chapters 25 and 26. The control process. Budgetary and other control techniques.
Student presentations.

4/27 Chapters 27 and 28. The labor union and the supervisor. Handling grievances.
Student presentations. Review for final examination.

5/2 Final examination. Chapters 17 through 28.

5/4 Review of final examination.

IX. CLASS POLICIES

Students are expected to be present at all classes and be on time. Roll will be taken
at each class meeting. Classes missed for legitimate reasons, such as illness,
temporary duty, etc. are excusable, however, the student must make up the missed
work. The student is responsible for providing the instructor with justification for an
excused absence either prior to or immediately after the absence. Two unexcused
absences are excessive and three unexcused absences will result in an involuntary
withdrawal and a grade of “F” (attendance) for the course.







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X. ACADEMIC HONESTY

Submitting someone else’s work as your own will not be tolerated. If determined by
the instructor that academic dishonesty has occurred in any part of the course, the
student(s) involved will normally be given an immediate grade of F and dropped
from the course. The second violation will result in automatic expulsion from the
school. The Assistant Vice President will be notified in writing of the action taken.

XI. GRADING POLICY

The final course grade will be determined using the following measurements:

Mid-term exam 30%
Final exam 30%
Comprehensive cases (Paper) 30%
Paper presentation 10%

The comprehensive case(paper) must be submitted on or before the night of the
review for the final examination (5/2) unless previously coordinated with the
instructor. Late papers will not be accepted and a failing grade assigned for the
paper if not submitted on time.

The following will be used to assign course letter grades:

90 - 100 A
80 - 89 B
70 - 79 C
60 - 69 D
Below 60 F (also for three or more unexcused absences)