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NS 304 Science, Technology, and Society
Greenway, Gerald W.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseNS 304 Science, Technology, and Society
SemesterS2OO05/ Spring II 2005
FacultyGreenway, Gerald W.
TitleDr. Gerald (Jerry) Greenway
Degrees/CertificatesPh.D. Food Science: Rutgers University
M.Sc. Mechanics and Materials: Rutgers University
B.S. Packaging and Marketing: Michigan State University
Office LocationN/A: Consult before class, during class breaks and after class.
Office HoursN/A: Consult before class, during class breaks and after class.
Daytime Phone---
Other Phone---
E-Mailgerald.greenway@park.edu
greenway@umr.edu
Web Pagehttp://    N/A
Semester Dates21 March - 15 May 2005
Class Days--Tuesday----
Class Time5:00 - 10:00 PM
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Volti, Rudi 2001 Society and Technological Change (4th Ed), New York, NY, Worth Publishers, ISBN: 1-57259-952-9

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
The student is encouraged to make on-line technical literature searches at the Park University library website.


Course Description:
This course examines the relationship between science, technology, and society.  Topics include: the two cultures, the relationship between basic science and technology, the effects of technology upon society, and possible future technologies.

Educational Philosophy:
The facilitator's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, internet, videos, web sites and writings. The facilitator will engage each learner in what is referred to as disputatious learning to encourage the lively exploration of ideas, issues and contradictions.

Learning Outcomes:
The student will learn the history of how science and technology caused urbanization and suburbanization, the rise of "Scientific Management", large corporations and the entertainment business, how the inventions of the automobile, the atom bomb, space ships and computers affect our life styles and attitudes, how modern medical practices interrelate with our everyday life. Other impacts of science and technology may also be included.
The course is divided into five parts:
 I.     Orientations
II.     The Process of Technological Change
III.     Technology and Transformation of Work
IV.     Communication
 V.     The Tools of Destruction
We will discover the linkages between these aspects of Science, Technology and Society

Course Assessment:
There will be a midterm and a final examination plus two written reports.

Grading:
The final grade will be determined using the following:
Mid-Term Examination                          100 points
Final Examination                             100 points
Report #1                                      60 points
Report #2                                      60 points
Daily Assignments                              75 points*
                                      TOTAL  400 points

* Five points per chapter; and 5 points if all are completed

Late Submission of Course Materials:
One letter grade will be dropped for failure to submit on the assigned due date.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Abrasive student behavior is encouraged in order to make your point during open [free-for-all] classroom discussions. I will have my cell phone in vibrator mode and request all students to do the same. Please stand up and answer your cell phone on the way out of the classroom: this also applies to me.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
A. Be prepared to discuss the assigned material for each class period. This will be achieved for each class by preparing a one page, typed report for each chapter which lists at least three major ideas of the chapter and three questions that you would like other students to answer from the assigned material: One of the THREE questions being a question selected from "Questions for Discussion" listed at the end of the assigned chapter. Answers to your questions should also be typed. Keep one copy and turn in another copy at the start of class. Please type in your name and the chapter number.

B. Present to the class, ad lib, a one to two page, typed report (Report #1) on some modern day technology. Check with the instructor first to make sure that the topic hasn't already been chosen. Discuss the technology's purpose, background and how that purpose is achieved in terms that a lay person could understand. A 5x7 card with notes/outline may be used.

C. Present to the class, ad lib, a one to two page, typed report (Report #2) on a new technology that could theoretically be invented for a particular purpose in our current society. Explain the rationale for the product, what is currently known (Background information) about a similar product: how do you think in might be built?. What are the limitations involved in developing the product and how would it apply to society today. Think BIG! as well as small in your invention. A 5x7 card can be used along with diagrams/overhead transparencies, etc.

 CLASS ACTIVITIESASSIGNMENTSTESTS/HOMEWORK
Meeting - 1
March 22
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!INTRODUCTION
CHAPTERS 1 & 2
Do homework for chaps 1 & 2 in class and get started
Meeting - 2
March 29
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTERS 3, 4 & 5
Hand in homework for chaps 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5.
Meeting - 3
April 5
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTERS 6 & 7Hand in homework for chaps 6 & 7
Meeting - 4
April 12
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTER 8Hand in homework for chap 8
MIDTERM EXAMINATION
Meeting - 5
April 19
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTERS 9 & 10Hand in homework for chaps 9 & 10
Meeting - 6
APRIL 26
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTERS 11 & 12Hand in homework for chaps 11 & 12
Meeting - 7
May 3
Participate in classroom discussions: MAKE YOUR POINTs!!!CHAPTERS 13 & 14Hand in homework for chaps 13 & 14
Meeting - 8
MAY 10
  FINAL EXAMINATION

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. <a href="http://www.park.edu/catalog">
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog</a> Page 101
There is on-line and computer software available for finding plagiarism.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.