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CJ 200 Criminology
McLendon, Jesse


COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: CJ200

COURSE TITLE: Criminology

TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT: U1J Metro Park Downtown - Summer 2005

NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Jesse L. McLendon, MPA

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Adjunct Instructor

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: Before and after class

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: (816) 274 6044 Ext 334

TELEPHONE NUMBER: (816) 454 5844 (Phone hours 8:00AM to 9:00PM CST)

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: Jesse.McLendon@park.edu

OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS: Jess-McLendon@kc.rr.com

DATES OF THE TERM: June 8, 2005 through July 27, 2005

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Wednesday

CLASS SESSION TIME: 5:30 - 9:50pm

PREREQUISITE: None

CREDIT HOURS: 3

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: An examination of the nature and extent of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the reaction to societal criminal behavior. 3:0:3

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: The instructor will serve as your facilitator and will encourage you to take responsibility for your learning processes. You will discover how to perform research for your papers and discussion topics using the World Wide Web, an extraordinary resource that is almost inexhaustible, and one that is available to you regardless of weather, holidays, or time of day.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: The course is designed to present information describing the “nature and extent of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the reaction to societal criminal behavior.” The course is designed to develop a working knowledge of nature and extent of crime and theories of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the societal reaction to criminal behavior. An overview of the basis of law as it relates to social norms and folkways. The empirical relationships of criminal behavior to demographic and sociodemographic variables will be explored.

The student will be provided with a practical view of criminology and how relates to the study of the public administration and provide a conceptual basis for the understanding relationship between criminology, criminal justice administration, and the political system and how it effects society and governmental services and programs.

Each week, we will focus on issues based on criminology, problems, etc., encountered by the professional through our discussions; these issues are reinforced and expanded in readings in our text.

After completing this course, you should:

· Know how to define crime

· Understand how much crimes “there is”

· Understand what crime trends are how to determine patterns in the crime rate

· Understand how people fall victim to crime and who is likely to become a victim

· Learn how our system of criminal law developed, and the basic elements of crimes

· Understand what criminology is

· Understand a scientific approach criminology

· Understand how social influences affect crime

· Understand the causation theories of crime

COURSE TEXTBOOK: Larry Siegel. Criminology, eighth ed. Wadsworth.

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism-the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work-sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences. The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”. An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student. Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Students are encouraged to discuss all absences with the instructor to determine the classification of the absence. Job and most family related absences are considered excused if the instructor is advised in advance. All course work must be made up within one week of the missed class. The student is only allowed two excused absences during the term and they cannot be consecutive.

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: The grade for course work that is late will be lowered one letter grade for each week the assignment is late. The assignment can be e-mailed or faxed to meet this requirement.

COURSE ASSESSMENT: The lesson plan for this course consists of class participation, weekly reading summaries, weekly discussions, and budget assignment. Class participation in discussions will be an influential component of the student’s grade. The quality and quantity of the student’s participation will be evaluated regularly the instructor, but missed work must be made up within the week. The assignment grade will be lowered one half-letter grade for each day the assignment (Weekly Reading Summary, Mid-term, Final, Research Paper) is late.

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS: The class will meet each Wednesday night at 17:30 (5:30 pm) beginning August 25, 2004 and ending October 13, 2004. During the class period selected students will be required to present a summary of the assigned readings of the week. A ten page research paper on a subject related to criminology will be required and due on the seventh week.

Week

Date

Assignments

1

6/8

Chapter 1 - Crime and Criminology
Chapter 2 - Criminal Law and Its Processes

2

6/15

Chapter 3 - The Nature and Extent of Crime
Chapter 4 - Victims and Victimization
Chapter 5 - Choice Theory
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

3

6/22

Chapter 6 - Trait Theories
Chapter 7 - Social Structure Theories Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

4

6/29

Chapter 8 - Social Theories
Chapter 9 - Conflict Theory
Chapter 10 - Integrated Theories: “Latent Trait and Development Theories”
Mid-term Examination
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

5

7/6

Chapter 11 - Violent Crimes
Chapter 12 - Property Crimes
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

6

7/13

Chapter 13 - White-Collar and Organized Crime
Chapter 14 - Public Order Crimes
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

7

7/20

Chapter 15 - Overview of the Criminal Justice System
Chapter 16 - Police and Law Enforcement
Research Paper Due
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

8

7/27

Chapter 17 - The Judicatory Process
Chapter 18 - Corrections
Final Examination Due
Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

GRADING PLAN:

Weekly Reading Summary and Presentation

25%

Weekly Discussion of Summary Presentation

25%

Research Paper

30%

Class Participation

15%

Attendance

5%

Grading Scale: I will provide you with ongoing progress reports of your average grade throughout the term. The grading scale is: A = 90 - 100; B = 80 - 89; C = 70 - 79; D = 60 - 69; F = 0 - 59.