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EN 307 Professional Writing in English Studies
Mumma, John


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseEN 307 Professional Writing in English Studies HO
SemesterFA2005
FacultyMumma, John
TitleAdjunct Professor of English
Degrees/CertificatesBA, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
MA, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
JD, John Marshall Law School, Chicago, IL
Office LocationAcademic Support Center
Office Hoursto be announced
Daytime Phone913-381-2593 (machine)
Other Phone816-584-6330 Academic Support Center
E-MailJohn.Mumma@park.edu
johnmumma@sbcglobal.net
Semester DatesAugust 22 - December 8, 2005
Class Days-M---F-
Class Time11:00 - 12:15 PM
PerquisitesEN 105, EN 106, WCT
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
There are no required texts that need to be purchased for this class.  See Additional Resources for texts on reserve in the library.  Students are responsible for acquiring a copy of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed., in some form.

Additional Resources:
Park University Electronic Databases, particularly Ebsco Academic Elite and Literature Resource Center.

Texts on Reserve in the Park University Library, Parkville Campus:

Aristotle's Poetics.  Francis Ferguson.  

Deconstruction:  Derrida.  Julian Wolfreys.

Feminist Theories of Dramatic Criticism.  Gayle Austin.

In Search of Authority:  An Introductory Guide to Literary Theory.  Stephen Bonnycastle.

Other texts may be added during the course of the semester.


Course Description:
Experience in research, writing, and editing in the professional context of contemporary work in English Studies.  English majors only.  This course fulfills the EN 306 requirements for English majors.  Pre-requisites:  EN105, EN106, passing the Writing Competency Test, and 60 credit hours.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor believes in frequent interaction between instructor and student on an individual basis, frequent drafting, revising, and proofreading of essays, and displaying respect for the nature, objectives, and established scholarly work in one's discipline.

Learning Outcomes:

As a result of successful participation in this course, students will demonstrate the ability to:

interpret works of literature using specific established methods of intepretation;

conduct a thorough review of the critical and scholarly literature available on any given literary subject;

write an intelligent paper that meets the standards of scholarly writing in the field of English;

conduct research using a variety of sources, texts, and databases;

appreciate theories of literary interpretation as academic endeavors;

demonstrate a working knowledge of literary scholars and their works on any given subject;


synthesize criticism in an effort to devise one's own theory;

demonstrate a working knowledge of literary scholars and their works on any given subject;

prepare manuscripts for specific professional literary publications.

Course Assessment:
Students will write six documented 2-3 page essays, using at least one outside critical source per paper; three essays must come from the instructor's topic list; three may be of the student's choosing with instructor approval.  A longer research paper will constitute the basis of work for the second half of the semester.   One of the shorter papers may serve as the basis for the substantial research paper.

Standards of Academic Writing in the Field of English include:

deference to the established work of others in the field;

intelligent discussion and active participation in academic dialogue;

development of a knowledgable, assertive thesis for every paper;

full development, logical organization, grammatical correctness, sophisticated writing style, and accurate and thorough MLA documentation for every paper.

Grading:
The six short essays are worth 50 points each for a total of 300 points available by midterm.  Failure to meet the attendance requirements and "minimum contacts" with instructor may result in addtional points being deducted, perhaps as much as 100 points in extreme case (see Attendance)

The longer research paper will be worth 300 points for a total of 600 points for the semester.  Students expecting an A for this paper should conduct preliminary research and submit a detailed topic proposal, write a paper that is at least 15 pages long, provide an annotated bibliography summarizing at least 25 relevant sources, use at least 12 sources in the paper itself, maintain professional literary writing standards throughout, and be turned in by the last day of class.  The minimum requirements (grade of C) are submitting a paper that is no less than eight pages long, uses no fewer than six sources, and submitting an annotated bibliography that demonstrates contact with at least 12 relevant sources.  

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Students may submit the six 2-3 page essays at a reasonable pace.  Any not turned in by Oct. 15 are late and may receive reduced credit at the instructor's discretion, substantial deduction in some cases.  The longer research paper must be turned in by Dec. 8 or severe grading penalities may be exacted.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Mature, respectful, and responsible behavior is expected at all times.  Any remarks of an insulting nature, whether those remarks are of a personal, racial, ethnic, or sexual nature, will not be tolerated.  Any classroom discussion should be pertinent rather than distracting.  Students need to demonstrate behavior that is respectful of the physical persons of classmates and instructor and the property of the university.  Instructor reserves the right to excuse from class any student for behavior he deems inappropriate under these guidelines.  Repeat offenses will result in recommendations to the Dean's office for disciplinary action.

Students are also expected to behave as "scholars."  Scholars are responsible and committed academics who give credit to others for the use of copyrighted material.  Scholars also conduct research and write with an attitude that what they do matters, that literature and criticism are important functions of the human intellect, and that respect for others in the field is a basic component of the "infrastructure" of academic activity.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
The six two to three page essays must be turned in at least twice for instructor comment and revision suggestions.  All six must receive final grades by the end of fall break (Oct 23), so the last day to turn in essays for a final grade is Oct 15.

The topic proposal for the longer research paper is due Oct. 31.  

The annotated bibliography is due November 14.

A draft in progress of the paper itself (at least eight pages and six sources used and documented) is due by November 28.  

The completed final draft is due by Dec. 8.  

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89
This course be conducted largely on an independent study basis.  For the most part, students will conference with the instructor to establish individual assignment topics, conduct research, and submit drafts of work to the instructor for comment and revision suggestions.  Students should plan to contact the instructor a minimum of twice a week via email.  These minimum contacts will constitute attendance in addtition to or substituting for actual time spent in class, so failure to meet the two email minimum will count as an absence for that week.  

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.