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CA 321 Interpersonal Conflict Solution
Hannah, Sharon E.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseCA 321 Interpersonal Conflict Solution PV
SemesterF2J2005
FacultySharon Hannah, Sandee Gamet, Diane Kyser
Office LocationCommunity Mediation Center, 500 W. Pacific, Independence, MO 64050
Office HoursAppointments should be made by phone or e-mail.
Daytime Phone816-833-4300 ext 227
Other Phone816-254-4403
E-Mailsharon.hannah@park.edu
indep_cmc@yahoo.com
Semester DatesOctober 24 to December 18, 2005
Class Days---W---
Class Time5:30 - 9:50 PM
PerquisitesNone
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
William Wilmot and Joyce Hocker.  Interpersonal Conflict. ISBN 0-07-231253-X
Marshall B. Rosenberg, Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life
ISBN 1-892005-03-4
Susan Gilmore and Patrick Fraleigh.  Style Profile for Communication at Work.
ISBN 0-938070-11-8    


Course Description:
Presents various strategies for dealing with conflict in a positive manner.  Emphasizes the development and practice of skills of listening, assertiveness, problem solving, conflict management, and mediation.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The approaches to learning we will use in this course include theory presentations, skill demonstrations, skill practice and critique.  The course involves cognitive and behavioral learning.  The course deals with the nature and theories of conflicts--what it is, how and why it occurs, conflict models and the role of power.  The course includes practice in using conflict resolution skills in various settings. Regular attendance and active participation is essential to learning and personalizing the material.

Learning Outcomes:

• Explore the impact of conflict in daily life.
• Help students understand themselves in the midst of conflict
• Learn skills for positively addressing conflicts in daily life
• Explore conflict and communication
• Learn cooperative decision-making processes.

COURSE GOALS:  Equip students to deal with conflict in daily life in healthy and productive ways.

Course Assessment:
Reading the textbooks is assumed and the attendance policy of the MetroPark Programs-Parkville Campus is followed. Assessment will be based on the following:

1. Full attendance and active participation in class. 10 points will be earned  for each class attended. Arriving late or leaving early will result in only 5 points earned each time. Requests for excused absence (which earns 5 pts.) must be submitted by e-mail no later than the completion of the missed class session.

2. First Paper: Style Profile Assessment  (3-4 pages)
This paper should include (a) your assessment scores (b) in your own words describe your style in calm and storm,  (c) how you observe your style in interactions with others in both calm & storm (give examples), (d) elements in the texts' description of your style that you DO NOT observe in yourself, and e) comment on your “storm shift” & make observations about your “excess” in storm.   DUE NOVEMBER 2, 2005

3.  Concept exams. Text reading is vital. These exams will assess student comprehension of texts and lectures. DATES: NOVEMBER 9, 23 & December 14, 2005.

4.  Second Paper: The Use of Personal Power  (3-4 pages) View one of the following films: Green Mile, The Power of One, Shawshank Redemption or War of the Roses. Analyze the use of personal power by characters in the movie including (a) evaluate whether the use of power was constructive or destructive and why, (b) name at least 2 “power currencies”
and describe how they were used, (c) describe the initial “power balance” between the characters, (d) comment on the changes in the “power balance” including what specific behaviors result in the changes.   DUE NOVEMBER 23, 2005
       
5.  Third Paper: Personal Reflection (4-5 pages)
Choose a conflict in which you are or have been personally involved. Exhibit your knowledge of the “TLC Process”: (a) comment on the use of a thought out and  intentional approach to engage the other party in addressing the conflict (include an “I” message) (b) identify the needs and interests of each party (c) describe the impact of “paraphrasing” the feeling and content of the other party's message, (d) show the use of collaboration to establish a plan for resolution.  DUE DECEMBER 7, 2005

Grading:
Assigned percentages to each course requirement:

•Full attendance and participation in class.  80 pts
•First Paper: Style Profile Assessment.  50 pts
•Three Concept Exams. 50 pts each
•Second Paper: Use of Interpersonal Power Essay.  50 pts
•Third Paper: Personal Reflection.  50 pts

Late papers are docked 1% per day they are late.

50 pts of Extra Credit can be earned by researching one organization or person (e.g. ACR, VOMA, NAFCM, The Carter Institute, The Joan Kroch Institute, John Paul Lederach, Dorothy Della Noce, Mark Umbreit, Howard Zehr) and writing a 2-3 page essay about their work with interpersonal conflict resolution. DUE  BY DECEMBER 7, 2005. (Final grades can only be improved by ONE letter grade through extra credit work.)
       
Final grades will be as follows:
Grade A = 342+ (90%)
Grade B = 304-341 (80%)
Grade C = 266-303 (70%)
Grade D = 228-265 (60%)
Grade F  = below 228 (less than 60%)

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All materials due by the final session of the course or as indicated in the syllabus.  Assignments and exams may only be “made up” for students who have excused absences on the due dates. Each week late leads to a loss of a grade point.

WeekDateTopicsAssignments
110/26Community Building: Introductions & Group Norms, Class requirements, Style Profile, Self Analysis, ContinuumWilmot/Hocker
pp. 2-30, 39-47
Rosenberg – Chap 1
211/2Definitions (Conflict Is….), Goals, Elements, Gender, Culture, Power, Come to My Side

HAND IN FIRST PAPER: STYLE  PROFILE
Wilmot/Hocker
pp. 31-37, 212-215, 217-219, Chapter 4
311/9Choices in Dealing with Conflict, Beliefs and attitudes about conflict. Attribution. “Come to My Side”. Change. Destructive vs Constructive Conflict.

FIRST CONCEPTS EXAM
Wilmot/Hocker
pp 26, 48-58, 238-249, Chapters 2 & 5
411/16Intent. Assessing Conflict. Communication. Tinker Toy Activity. TLC Model
     
HAND IN SECOND PAPER: PERSONAL POWER
Wilmot/Hocker
Chapter 2 & 6
Rosenberg: Chapters 2 & 3
511/23Feelings, Anger, Purpose Stating, I-messages, Bracketing, Paraphrasing  

SECOND CONCEPTS EXAM
Wilmot/Hocker  
pps 249-256
Rosenberg: Chapter 4,5,7 & 8
611/30Positions, Interests, & Goals. Paraphrasing
Decision-Making Process. TLC Model Practice.
               
Wilmot/Hocker
Chapter 3
Rosenberg: Chapter 6
712/7Negotiating, Mediation. Dialogue

HAND IN THIRD PAPER: REFLECTION  
Wilmot/Hocker  
Chapters 7 & 9
812/14Forgiveness and Reconciliation

THIRD CONCEPTS EXAM
Wilmot/Hocker
Chapter 10

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89
Students are expected to attend each and every schedule meeting of all courses in which they are enrolled and to be present for the full class period.  Absenteeism and tardiness, regardless of cause, are a threat to academic achievement.  Classes missed for legitimate reasons (e.g., illness, death in the family, work assignments, temporary duty) may be excused at the determination of the instructor; however, “excused” students absent from classes are responsible for all materials covered during the class period.  The student is also subject to appropriate consequences, as described by instructor in the syllabus.  A student who has two consecutive weeks of “unexcused” absences will be administratively withdrawn from class.  To comply with Federal regulations, instructors must keep a written record of attendance for every student.  An incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for the course.

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
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