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CA 322 Theory and History of Mass Media
McGinnis, Pat


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 322 Theory and History of Mass Media

Semester

S1J 2006 PV

Faculty

Pat McGinnis

Title

Assistant Professor of Communication Studies/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

J.D University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Law
M.S.E.  Mass Communications/Journalism, Central Missouri State University
B.S.E. Business, Central Missouri State University

Daytime Phone

Cell number 816-668-6906

Other Phone

Work number 816-889-2098 X 236

E-Mail

Pat.McGinnis@park.edu

patmcgkcmo@aol.com

Pat.McGinnis@mspd.mo.gov

Semester Dates

January 9-March 5

Class Days

-M-----

Class Time

5:30 - 9:50 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Two texts are required reading for this course:

Understanding Mass Communication: A Liberal Arts Perspective 7th Ed. by Melvin L. DeFleur and Everette E. Dennis.   ISBN 0-618-12857-3

Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman
ISBN 0 14 30.3653 X

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore


Course Description:
Analysis of mass media content and the role media play in modern society.   The course inclines the history of that role, functions of the media, effects on society, and the persuasive abilities of media.  This course focuses on contemporary media criticism and related ethical issues. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Example: The facilitator's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, dialogues, internet web sites, videos, and guest lecturers employed in various fields of communications. Each student will engage in the lively exploration of ideas, issues and contradictions. Examinations will test a student's critical thinking and analysis as well as the course content.

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. Define and explain how the  basic model of communications is affected by the use of media.
  2. Compare and contrast the historical theories of media influence.
  3. Discuss the significant functions of mass media in our democratic government.
  4. Analyze the benefits and pitfalls of global media and discuss role of ever changing technology in the concept of a global village.
Class Assessment:
Written examinations, discussion topics with presentation of findings, participation in class discussion.

Grading:
There will be two written examinations each worth 200 points.  These exams will be comprised of essay questions only. In order for you to have sufficient time to reflect and compose, these exams will be open book, open notes, open mind.  I will give you a handout and example of what I expect in answering essay questions.  The exams are designed to challenge your analytical skills as well as your mastery of facts.

Written exams are expected to be typed.  Spelling, grammar, and punctuation are to conform to standard English.

90-100% = A
80-89 % = B
70-79 % = C
60-69 % = D
Below 59% = F  

Late Submission of Course Materials:
There will be no make-up or early exams given.  Any genuine emergency situation will be discussed with the instruction as quickly as possible. Verification of the emergency must be in writing within the same week as the expected exam or report.  The exam or report must also be turned in within one week.  I will have final say on the sufficiency of verification.

Since many students will be composing exams by computer, please insure you have a working one with a working printer.  Exams are expected to be printed out and turned in during class.  E-mailing exams to me will be done only in an emergency...and remember I define "emergency."

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
The nature of this course invites lively and diverse expression of opinions.  Language and behavior are expected to be respectful of others despite differences of views.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
While history is sometimes reviewed in a linear way, I have rearranged the textbook chapters to insure coverage of what I feel are the most important topics.  The following chapters refer to the DeFleur/Dennis text.
Chapters marked with an asterisk (*) refer to the Postman book.

January 9
Chapter 1 Mass Communication and Mass Media
Chapter 15 Media Effects/Influence
*Introduction and foreward
*Chapter 1 The Medium is the Metaphor
*Chapter 10 Teaching is an Amusing Activity

January 16
Chapter 13 The Audience
Chapter 16 Ethics
*Chapter 2 Media as Epistemology
*Chapter 3 Typographic America
*Chapter 4 The Typographic Mind

January 23
Chapter 14 Controls: Politics/Economics
*Chapter 9 Reach out and Elect Someone
Chapter 9 International Communication
*Chapter 5 The Peek-a-boo World
Video Presentation
Exam #1 handed out

January 30
Guest lecturer
Chapter 5 Motion pictures
Chapter 10 Pop Culture
*Chapter 6 The Age of Show Business
*Chapter 7 "Now...This"
Exam #1 handed in

February 4
Chapter 2 Books
Chapter 3 Newspapers
Chapter 4 Magazines
Video presentation

February 13
Chapter 6 Radio
Chapter 7 Television
*Chapter 8 Shuffle off to Bethlehem
Video presentation

February 20
Chapter 11 Advertising
Chapter 12 Public Relations
Exam #2 handed out

February 27
Chapter 8 The New Media
*Chapter 11 The Huxleyan Warning
Exam #2 handed in


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87
Proof of academic dishonesty or plagiarism will result in an F for the course.  A career in communications demands an ethical foundation which cannot be instilled too soon.  Park University has computer programs to validate allegations of plagiarism.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

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