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NS 241 Cultural and Historical Aspects of the Scientific Endeavor
Michael, Richard


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

NS 241 Cultural and Historical Aspects of the Scientific Endeavor

Semester

S2J 2006 DN

Faculty

Michael, Richard S.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

M.S., P.E., DEE -- Board Certified Environmental Engineer

Daytime Phone

Will be provided at first night of class.

E-Mail

Richard.Michael@park.edu

Semester Dates

03/13/2006 - 05/07/2006

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:30 - 9:50 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Textbook:
Haber, Louis.  Black Pioneers of Science and Invention. An Odyssey Book, Harcourt Brace & Company, 1970

McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch, Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries, Second Edition (2001) (ISBN 0-309-07270-0)  

NOTE:  This book is available in its entirety on the Web at: http://www.nap.edu/books/0309072700/html/

Students are strongly encouraged to purchase a print version of this book, but may choose instead to read this textbook online.  However, reading large segments of the book online can be very cumbersome, and the print copy is relatively inexpensive (roughly $20).



Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
In addition to these required texts, the instructor has a limited number of  “loaner” supplemental texts:

Flowers, Charles.  A Science Odyssey.  William Morrow and Company.  New York.  Students do NOT need to purchase this book.  (A companion video tape series to this book is also available for checkout at the Park University main campus library.)


Course Description:
A history of science is presented in terms of the multicultural aspects of our scientific heritage.  Focus is upon the nature of scientific inquiry and the social factors affecting the participation of diverse groups of individuals in the advancement of science.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Students learn best in a mutually supportive, student centered classroom environment.

Learning in science is best accomplished by:

• Developing an understanding of key concepts and principles
• Then challenging students to develop their understanding and their critical thinking skills by applying those concepts and principles to critically analyzing real life issues and problems relating to science and technology.
• Minimizing rote memorization.

“Science is built up of facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.”
-Henri Poincare

"Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I learn."

-Attributed to Benjamin Franklin.  Also credited in a slightly different form as a Chinese proverb.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the nature of scientific inquiry and the scientific method;
  2. Demonstrate scientific experimentation as a problem-solving method via directed laboratory experiences;
  3. Discuss the multicultural nature of both historic and present day scientific endeavors (gained via readings and course projects);
  4. Demonstrate the use of Science Literacy, Critical Literacy, and Values Literacy via written and oral presentations.


Class Assessment:
Successful completion of this course will require that the student:

1. Attend class regularly, arrive on time and stay for the entire class period.
2. Demonstrate conduct conducive to positive academic environment.
3. Read all assignments, handouts, etc. and view all videos attentively.
4. Participate actively and thoughtfully in classroom activities, discussion and debate with reasonable frequency and competency.
5. Complete all examinations.  Exams are administered only on the date and at the time indicated in the course schedule or as announced in class.  Missing an exam will result in a grade of zero unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor.  Anything related to the course may appear on the exams.  
6. Complete all written assignments, projects, etc. as instructed and submit these on time.  In-class projects, quizzes, and exercises may not be made up.  Oral presentations need to be presented on the date scheduled.  


The course emphasizes student active, inquiry centered learning.  Lectures, when used, will include opportunity for discussion and questions.  This is not a spectator course.  “Minds-on” problem solving, issue investigations and analyses, group discussions, student presentations, instructional videos, and use of the Park computer labs (as available) for web-based inquiry will be involved.  Guest speakers and/or a field trip or trips may also be involved.  Rote memorization is minimized.  Because of the issue-centered nature of much of the course content, for many or most questions analyzed there will not be a single “right” answer.

Grading:
Course grades are based on the following:
Percent
Midterm Exam 20%
Final examination 20%
Class participation and attendance* 15%
Critical Analysis Papers* 15%
Student Classroom Presentations* 10%
Community Resource Assignment* 10%
In-class projects, exercises, quizzes, assignments 10%
TOTAL =           100%

* Please see guidelines in this syllabus and/or first night handouts

NOTE:  To accommodate classroom interaction and material coverage, it may be necessary to change the numbers of exams or papers.  If this becomes necessary, the grade weighting listed above will be changed to reflect any necessary changes.

Course grading will be as follows:

90-100%=A 80-89%=B 70-79%=C 60-69%=D Less than 60 % = F


Late Submission of Course Materials:
It is expected that all work will be done conscientiously and submitted on time.  The instructor recognizes that emergencies do occur, so if circumstances beyond your control prevent timely submission of work, please confer with the instructor.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Cell Phone and Pager Policy

Out of simple courtesy, please turn off cellular phones and beepers during class time.  If you absolutely must have these on because of family or work related responsibilities, please switch to silent, vibrating mode, and leave the classroom to answer essential calls.  

Several policies have been previously mentioned.  Active class participation by each and every student is particularly important, for individual and group learning and for individual grades.  Discussion of class topics, issues, and expressing various points of view is encouraged both inside and outside the classroom.  However, all submitted work must be your own, unless group effort is specifically authorized by the instructor.  

Writing papers together (unless specifically authorized by the instructor), copying papers or sections thereof, and other forms of plagiarism are unacceptable and may result in an “F” for the course.  

Whenever information from an outside source is used in a submitted paper or assignment, that information MUST be properly documented as to source.  This applies whether the information is quoted, paraphrased or simply used.

Unless specifically authorized by the instructor, assignments are to be typed or printed and checked for grammatical and typographical errors.   If a student is unclear about the guidelines or requirements for an assignment, please see the instructor.  

Additional information on attendance, or lack thereof, is covered under the section on grading participation.

Reference sources which are from the Internet need to be cited directly in the text of the document and on the reference list.  A hard copy of the article, information should also be submitted with the paper for all assignments.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Please note the PRE-ASSIGNMENT to be completed before our first night of class.

Week

Date

Assignments & Activities

1

March 14

Please email your contact information before the first class to:
Richard.Michael@Park.edu
Please include the following  information – Your Name, Day & Evening Telephone Contact  Numbers, Preferred email address, Major, Class Standing (Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior), What you want to gain from this class.
Class: Discussion – Chapters 1 and 2

Homework:  IMPORTANT Pre-Assignment

Please COMPLETE BEFORE First Class

Because of our ultra-accelerated eight week, eight class term, it is essential that we start quickly, and continue to work diligently throughout the term.

Please complete the following before our first class:

Read online

Land of Plenty: America's Competitive Edge in Science, Engineering, and Technology

http://www.nsf.gov/od/cawmset/report/cawmset_brochure.pdf

(Summary of the Report of the Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering and Technology Development)

Please come to our first class prepared to discuss your thoughts about the following statement:

“When any individuals, or groups – women, minorities, the physically challenged, etc.  –  are denied full equality of access to education or participation and advancement in science, engineering and, related fields, we ALL suffer the consequences!”


At your option, you may also choose to explore one or more of the following relevant web sites and related links on those pages:

http://www.astr.ua.edu/4000WS/4000WS.html

http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/women/start.htm

http://www.mills.edu/ACAD_INFO/MCS/SPERTUS/Gender/wom_and_min.html


Please also read the first two chapters in our print textbook, Black Pioneers of Science and Invention

(If for any reason you have difficulty sending emails, or are challenged at finding and accessing sources on the Internet, please do not be concerned.  We will work together to develop our basic skills at finding, accessing, and evaluating information sources on the Internet – increasingly essential skills in this “Information Age”).

2

March 21

(More detailed course schedule and class meeting schedule will be announced on the first night of class.)

3

March 28

Critical analysis paper #1 due
Options:
1. Should we have developed and dropped the atomic bomb in WWII?
2. The Tuskegee Study
3. The Digital Divide
4. Environmental Justice / Environmental Equity

4

April 4

(More detailed course schedule and class meeting schedule will be announced on the first night of class.)

5

April 11

Midterm Exam & exam related group presentations

6

April 18

(More detailed course schedule and class meeting schedule will be announced on the first night of class.)

7

April 25

Critical analysis paper #2 due.  Options to be announced in class.

8

May 2

Community Resource Project due.  Final Exam


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87
All submitted work must be your own, unless group effort is specifically authorized by the instructor.  

Writing papers together (unless specifically authorized by the instructor), copying papers or sections thereof, and other forms of plagiarism are unacceptable and may result in an “F” for the course.  

Whenever information from an outside source is used in a submitted paper or assignment, that information MUST be properly documented as to source.  This applies whether the information is quoted, paraphrased or simply used.

Unless specifically authorized by the instructor, assignments are to be typed or printed and checked for grammatical and typographical errors.   If a student is unclear about the guidelines or requirements for an assignment, please see the instructor.  

Reference sources which are from the Internet need to be cited directly in the text of the document and on the reference list.  A hard copy of the article, information should also be submitted with the paper for all assignments.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89
Additional information on attendance, or lack thereof, is covered under the section on grading participation.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

SPECIAL NOTES

This syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor. Material included is intended to provide an outline of the course and rules to which the instructor will adhere in evaluating the student's progress. However, this syllabus is not intended to be a legal contract. Questions regarding the syllabus are welcome any time.

The instructor is committed to an appreciation of diversity and to respect for the differences among the diverse individuals and diverse groups comprising our students.  

This course will help to foster a multi-cultural education in a positive, mutually supportive classroom environment that embraces our diversity.  

Directly parallel to the themes of the course, we will work together to increase our understanding and appreciation of our individualities, our commonalities, and our differences.

Acknowledgements

Appreciation is expressed to Tim Schoof, Ed.D., M.S., MBA and Margaret Monahan, R.N., M.S. for their generous permission to use and adapt materials developed by each of them, both in this syllabus and in the course.

Copyright:

This material is copyrighted and can not be reused without the express written permission of the author.