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CA 103 Public Speaking
Norris, Virgil Wayne


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 103 Public Speaking

Semester

S2T 2006 DL

Faculty

Norris, Virgil "Rusty"

Title

Sr. Instructor of Humanities/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

B.A. in Liberal Arts, Park College, 1994
Master of Liberal Arts, Baker University, 1995

Office Location

In the online classroom

Daytime Phone

816-254-1437

E-Mail

rusty.norris@park.edu

rusty.norris@sbcglobal.net

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/norris/

Semester Dates

March 13 - May 7, 2006

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Lucas, Stephen E. The Art of Public Speaking. 9th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill. 2004. ISBN: 0-07-322865-6.
Be aware that this textbook, even if purchased used, should come with 2 Student CDs. Your instructor may direct you to various files on those CDs as part of the course requirements.

Special Course Equipment and Software Requirements:
In addition to Park's Standard Tech Requirements for Online courses (see online course technical requirements at http://www.park.edu/online/requirements.asp?c=online) students will need to meet the following special requirements.
Each student must have the ability to record each of three speech presentations , in front of an audience of at least  6 adults ,.and submit their recordings for viewing by the class.
If possible, we strongly encourage you to submit your recordings as digital video files uploaded to the Doc Sharing section of your online classroom.(Digital video files may be submitted on CD in the event that problems arise with uploading. Contact your instructor for details.)  
If you can NOT record your video in a digital format, you may submit it on videotape, IF it meets the requirements below.
Videotapes must be VHS or VHS-C only; MiniDV, 8mm, or any other tape format will NOT be accepted.
Videotapes must be playable on NTSC (U.S. standard, not European/PAL formatted) video players.
Submission of videotapes in any format other than described above will result in a grade of zero for the assignment.
If you notify your instructor by MONDAY of Week 2 that you wish to submit your speeches on tape, Park University will provide you with postage-paid, Priority Mail envelopes to do so. After that deadline, you will be responsible for the costs of shipping your tape to your instructor.
Each student must be able to view RealPlayer files in order to complete various class assignments throughout the term. You can download RealPlayer for free at http://www.real.com/player/ . Please be sure to click the "Free RealPlayer" button, not the "Download Now" button. The "Download Now" button is for a 14-day free trial of a deluxe version, which you will not need for this class.

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore


Course Description:
A development of the ability to speak clearly and express ideas effectively before an audience.  Students plan, compose, and deliver various kinds of speeches and talks.   Principles of effective rhetorical presentation are related to basic purposes and forms of public speech-communication.   3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
I believe there is one thing that is absolutely essential for every functional, intelligent human being to know. They must know how to LEARN. Specifically, they must know:
1. How to acquire information from which to learn.
2. How to think critically to know what is worth learning.
3. How to organize their thoughts to make the best use of their learning.
4. How to communicate their learning to others in a clear, effective manner.

So what does this mean in terms of a formal education? It means that when a student enters my classroom, I see them as a person who brings with them a lifetime of acquired knowledge. They are not an empty vessel waiting to be filled, in fact, they are more like a full keg of aged wine waiting to be tapped, savored and enjoyed. It means the learning experience goes both ways, and makes us both richer for the encounter. It means that the student and I have entered into a contract to share what we know. And finally, it means I expect them to work as hard as I do to make the most of the experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the fundamental elements of the speech process.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the ethical standards of effective speakers.
  3. Select and narrow a topic with a particular audience/situation in mind.
  4. Design a message with a particular audience/situation in mind.
  5. Demonstrate research skills necessary to the public speaking process.
  6. When appropriate, use audio-visual resources to help the audience understand the speech.
  7. Organize ideas in a purposeful, cohesive sequence which meets audience expectations and needs.
  8. Demonstrate accurate, clear and expressive use of language, nonverbal communication, and voice.
  9. Utilize language strategies for effective oral presentations.
  10. Present convincing arguments.


Core Assessment:

The core assessment for CA103-Public Speaking will be a Final
Speech. This speech be a type of speech (persuasive or informative, for
example) already given by the student during the semester. For example,
if a student has given informative, persuasive, and demonstration
speeches during the semester, he must select one of those types of
speeches to give for the final. The rationale is that a student
increases his mastery of a type of speaking by giving that type of
speech twice. The length of the speech will be determined by the
instructor, and the topic by the instructor and/or the student.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 You will be graded on:
Weekly Discussion - 10% of course grade
Weekly Quiz - 10% of course grade
Homework Assignments - 10% of course grade
Speech 1 (Special Occasion Speech) - 15% of course grade
Speech 2 (Informative Speech) - 15% of course grade
Speech 3 (Persuasive Speech) - 20% of course grade
Proctored Final Exam - 20% of course grade

Weekly Discussion: 160 points (20 points for each week of the term). Due weekly.
To receive all 20 points for discussion in a given week, you must show appropriate participation in the online discussion including:
Responding to all parts of the discussion topic fully, understandably, and in a timely manner;
Contributing to an ongoing discussion by posting at least one significant reply to a classmate's message.
Weekly Quiz - 160 points (20 points for each week of the term). Due weekly.
Each weekly quiz will be worth 20 points total. You may retake the exam as often as you wish during the week. However, your last score will determine the number of points you receive for the week.

Homework Assignments: 160 points (20 points for each weekly assignment). Due weekly.
To receive all 20 points for an individual homework assignment, the student must:
Follow all directions for the assignment;
Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the material being addressed in the assignment;
Exemplify practices of good writing, punctuation, and grammar (where appropriate);
Clearly identify specific items being addressed;
Meet submission requirements, including deadline, location, and format.

Speech 1 (Special occasion speech): 240 points. Due (recorded and submitted) during Week 3.
Speech 2 (Informative speech): 240 points. Due (recorded and submitted) during Week 5.
Speech 3 (Persuasive speech): 320 points. Due (recorded and submitted) during Week 7.

Criteria Used for Evaluating Speeches:

The average speech (grade C) should meet the following criteria:
Conform to the kind of speech assigned -- informative, persuasive, etc.
Be submitted by the assigned date
Conform to the time limit
Have a clear specific purpose and central idea
Have an identifiable introduction, body, and conclusion
Show reasonable directness and competence in delivery
Be free of serious errors in grammar, pronunciation, and word usage
Be delivered according to the specifics of the assignment
Adhere to all recording specifications as covered in the Course Policies section of the syllabus

The above average speech (grade B) should meet the preceding criteria and also:
Deal with a challenging topic
Fulfill all major functions of a speech introduction and conclusion
Display clear organization of main points and supporting materials
Support main points with evidence that meets the test of accuracy, relevance, objectivity, and sufficiency
Exhibit proficient use of connectives -- transitions, internal previews, internal summaries, and signposts
Be delivered skillfully enough so as not to distract attention from the speaker's message

The superior speech (grade A) should meet all the preceding criteria and also:
Constitute a genuine contribution by the speaker to the knowledge or beliefs of the audience
Sustain positive interest, feeling, and/or commitment among the audience
Contain elements of vividness and special interest in the use of language
Be delivered in a fluent, polished manner that strengthens the impact of the speaker's message

The below average speech (grade D or F) is seriously deficient in the criteria required for the C speech.

Proctored Final Exam: 320 points. A final proctored examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

Other Information on proctored exams:
It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.
A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.
Failure to take a final proctored exam will result in an automatic "F" grade.

Grading:
A = 90- 100% (or 1440 points to 1600 points)
B = 80-89% (or 1280 to 1439 points)
C = 70-79% (or 1120 to 1279 points)
D = 60-69% (or 960 to 1119 points)
F = < 60% (or 959 or fewer points

Late Submission of Course Materials:
No late work will be accepted for credit. If you anticipate being absent, you may arrange with the instructor to have your work submitted in advance of the due date.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 Classroom Content
You are responsible for reading ALL of the classroom content. This includes Announcements, Lectures, Discussions, etc.. You should read all of the postings in a discussion, even though you are not required to respond to all of them. You are also responsible for checking the gradebook each week for comments that I may have included about your work on assignments. (Click on the grade to find the comments box.) You will be expected to comply with all instructions posted in the classroom.

 

Class Activities

Assignments

Week - 1

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapters 1, 4, 5, & 17.

Homework assignment posted under Week 1 in the online classroom.

Week - 2

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapters 8, 9, 10, & 12.

Homework assignment posted under Week 2 in the online classroom.

Week - 3

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapters 7, 14, & Appendix for Part 1 ("Giving Your First Speech")

Homework assignment posted under Week 3 in the online classroom.

First speaking assignment.

Week - 4

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapters 6 & 11.

Homework assignment posted under Week 4 in the online classroom.

Week - 5

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapter 15.

Homework assignment posted under Week 5 in the online classroom.

Second speaking assignment.

Week - 6

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s) and Chapter  16.

Homework assignment posted under Week 6 in the online classroom.

Week - 7

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s).

Homework assignment posted under Week 7 in the online classroom.

Third speaking assignment.

Week - 8

Weekly Discussion
Weekly Quiz

Reading: Online lecture(s).

Homework assignment posted under Week 8 in the online classroom.

Proctored final exam.


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
DETAILED REQUIREMENTS FOR RECORDING SPEECHES:





Every student must arrange to have each speech presentation recorded



before a live audience of at least six peers. Recording should begin



with the camera showing the audience, followed by the speech, and



concluding with showing the audience once again. This recording must be



continuous from start to finish; any recording with pauses or edits, or



one that fails to show the required audience will receive a zero. The



integrity of our course depends on being certain that you are



fulfilling the requirements for delivering your speeches under the



appropriate conditions.





About the audience:



It is the student's responsibility to arrange for at least 6 adults to


serve as an audience, as well as a presentation space with adequate


lighting. Some possible audience participants might include


coworkers/supervisors, local rotary/toastmaster groups, or members of


volunteer/church organizations to which you belong. If you have any


questions about the appropriateness of your audience, please contact


your instructor for guidance before recording your speech.



Before the speech:

  • check the audio to be sure the speaker is audible and clear;

  •  

  • make sure the speaker will be visible against the background and


    that the background and environment are as distraction free as


    possible.


At the beginning of the speech:

  • Have the camera operator pan the audience so all audience members are shown on tape;

  •  

  • Zoom in on the speaker so that he/she is shown from the waist to


    just a couple of inches above their head. This tight shot ensures the


    speaker is close enough for their arm movements and facial expressions


    to be clearly seen on screen.

  •  

  • During the speech:

  •  

  • Keep the camera steady and focused on the speaker, not on the


    audience. The audience should only be shown immediately before and


    immediately after the speech.


After the speech:

  • Review the recording closely. If there is no audio or if the


    audio is not understandable, the instructor will have no choice but to


    fail the speech.

  •  

  • Redo speeches that are inaudible or where the speaker is not clearly visible.

  •  

  • Remember, the evaluation of each presentation depends on what the


    instructor is able to view on the recording, not what the speaker may


    have intended. Even if your speech is wonderful, the instructor can't


    give it a good grade if they can't see it or hear it clearly.








RECORDING TIPS:


  • Review the tutorial on recording and uploading your speeches at: http://flag.park.edu/tips_movie/true_intro.htm

  •  

  • The clearer your recording is, in both audio and video, the


    better your evaluation can be. Good lighting focused on you from the


    front against a non-reflective background usually gives the best video


    picture.

  •  

  • If at all possible, make a backup copy of your speech.

  •  

  • Recordings become the property of Park University and/or the instructor and will not be returned to the student.







GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR SPEECHES:  


  • Speeches endorsing a particular viewpoint of a political issue, a


    political party, or a political candidate are not permitted. Leave that


    to the politicians.

  •  

  • Speeches endorsing a particular religion or religious belief are not permitted. This is not your place of worship.

  •  

  • Sales talks, or speeches promoting a product or service, are not permitted. This is not a commercial.

  •  

  • Be extremely cautious about the use of slang, "street talk,"


    "off-color" language, sexist language, or any other language which


    might be offensive to your audience and/or classmates. The use of


    nonstandard English is not appropriate for most situations and may


    lower your grade significantly.

  •  

  • Be cautious about becoming overly personal in your speeches.


    While relaying personal experience may be very appropriate in the


    context of certain speeches, avoid making your speech a "tell-all"


    session or an open confessional. This is not a television talk show.

  •  

  • Be judicious in your use of humor. It's fine to use humor in your


    speech, but be careful that you don't become lost in "entertaining"


    your audience when the purpose of the speech is to inform or persuade


    them.

  •  

  • Observe the specified time limits. Failing to meet the minimum


    time limit, or exceeding the maximum, will result in major point


    deductions.

  •  

  • Be sure to follow the specified format for the type of speech you are delivering.

  •  

  • Avoid merely "reading" your speech; all speeches are to be given


    extemporaneously. Verbatim reading of your speech, in and of itself,


    may reduce your speech grade by as much as two letter grades.





Rubric

Competency

Exceeds Expectation (3)

Meets Expectation (2)

Does Not Meet Expectation (1)

No Evidence (0)

Critical Thinking

Synthesis
Outcomes
 

The speech demonstrates the student's ability to synthesize information from 4+ sources.

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to synthesize information from 2-3 sources.

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to synthesize information from 1 source.

No sources are used.

Analysis
Outcomes
 

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to formulate and use creative, logical main points and convincing arguments.

The speech demonstrates the student's ability to formulate and use logical main points and arguments.

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability either to formulate and use vague or inappropriate main points or arguments.

No coherent main points or arguments are present.

Evaluation
Outcomes
 

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use unique, original materials and sources.

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use appropriate materials and sources.

The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use marginally appropriate or unclear materials and sources.

Inappropriate materials and sources are used; or, no materials or sources are used.

Content

Terminology
Outcomes
 

(In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The speech demonstrates the student's ability to effectively use advanced, professional-level vocabulary and grammar.

(In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The final speech demonstrates the student's ability to use appropriate vocabulary and grammar.

(In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The final speech demonstrates the student's ability to use vocabulary and grammar on a rudimentary level.

(In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) Grammar and vocabulary are poorly used and/or inappropriate.

Concepts
Outcomes
 

(In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into seamless, easy-to-follow introduction, body, and conclusion.

(In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into clear introduction, body, and conclusion.

(In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into rudimentary (but difficult to follow) introduction, body, and conclusion.

(In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). No clear introduction, body, and conclusion are present.

Application
Outcomes
 

The speech demonstrates the  student's to effectively apply principles of good public speaking, including consistent eye contact with all audience members and having no distractors (un, uh, like).

The speech demonstrates the  student's to effectively apply principles of good public speaking, including consistent eye contact and using few distractors (un, uh, like).

The speech demonstrates the student's to sporadically apply principles of good public speaking. Eye contact is inconsistent, and many distractors (un, uh, like) are present.

Eye contact is non-existent, and distractors (un, uh, like) are common.

Technical Skills

Whole Artifact
Outcomes
 

The speech demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content professionally. Organization is clear and clever, and delivery is energetic and engages audience.

The speech demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content. Organization is clear, and delivery engages audience.

The speech usually demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content. Organization is usually clear, and delivery sometimes engages the audience.

Content is not audience appropriate. Speech is either disorganized, and/or the delivery leaves audience bored, confused, or both.

Component
Outcomes
 

Components of the speech demonstrate the student's ability to effectively present and explain well-researched materials and to present convincing, logical arguments.

Components of the speech demonstrate the student's ability to effectively present well-researched materials and logical arguments.

Components of the speech demonstrate the student's ability to present researched materials, although the research is superficial. Arguments are present, but are marginally logical.

No research is done. Arguments are illogical and never convincing.

M/LL Courses
Outcomes
 

 

 

 

 

Copyright:

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