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CS 360 Database Management
DeWispelare, Aaron R.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CS 360 Database Management

Semester

S2T 2006 DL

Faculty

DeWispelare, Aaron R.

Title

Professor of Computer Science/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

Ph. D., Systems Engineering, University of Virginia
M.S.,  Systems Engineering, Air Force Institiute of Technology
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, B.S. Electrical Engineering, M.B.A.

Office Location

San Antonio, TX

Office Hours

8:00 - 5:00 M-F

Daytime Phone

210-522-6072

E-Mail

a.dewispelare@pirate.park.edu

adewisp@gvtc.com

Semester Dates

Mar 13 - May 7, 2006

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

CS219

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Modern Database Management, Seventh Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
Author: Hoffer, Jeffrey A., Prescott, Mary B., McFadden, Fred R.,
ISBN: 0-13-145320-3.
Text Ordering: Order Texts at: http://direct.mbsbooks.com/park.htm

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
Author's Pine Valley Data Set
Publisher's Text Web Site
Databasing Journal
Database Fundamentals
SQL Basics (Lessons 1,2,3)
Data Warehouse and On Line Analytical Processing

http://parkonline.org/ec/Courses/14774/CRS-PARK-2171990/PineValley_DataSet.zip
http://myphlip.pearsoncmg.com/bridgepage/index.cfm?vbridgeid=32
http://www.research.microsoft.com/research/db/debull/
http://www.databasejournal.com/sqletc/article.php/1428721
http://www.sqlcourse.com/
http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~mendel/dwbib.html

Course Description:
This course provides an overview of database system concepts.  The course  deals with file organization methods, database models, data integrity and  security, and database administration issues.  The student will be introduced  to application program development in a database environment with  emphasis on setting up, modifying, and querying a database.  Prerequisite:  CS219. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Welcome to Database Management  (CS 360) on-line! This course focuses on one of the hottest topics in the computer technology area today, the repositing and utilization of data, the fuel of the information economy and age. This ubiquitous technology is pervasive in the world today in virtually some part of every business activity, on-line encounter, and computer development effort.  This course is intended to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the concepts involved in database development, data modeling, database design, and implementation. The student will also be exposed to concepts involved in the operations and maintenance of a database including client server database architectures, processing standards, and data administration. The relational model will be used as the main structural data model accompanied by an introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL).

Each week we will focus on the various aspects of database technology from the basic terms of the discipline, through data modeling, to the concepts utilized in the physical design and implementation of a database. The course will be conducted through a combination of reading assignments, with associated topical weekly discussion questions which are posted on the appropriate public discussion threads, weekly homework assignments and weekly internet research assignments which are submitted to the appropriate private drop boxes, and a proctored comprehensive final exam. This course will build on the global and multinational aspects of databasing including the international nature and accessibility of information, and the de facto standardization of technology both for a vendor provided database management system (DBMS) and language, the structured query language (SQL).

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe a relational database and object-oriented database.
  2. Describe components of a database management system and the techniques used to store and access data within the DBMS.
  3. Utilize modeling software to build a database design.
  4. Describe normalization and perform normalization of a database model.
  5. Demonstrate the basic fundamentals of Structured Query Language (SQL).
  6. Use SQL to create the tables within a database and queries for updating tables.
  7. Utilize SQL to build queries to extract data from multiple tables based on selection criteria.
  8. Describe the duties of the database administrator.
  9. Describe the creation and use of metadata and data dictionaries.
  10. Examine issues of implementing an enterprise database or other DBMS solution such as concurrency, efficiency, management of and security.
  11. Explain the role and issues surrounding the management of data such as efficiency, privacy, security, ethical responsibility, and strategic advantage.
  12. Describe the role of web-enabling databases.


Class Assessment:
Evaluation Criteria for Grading

Weekly Activities to Submit Via Dropbox

1.0 Questions. To earn full credit, each submission must –
1.1 Address all aspects/parts of the question(s).
1.2 Show a thorough understanding of question(s) posed in your answer/position.
1.3 Exhibit critical thinking and analytical skills in supporting your answer/position.
2.0 In answering the question(s), ensure you follow guidelines stated in the question(s).
2.1 Answer/position should be about 200 words in length.
2.2 Formatting must conform to APA style.
2.3 All answers/positions must be supported by appropriate academic references (worth 20 -25% of each activity). See the course FAQs on how to properly cite and complete citations from various sources including the text book and the student's own personal experiences.
2.4 Use American Standard English with correct grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.
3.0 Activities must be submitted via Dropbox.
3.1 Activities must be submitted as an attachment to the Dropbox in MS Word, and the student must identify themselves by name on each sheet of any attachment.
3.2 Activities must be submitted on due date or late penalty will be imposed (25% penalty for each day late).
1.0 Internet Research. To earn full credit, each submission must –
1.1 Address all aspects/parts of the internet research exercise.
1.2 Show a thorough understanding of internet research exercise in your answer/position.
1.3 Exhibit critical thinking and analytical skills in supporting your answer/position.
2.0 In responding to the internet research exercise, ensure you follow guidelines stated in the internet research exercise.
2.1 Answer/position should be about 200 words in length.
2.2 Formatting must conform to APA style.
2.3 All answers/positions must be supported by appropriate academic references (worth 20 -25% of each activity). See the course FAQs on how to properly cite and complete citations from various sources including the text book and the student's own personal experiences.
2.4 Use American Standard English with correct grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.
3.0 Activities must be submitted via Dropbox.
3.1 Activities must be submitted as an attachment to the Dropbox in MS Word, and the student must identify themselves by name on each sheet of any attachment.
3.2 Activities must be submitted on due date or late penalty will be imposed (25% penalty for each day late).
1.0 Homework. To earn full credit, each submission must –
1.1 Address all aspects/parts of the homework problems.
1.2 Show a thorough understanding of homework problems in your answers.
1.3 Exhibit critical thinking and analytical skills in supporting your answers.
2.0 In responding to the homework problems, ensure you follow guidelines stated in the homework problems.
2.1 Answers should include appropriate diagrams as stated in the problems.
2.2 All answers must be supported by appropriate academic references (worth 20 -25% of each activity) including those for the homework problems from the text book. See the course FAQs on how to properly cite and complete citations from various sources including the text book and the student's own personal experiences.
2.3 Use American Standard English with correct grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.
3.0 Homework problems must be submitted via Dropbox or fax for hand drawn diagrams.
3.1 Homework problems must be submitted as an attachment to the Dropbox in MS Word or faxed for hand drawn diagrams, and the student must identify themselves by name on each sheet of any attachment or fax.
3.2 Homework problems must be submitted on due date or late penalty will be imposed (25% penalty for each day late).

Weekly Discussion Participation

1.0 Discussion. To earn full credit, a discussion topic, issue, or question  which you discuss must –
1.1 Respond directly to all parts of the discussion topic, issue, or question. You can respond independently, or piggy back off another student's comments, but you must address all parts of the discussion topic yourself.  
2.0 Clearly and concisely summarize your answer/position.
2.1 Demonstrate critical thinking, be logical, and support arguments with evidence. All answers/positions must be supported by appropriate academic references (worth 20 -25% of each activity). See the course FAQs on how to properly cite and complete citations from various sources including the text book and the student's own personal experiences.
3.0 Be approximately 200 in length.
3.1 Post to the Discussion Forum by the due date or late penalty will be imposed (25% penalty for each day late).
3.2 Use American Standard English with correct grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling.
4.0 I typically will infrequently join the discussions so as not to intimidate or otherwise bias or constrain the flow of the discussions until toward the end of the discussion or in weekly feedback to the students.

Grading:
Overall Course Grading

The exam will count 25% of your total grade. You will know in advance the standards for each assignment. My goal is to give you prompt, clear, and useful feedback to help you become a better writer and thinker. You will be able to track your average exactly throughout the course. Each student is responsible for:
Completing Weekly Reading Assignments .
Completing Weekly assigned Activities (Questions, Internet Research, and Homework), and submitting them to the instructor.
Participating in the weekly on-line Discussion.
Completing a Final Proctored Examination.
Assignments % of Grade

Weekly Tasks (8) 75%
(100 points each for the first 7 weeks and 50 points for week 8)

(Weekly Tasks consist of Discussion Participation and weekly Activities [Internet Research, Questions, and Homework Problems])

Proctored Final Examination (250 points) 25%
Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found at the Park University Web Site. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first weeks of class so that you can send your requested proctor to me for approval. Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.  

Course Grading Scale - the total of all points received (total of all weekly assignments and final exam) will determine the student's letter grade as follows:

A =  90- 100%  
B = 80-89%  
C =  70-79%  
D = 60-69%  
F = < 60%  

Submission of Late Work: There is a late submission penalty of 25% of the assignment value for each day late - see the course FAQs for more information on this policy.

Make-up Work: Because solutions to most of the assignments are published weekly along with submission critiques in order to provide rapid feedback, the nature of this course does not lend itself to any make-up work.

Proctored final examination - A computerized examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Web Site.

Other Information on proctored exams:

It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 4th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.
A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.
Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Any assignment turned in after the due date is penalized 25% for each day late (this is measured by when I can access your product electronically, readable and properly formatted). Example: say you earned 80% on an assignment, but turned it in one day late. Your score would only be 60% since you are penalized for being late (25% of 80 points = 20 points, and 80 points - 20 points = 60 points). After an assignment is late over four days, no points would be left due to the late penalty, so it does no good to submit the assignment in this situation instead focus on any remaining assignments. Why do I do this? Because it is the only way to administer a course like this with such as short duration adhering to the University rules for the rapid feedback and posting of solutions so that the class can stay on schedule. If schedule is going to be a problem due to work or personal situations, contact me to get permission to complete your assignments early to avoid a late penalty.

Here is a key point regarding this class: Absolutely NO INCOMPLETES are allowed unless there is documented proof of a medical emergency. I DO NOT provide any sort of "make-up" or "additional assignments" for missed work or poor performance, so keep up with the course and give every assignment your best. I do not accept late work without a penalty; so if schedule is going to be a problem due to work or personal situations, get permission to complete your assignments early. If you suspect you will be unable to complete the course-work, drop the class before the drop period expires.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Professors are required to keep attendance records and report absences throughout the term. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands including temporary duty. The student is responsible for completing all assigned work.  Any student failing to attend class for two consecutive weeks, without an approved excuse from their instructor, will be administratively withdrawn and notified via email that you have been withdrawn and a grade of "WH" will be recorded.

An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term.  PLEASE NOTE:  Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation.  Participation grades will be assigned by each individual instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

For more details on Park University on page 100 of the Park University Undergraduate Catalog or page 14 of the Park University Graduate Catalog.

Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time online and offline each week including but not limited to responding to the weekly conference discussions, sending/receiving Email, reading and viewing online lectures, completing online quizzes and tests, and conducting research over the World Wide Web.  A rule of thumb is that you should spend a minimum of approximately 4-5 hours per week online reviewing course content, and engaging in the conference discussion and an additional 4-6 hours per week on readings, preparing assignments, or examinations.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Course Curriculum Map Core Learning Outcomes Addressed each Week
Week 1 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapters 1, 2 and 9 (pp. 375-384) Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 1, we begin with an overview of the course covering the content and administration of the course. Database concepts and terms are introduced, as well as a brief history of database models used over the last 30 years. In Chapter 2, we briefly cover the steps taken in a database development and compare them with the steps for a typical software development effort. We see our first database application at the end of Chapter 2, which includes examples of Query By Example (QBE). Chapter 9 (pp.375-384) provides a detailed look at Query By Example (QBE) as a GUI based interface to a relational database. The use of MS Access in a detailed example show the utility of this approach to ad hoc querying for a vendor produced DBMS. 1. Describe the conceptual basis for databases vs. files.
2. Describe the database development lifecycle.
3. Describe Query By Example (QBE) as it compares to command line querying.  
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 1. Activities (Text: Read Chapters 1, 2 and 9 (pp. 375-384), Questions on data and information)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #1 (Chapters 1, 2 and 9). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 1, 2 and 9).
Discussion: Week 1 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 2 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapters 3, 4, and Appendix A. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 2, we'll introduce data modeling constructs by investigating both the Entity-Relation (E-R) model (for a general database application) in Chapter 3, and the Enhanced Entity-Relationship (EER) model which provides for supertype and subtype entities to help simplify many data models with similar attributes in Chapter 4. We will see that E-R diagrams provide for an efficient graphical tool to document a database data model. Examples of notation conventions and their presentation in common software tools are illustrated in Appendix A. The concept of 'business rules' in the context of database applications is presented in both Chapters 3 and 4. to ad hoc querying for a vendor produced DBMS. 1. Describe the conceptual basis for logical database modeling.
2. Describe and demonstrate Entity-Relation (E-R) modeling.
3. Describe and demonstrate Enhanced Entity-Relation (EER) modeling.  
4. Describe the role “business rules” play in logical data modeling.

Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 2. Activities (Text: Read Chapters 3, 4, and Appendix A), Homework set #1)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #2 (Chapters 3, 4, and Appendix A). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 3, and 4)
Discussion: Week 2 Discussion Topic thread.

Week 3 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapter 5. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 3, Chapter 5 provides the basis of completing the logical data model by transitioning the E-R model to a relational model through the normalization process. Normalization is explored in detail to promote understanding of the relational database model. 1. Describe the conceptual basis for normalization of a database.
2. Describe and demonstrate converting an E-R model to relations for a relational model.
3. Describe and demonstrate normalization to the third level for a logical data model.  
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 3. Activities (Text: Read Chapter 5 - normalization), Homework set #2)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #3 (Chapter 5 - normalization). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapter 5 - normalization)
Discussion: Week 3 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 4 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapters 7 and 8. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 4, Chapters 7 and 8 introduce the Structural Query Language (SQL) as the direct database interface for relational databases. The data definition language (DDL) and data control language (DCL) are introduced, and the data manipulation language (DML) is explored in more detail so that the student is conversant in querying in SQL. Chapter 8 ends with a discussion of useful current and proposed programming constructs like triggers and procedures, and illustrates ways SQL can be integrated with other programming languages. 1. Describe the constituent parts of Structural Query Language (SQL).
2. Describe and demonstrate the use of the data manipulation language (DML) part of SQL.
3. Describe the concept of and use of procedures and triggers.  
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 4. Activities (Text: Read Chapters 7, and 8), Homework set #3)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #4 (Chapters 7 and 8). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 7 and 8).
Discussion: Week 4 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 5 Assigned Readings: Text: Chapters 6, 9 (except 375-384), 10, and 13. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 5, we shift from logical modeling involving data and its structure constrained by business rules to physical modeling where we focus on how we will implement the database. In Chapter 6, look at providing estimates of permanent and random access memory sizes, and estimates of performance response times for typical database activities. We also discuss ways of increasing response time performance. Chapter 9 continues physical database design by considering the network environment in which the database will be implemented. The first consideration here is the type of architecture (i.e. client/server) in which to host the database. Various client/server architectures are examined ranging from file servers to the popular two and three tier designs. Chapter 9 ends with a discussion of popular application interfaces for databases. Chapter 10 discusses the web based popular alternative to the client/server architectures of Chapter 9 for hosting databases. Issues, such as security, and applications examples are provided for the internet environment associated with databases. Chapter 13 continues exploring the database network environment design by covering the aspect of distributed databases. The advantages gained by partitioning the tables in a large relational database are weighed against the networked complexity of data synchronization. Topics of data integrity, quality, concurrence, replication, committing changes, and back-up are introduced. 1. Describe the steps and considerations involved in physical database modeling.
2. Describe the functions of each tier in an n-tier client server system.
3. Describe the functions of each layer in a web based database system.
4. Describe the pros and cons of the various centralized and distributed database architectures.
5. Describe the types of data security and disaster recover schemes  which are popular today.
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 5. Activities (Text: Chapters 6, 9 (except 375-384), 10, and 13, Internet Research on distributed databases)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #5 (Chapters 6, 9 (except 375-384), 10, and 13). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 6, 9 (except 375-384), 10, and 13)
Discussion: Week 5 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 6 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapters 11 and 12. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 6, Chapter 12 examines the function of data stewardship and its two components, data administration (DA) and database administration (DBA). The programmatic tasks associated with designing and maintaining a database such as determining requirements for data security, privileges of uses, data update timing, back-up schedules, etc. are appropriately handled by a data user representative, the data administrator. The DBMS tasks associated with implementing and operating a database such as installing a DBMS, upgrading software, loading/importing data, implementing security policy, performing back-ups, etc. are appropriately performed by a DBA. Additionally, the topics of database deadlocking, and recovery are covered. Chapter 11 examines the newest databasing concept, data warehousing. The need for this structure, and its attendant advantages are covered in exploring the star schema architecture. We continue the discussion of data warehousing by introducing the concept of data marts, and exploring the topics of data cleansing and reconciliation, and data mining and visualization. 1. Describe the various database responsibilities and activities that data administrators and data base administrators are ideally involved in.
2. Describe the purpose of a data warehouse, and the differences between it and a typical transaction-processing database.
3. Describe the popular schemas for modern data warehouses.
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 6. Activities (Text: Read Chapters 11 and 12), Questions on Data Administration and Database Administration)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #6 (Chapters 11 and 12). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 11 and 12)
Discussion: Week 6 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 7 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Chapters 14 and 15. Weekly Overview/Objectives: During Week 7, Chapter 14 introduces the database model of the future, the object-oriented (OO) model. We compare the OO model with models covered earlier in course. We use the material in Chapter 15 to provide examples of an OO database. 1. Describe the conceptual basis for object-oriented databases.
2. Describe differences and similarities between object-oriented and relational databases.
Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 7. Activities (Text: Read Chapters 14 and 15), Internet Research on Object Oriented Databases)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #7 (Chapters 14 and 15). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Chapters 14 and 15)
Discussion: Week 7 Discussion Topic thread.


Week 8 Assigned Readings: Text: Read Appendix D. Weekly Overview/Objectives: Appendix D introduces the Object-Relational database as a hybrid for those implementations needing operational characteristics of both types of databases. The student will take a timed and proctored final exam. It is the student's responsibility to schedule the proctored exam with the appropriate official proctor, and the student is encouraged to do so at the earliest opportunity. This will be a timed closed book and closed notes comprehensive proctored exam covering all material covered in the course. 1. Describe the significance and solutions to the “impedance mismatch” encountered in many object-oriented developments that utilize a relational database.  2. Describe the design and utility of object-relational databases.

Activities/Homework; Homework set – week 8. Activities (Text: Read Appendix D), Questions on hierarchical, relational, and object-oriented database models)
Presentation/Lecture: Lecture #8 (Appendix D). Lecture: Online Lecturette #1 (highlights of Appendix D)
Discussion: Week 8 Discussion Topic thread.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

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