Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

ED 585 Emergent Literacy in a Diverse Society I
Wilson, Catherine


COURSE NUMBER: ED585

COURSE TITLE: Emergent Literacy in a Diverse Society I

TERM:  Fall I  2005

FACULTY MEMBER: Dr. Catherine Wilson

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Associate Professor

FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION:  Copley 320

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: M-F 9:00-10:30; T-TH-9-10:00; W 1-2:00

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: 816-584-6342

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: catherinew@mail.park.edu

DATES OF THE TERM:  August 22-October 14

CLASS WEEKS DAYS: Tuesday

CLASS WEEK TIME: 5:00-9:30

PREREQUISITE(S): none

CREDIT HOURS: 3hrs.

 

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

                     

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The first course in a two-course sequence that examines literacy development (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in young children and explores the implications for teaching practices (birth-grade 3).  This course focuses on the socio-cultural contexts of childhood literacy, including the social worlds of the home, the community, and the classroom.

 

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:

Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism. 

 

COURSE GOALS:

Current educational policy in the United States places extraordinary pressures on teachers, children, and families to ensure that all children become proficient readers and writers by the third grade.  The contemporary context of prescribed teaching practices and high-stakes assessment renews the need for teachers to 1) closely examine the multiple contexts for literacy development, including homes, communities, and classrooms; 2) investigate multiple pathways to literacy; and 3) develop strategies for identifying and building upon each child’s strengths. This course provides the opportunity to examine research on different community contexts for literacy development; create strategies for learning from and with children and their families; and refine skills as advocates for literacy environments that support all children and families.

                                 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:  Learners will be able to:

·   examine and apply research on families and communities as contexts for literacy development. (NAEYC Standards  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Professional Tools 1, 4, 5, 7 . Assessment: Inquiry Project Researching Funds of Knowledge)

·   analyze and apply the finding of studies of childhood literacy to teaching practice. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5   Professional Tools  6.  Assessment: Inquiry Project: Literacy Biography and Researching Funds of Knowledge)

·   conduct in-depth literacy profiles of children. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5   Professional Tools  6. Assessment: Inquiry Project Literacy Biography and Researching Funds of Knowledge)

·   identify the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that families provide for their children’s learning. (NAEYC Standards  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Professional Tools 1, 4, 5, 7.Assessment: Inquiry Project Researching Funds of Knowledge)

·   advocate for literacy environments and experiences that help children and families see themselves as capable, competent, engaged members of  literacy communities. (NAEYC Standard 5 Professional Tools 8, 9. Assessment: Inquiry Project Communicating with Others)

 

COURSE READINGS:

Texts: 

Clay, M. M. (1998).  By different paths to common outcomes.  York:ME.  Stenhouse.

 

Owocki, G., & Goodman, Y.  (2002).  Kidwatching: Documenting children’s literacy development.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.  (To be consulted throughout the 8-weeks)

 

Readings:

Anning, A. (2003).  Pathways to the Graphicacy Club: The crossroad of home and preschool.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 3, 5-35

              

Brooker, L. (2002).  ‘Five on the first of December!’: What can we learn from case studies of early childhood literacy?  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 2, 291-313.

 

Duke, N. K. (2000).  For the rich, it’s richer: Print experiences and environments offered to children in very low- and very high –socio-economic status first-grade classrooms.  American Educational Researcher Journal, 37,  441-478.

 

Durante, A., Ochs, E., & Ta’ase, E. K. (2004).  Change and tradition in literacy instruction in a Samoan American community.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 159-170.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

 

Gregory, E., Long, S., & Volk, D. (2004).  A sociocultural approach to learning.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 6-20.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

 

Haight, W. L., & Carter-Black, J. (2004).  His eye on the sparrow: Teaching and learning in an African-American church.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 195-20.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

 

Handell, R. D., & Goldsmith, E. (1994).  Family reading-still got it: Adults as learners, literacy resources, and actors in the world.  In D. K. Dickinson (Ed.). Bridges to literacy: Children, families and schools (pp. 150-174).  Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

 

Kendrick, M., & McKay, R. (2004).  Drawings as an alternative way of understanding young children’s constructions of literacy.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 109-128.

 

McNaughton, S. (2001).  Co-constructing expertise: the development of parents’ and teachers’ ideas about literacy practices and the transition to school.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 40-58.

Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992).  Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom.  Theory into practice, 31, 132-41.

 

Neuman, S. B. (1999).  Books make a difference: A study of access to literacy.  Reading Research Quarterly, 34.

 

Tabors, P. O., Beals, D. E., & Weizman, Z. O. (2001).  “You know what oxygen is?”: Learning new word at home.  In D. K. Dickenson,  &  P. O. Tabors, (Eds.). pp.93-110.  Beginning literacy with language: Young children learning at home and school.  Brookes Publishing.

 

Taylor, D. (Ed.) Many families, many literacies: An international declaration of principles.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (selected writings)

 

Volk, D., & de Acosta, M. (2001).  ‘Many differing ladders, many ways to climb…’: Literacy events in the bilingual classroom, homes, and community of three Puerto Rican kindergartners.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 193-224

 

Wollman-Bonilla, J. E. (2001).  Family involvement in early writing instruction.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 167-192.

 

 

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT:

Inquiry Project:  Due Week 8

Part I. Literacy Biography.  Identify a child and conduct a 5-week in-depth study of the child’s literacy capabilities.  Based upon your research, and the course readings, create a richly descriptive portrait of the child.  The purpose of the literacy biography is to develop a well-informed understanding of the child as a member of her literacy communities – home, community, and school (both formal and informal aspects of the school environment). Finding will be reported weekly to your research group.  NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5   Professional Tools  6.

 

Part II. Researching “Funds of Knowledge”.  Using Luis Moll’s research on “hidden family resources,” conduct a mini-ethnography to discover the home and community resources of the child. Findings will be reported weekly to the class so that the group can develop deep understandings of the multiple kinds of knowledge and skills that families provide for their child’s learning and literacy development.  The final written presentation of research should include a reflection on your learnings from this project and the implications for your teaching.  NAEYC Standards  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Professional Tools 1, 4, 5, 7 

 

Part III. Communicating Your Findings.  Develop a plan for sharing your findings with others, including families and colleagues.  NAEYC Standard 5 Professional Tools 8, 9.

 

Rubrics will be developed in class.

 

GRADING PLAN:

Inquiry Project:

100-90 = A 

Most work is in the “accomplished” range.   (no more than two areas “developing”)

 

80-79 = B

Most work is in the “developing” range.  (no more than two areas “beginning”)

 

79-60 = C

Most work in the “beginning” range. 

 

Attendance and Participation:

Only one absence is excused in the 8-week graduate sessions.  More than one absence, and late arrivals or departures will influence your final evaluation. 

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:  Work must be turned in on time to receive full credit.

 

EXPECTATIONS:

Please reserve Tuesday evening for this class meeting, and arrange your day so that you are able to arrive at 5:00 and remain until 9:30.  We will begin class promptly at 5:00, take breaks to keep our minds fresh, and plan for a variety of learning opportunities, including small group research work and large group conversations about class readings.  You will be responsible for leading discussion on the readings, so be prepared to guide your colleagues through an in-depth examination of the content of each week’s readings, as well as make connections to readings from earlier class session.   This will mean that everyone needs to be well-prepared by carefully reading the selections for the week.

 

Please turn off all cell phones and reserve phone calls for breaks.

 

Topic

Date

Assignments

Week 1: Making Meaning: Conceptualizing Literacy

 

8/23

Readings: 

 

           Clay, M. M. (1998).  By different paths to common outcomes.    York:ME.  Stenhouse.    Introduction and Chapters 1-2

 

Anning, A. (2003).  Pathways to the Graphicacy Club: The crossroad of home and preschool.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 3, 5-35

 

Whitmore, K. F., Martens, P., Goodman, Y. M., Owocki, G. (2004).  Critical lessons from the transactional perspective on early literacy research.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 291-325.

             

           

Week 2: Families and Communities As Contexts of Literacy Development

 

8/30

Readings:

            Gregory, E., Long, S., & Volk, D. (2004).  A sociocultural approach to learning.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 6-20.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

           

            McNaughton, S. (2001).  Co-constructing expertise: the development of parents’ and teachers’ ideas about literacy practices and the transition to school.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 40-58.

            Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992).  Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom.  Theory into practice, 31, 132-41.

 

Week 3: From the Child’s Perspective.

 

How Children Represent Their Knowledge.

 

9/6

Readings:

           Clay, M. M. (1998).  By different paths to common outcomes.    York:ME.  Stenhouse.    Chapters 3-4

                      

           Kendrick, M., & McKay, R. (2004).  Drawings as an alternative way of understanding young children’s constructions of literacy.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 109-128.

 

    

 

 

     

Week 4: Communities As Contexts of Literacy Development: Language and Culture

 

9/13

Readings:

            Haight, W. L., & Carter-Black, J. (2004).  His eye on the sparrow: Teaching and learning in an African-American church.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 195-20.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

 

           Volk, D., & de Acosta, M. (2001).  ‘Many differing ladders,  many ways to climb…’: Literacy events in the bilingual classroom, homes, and community of three Puerto Rican kindergartners.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 193-224.

           

Week 5:

Communities As Contexts of Literacy Development: Language and Culture

 

9/20

Readings:         

           Brooker, L. (2002).  ‘Five on the first of December!’: What  can we learn from case studies of early childhood literacy?  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 2, 291-313.

 

           Durante, A., Ochs, E., & Ta’ase, E. K. (2004).  Change and tradition in literacy instruction in a Samoan American community.  In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.)  pp. 159-170.  Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities.  NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

 

Week 6:

Families as Partners

 

9/27

Readings:

           Tabors, P. O., Beals, D. E., & Weizman, Z. O. (2001).  “You know what oxygen is?”: Learning new word at home.  In D. K. Dickenson,  &  P. O. Tabors, (Eds.). pp.93-110.  Beginning literacy with language: Young children learning at home and school.  Brookes Publishing.

 

           Wollman-Bonilla, J. E. (2001).  Family involvement in early writing instruction.  Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 167-192.

 

Week 7:

Families as Partners

 

10/4

Readings:

           Handell, R. D., & Goldsmith, E. (1994).  Family reading-still got it: Adults as learners, literacy resources, and actors in the world.  In D. K. Dickinson (Ed.) Bridges to literacy: Children, families and schools (pp. 150-174).  Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

 

            Taylor, D. (Ed.) Many families, many literacies: An international declaration of principles.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (selected writings) 

 

Week 8:

Access to literacy experiences and materials

 

10/11

Readings:

           Duke, N. K. (2000).  For the rich, it’s richer: Print experiences and environments offered to children in very low- and very high–socio-economic status first-grade classrooms.  American Educational Researcher Journal, 37,  441-478.

 

Neuman, S. B. (1999).  Books make a difference: A study of access to literacy.  Reading Research Quarterly, 34.

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community.  Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.” Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

 

PLAGIARISM: “Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another’s idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.”  Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences.  The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment.  Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.  In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

 

COPYRIGHT NOTIFICATION: This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.