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EDC 353 Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood
Wilson, Catherine


COURSE NUMBER: ED 353

COURSE TITLE: Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood

TERM:  Fall 2005

FACULTY MEMBER: Catherine Wilson

TITLE:  Associate Professor of Education

OFFICE LOCATION: Copley

OFFICE HOURS: M-F 9:00-10:30; T-TH-9-10:00; W 1-2:00

OFFICE TELEPHONE: 816-584-6342

EMAIL ADDRESS:  catherinew@mail.park.edu

FACULTY WEB PAGE ADDRESS:

DATES OF THE TERM:  August 22-December 16

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: M-F

CLASS SESSION TIME: 11:00-12:15

PREREQUISITE(S):  Admission to the School for Education (or permission of the instructor if ED308 on audit)

CREDIT HOURS: 3

  MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

VISION STATEMENT Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A study of language and literacy development in young children.  Emphasis will be placed on the roles of teachers and families in facilitating reading, writing, speaking, and listening in young children, with an emphasis on the ages birth through age 5.  Students will observe and interact with children for a total of 15 hours in early childhood settings: Infant/Toddler, PreK, and Primary K-3.

 

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism. 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: Learners successfully completing ED 353 will be able to:

·         Apply current theory and research on language and literacy development to observations of children, families, and teachers (Relevant MoSTEP Standards 1.2.2 Relevant EC Competencies ECA3, ECB1 ECC5, ECC 13/Revised ECE Competencies 2.2).  (Classroom observations, Video analysis)

·         Describe the influence of families and communities on language and literacy development (Relevant MoSTEP Standards 1.2.3 Relevant EC Competencies ECB1, ECB2/Revised ECE Competencies 2.2, 5.1).  (Home observation)

·         Describe the interrelationship of reading, writing, speaking, and listening (Relevant MoSTEP Standard 1.2.7, Relevant EC Competencies ECC5, ECC6/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1 ).  (Video analysis)

·         Observe and analyze the role of concrete experiences and play to enhance and extend young children’s language development and emerging literacy (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.4, 1.2.5  Relevant EC Competencies ECC8/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2, 6.2, 6.3).  (Classroom observations)

·         Observe and evaluate learning environments, materials, and daily schedule to encourage language and literacy development (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.4  Relevant EC Competencies  ECC2, ECC5, ECC6/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2).  (Classroom observations)

·         Observe and analyze the role of adults in supporting children’s speaking, listening, reading and writing development (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.8   Relevant EC Competencies ECC4/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2). (Classroom observations, Video analysis)

·         Compare national, state, and district standards for children’s language and literacy development (Relevant MoSTEP Standard 1.2.4/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2).  (Standards analysis)

·         Explain a variety of authentic assessment strategies for language and literacy development including children from diverse cultural backgrounds and children with special needs (Relevant MoSTEP Standard 1.2.8 Relevant EC Competencies ECC4, ECC6/Revised ECE Competencies 4.1, 5.1, 5.2).  (Standards analysis)

·         Use observation and assessment to plan experiences designed to stimulate, support, and extend children’s language and literacy development (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.4 Relevant EC Competencies ECC2, ECC3, ECC4, ECC5, ECC6, ECC7, ECC8, ECC15/Revised ECE competencies 5.1, 5.2).  (Standards analysis)

·         Develop interactive techniques, including coaching, scaffolding, co-constructing, and questioning to support and extend children’s language and literacy development. (Relevant MoSTEP Standard 1.2.7, Relevant EC Competency ECC6/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2). (Weekly reflections PreK)

·         Develop teaching strategies to promote effective communication among children, teacher/s, and families (Relevant MOSTEP Standards. 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2.7  Relevant EC Competencies ECC5, ECE2/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2). (Classroom observations, Weekly reflections PreK

·         Describe and plan for the importance of teachers in creating secure and stimulating language communities that value the abilities of each child (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2.7 Relevant EC Competencies ECC3, ECC5, ECC6,  ECE2/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2).  (Classroom observations, Weekly reflections PreK, Video analysis)

·         Identify and value the multiple strategies children use to make meaning and participate in their language communities (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.2, 1.2.3 Relevant EC Competencies ECA3, ECB2/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1, 5.2). (Home and classroom observations, Video analysis)

·         Describe the diverse and significant contributions of families and community to the language and literacy development of children (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.2, 1.2. 3 Relevant EC Competencies ECA3, ECB2/Revised ECE Competencies 5.1) (Home observation, Video analysis)

·         Develop strategies to ensure that teachers will become life-long learners and reflective practitioners  (Relevant MOSTEP Standards 1.2.9 Relevant EC Competencies ECC9, ECC13/Revised ECE Competencies 7.6.) (Creating a Professional Community, Reflections on assignments)

 

Park University Literacies:

 

Analytical and Critical Thinking.  The student demonstrating analytical and critical thinking literacy will be able to gather, evaluate, and communicate information effectively; meet the basic computing demands of contemporary life; know standards of excellence; recognize varieties of problem-solving strategies; and be able to contribute to desirable changes or help preserve and transmit fundamental knowledge for the good of society. (Assignments: Creating a Professional Community, Reflections on assignments)

 

Ethics and Values.  The student demonstrating ethics and values literacy is sensitive to value questions, appreciatively and critically aware of differing value systems, in possession of tools for analyzing value questions, and engaged in the process of putting these things together into a constant set of personal values and testing them for life. (Assignments: Creating a Professional Community, Weekly reflections)

 

COURSE TEXTBOOKS:

Owocki, G.  (1999).  Literacy through play.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

 

Paley, V. (1998).  The girl with the brown crayon.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

Schickendanz, J.A., & Casgergque, R. M. (2004).  Writing in preschool.  International Reading Association.

 

Tabors, P. O. (1997).  One child, two languages: A guide for preschool educators of children learning English as a second language.  Baltimore, Brookes.

 

Vukelich, C., Christie, J., & Enz, B. (2002).  Helping young children learn language and literacy.  Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

Professional Journals (On reserve at the library):

 

Laster, B., & Conte, B. (1999).  Emerging literacy: Message boards in preschool.  Reading Teacher, 52, 417-419.

 

Labbo, L. D. (2005).  From morning message to digital morning message: Moving from the tried and true to the new.  Reading Teacher,58, 782-785.

 

Lefever-Davis, S., & Pearman, C. (2005).  Early readers and electronic texts: CD-ROM storybook features that influence reading behaviors.  Reading Teacher, 58, 446-454.

 

Meier, T. (2003). “Why can’t she remember that?” The importance of storybook reading in multilingual, multicultural classrooms.   Reading Teacher, 57, 242-252.

 

Moore, L. M. (1998).  Learning language and some initial literacy skills through social interactions.  Young Children, 53, 72-75

 

Morningstar, J. (1999).  Home response journals: Parents as informed contributors in the understanding of their child’s literacy development.  Reading Teacher, 52, 690-697.

 

Moustafa, M., &  Maldonado-Colon, E. (1999).  Whole-to-part phonics instruction: Building on what children know to help them know more.  Reading Teacher, 52, 448-458.

 

Moutry, C. (2003).  Three Teachers' Quest: Providing Daily Writing Activities for Kindergartners.  Young Children, 58, 24-28. 

 

Roskos, K.A., J.F. Christie, & D.J. Richgels. 2003. The essentials of early literacy instruction. Young Children 58, 52-60.

 

Wuori, D. 1999. Beyond letter of the week: Authentic literacy comes to kindergarten. Young Children 54, 24-25.

 

Xu, S. & Rutledge, A. (2003).  Chicken Starts with Ch! Kindergartners Learn through Environmental Print.  Young Children, 58, 44-51

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT:

 

Creating a Professional Community.  Each week you will be asked to identify two important ideas from the readings to share with a teaching partner or colleague.  Briefly explain the ideas and the major points you would make in your conversation with your colleague.  Then, consider the values underlying the ideas, for example, the importance of  honoring the child’s home language and culture.  Be sure to use the Park University Early Childhood Department goals for graduates as a resource in your thinking.  The purpose of this weekly assignment is to prepare you to be a teacher who reads and shares ideas with colleagues, and who considers the values underlying teaching decisions.  Your work must be completed on the first class meeting of each week  (10 pts. each for a total of 100 pts).  (Notice this assignment is not required each week.  Please read the syllabus carefully) (Park University Literacies: Analytical and Critical Thinking, Ethics and Values.) 

 

Application Assignments.  These assignments invite you to apply and extend your knowledge through a variety of questions.  Five of the application assignments require that you observe and interact with children for a minimum of 15 hours in early childhood settings.  Two of the assignments require you to analyze materials explored in the university classroom.  Each assignment has a rubric designed to reflect the content of the assignment. (425 pts. total.)  (Park University Literacies: Analytical and Critical Thinking, Ethics and Values.) 

 

GRADING PLAN:

Rating scales for each assignment are attached to the syllabus. Attendance and participation in daily activities is expected.  Absences will be considered in the final course evaluation.

A= 525-490 pts. Exceptional work that demonstrates strong understandings and critical thinking.

B= 489-440 pts.

C= 439-300 pts. 

 

Participation:  Dispositions for Becoming an Effective Teacher” will be used as the criteria for participation in class discussion and expectations for assignments.   To earn the grade of an “A” for the course your participation and coursework must clearly demonstrate each of the dispositions at the level of “3” or “4”.  This includes work being turned in on the date due and attendance.

 

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: All assignments must be turned in on time to receive full credit.  Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive but printers run out of ink and hard drive crash.  You are responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes. When turning in an assignment, be sure to provide the instructor with a paper copy rather than a disk or an e-mail attachment.

CLASS EXPECTATIONS:

·         Arrive promptly for class.

·         Turn off cell phone.

·         Actively participate in class learning experiences.

·         Attend all class meetings (excused absences for emergencies only).

 

     Each student will be an important part of the community of learners.  The learnings created through discussion and group work will be essential to developing understandings of the course content.  If you should have an emergency and are unable to attend, please be sure to call the instructor before the class meeting.  Attendance will be considered in determining the final course grade.   If you have more than five absences for the semester, your final evaluation will be lowered by one grade, for example, a “B” will become a “C.”  Three late arrivals or early departures = one missed class.

 

·         Complete all reading assignments before the class for which they are assigned.

·         Complete all assignments on the date indicated in the syllabus. 

 

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS

 

Week

Date

Topics and Assignments

1

August 22 and 26

Introduction

Reading:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz  Chapter

 

2

August 28 and September 2

The Child’s Spoken Language Development in the Context of Family and Community

Reading: Vukelich, Christie, & Enz Chapter 2

 

Assignments:

1.   Creating a Professional Community #1 (Due on Monday, August 28)

 

2.   Application Assignment.  Observe a child (birth – five years) and an adult in a home setting for a minimum of one hour. Take a rich collection of anecdotal and running records.

 

A. Based upon the strategies described in Vukelich, Christie, & Enz  (p. 42),

analyze the different opportunities and ways in which oral language (speaking and listening) is encouraged and extended in a home setting, including materials, experience, and interactions.  Be sure to include descriptive examples.

·    How is the child becoming a member of the language community?

·    How do the adults (or older children) seek to understand and extend the child’s ideas, thinking process, theories, feelings, and goals?

·    How is the child using language for different purposes?

·    How would each of the proposed theories of language acquisition explain your observation?

Be sure to use your readings to support and expand your thinking in your analysis

B. Reflect on your learnings from the assignment.  What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  What readings are helping you understand the issues?  Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?  How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?  (This is an important part of the assignment and should be at least 1-1-½ pages). 25 pts.  (Due Friday,  September 9)

 

3

September 9 (no class September 5)

Supporting and Extending the Child’s Spoken Language Development in Early Childhood Settings

Reading: Vukelich, Christie, & Enz  Chapter 3

 

Assignments:

 1.  Creating a Professional Community #2 (Due on Friday, September 5)

 

2.  Application Assignment:  Observe in a pre-k setting for a minimum of two hours. Take a rich collection of anecdotal and running records.  

A.  Based upon your observations explore the following concepts and questions, being sure to provide descriptive examples. 

·    How does teacher encourage, support, and extend language development?   How does the teacher seek to understand and extend the child/children’s ideas, thinking process, theories, feelings, and goals?

·    How do the teacher’s strategies differ in different contexts (e.g. arrival, play, large-group, small-group)?

·    How do the opportunities for language development differ from those observed in the home?

Be sure to draw upon readings to support and extend your thinking in your analysis

 

B. Reflect on your learnings from the assignment. What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  What readings are helping you understand the issues?  Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?  How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (This is an important part of the assignment and should be at least 1-1-½ pages).  50 pts.  Due September 16.

 

4

September 12-16

Children Learning English as a Second Language

 

Reading:

Tabors, P. O. (1997).  One child, two languages: A guide for preschool educators of children learning English as a second language.  Baltimore, Brookes.

 

NAEYC Position Statement. Many languages, many culture: Respecting and responding to diversity.  http://www.naeyc.org/about/positions/pdf/diversity.pdf

Assignments:

 

Assignments:

 

1.  Creating a Professional Community #3 (Due on Monday, September 12)

     

2. Application Assignment:  Arrange to visit a preschool or kindergarten classroom.  With the teacher’s assistance, identify a child whose primary home language is not English and observe the child for a minimum of  two hours. Take a rich collection of anecdotal and running records.

 

A.  Based upon your observations explore the following questions:

·         Does the child appear to comprehend some of the talk that is going on in the classroom.  How do you know?

·         How does the child communicate with other children? Provide descriptive examples.

·         How does the teacher support both the child’s languages?   Provide descriptive examples.

·         Are other children helping?  Provide descriptive examples.

·         Does the child have other opportunities to use his or her home language?  Provide descriptive examples.

Be sure to draw upon readings to support and extend your thinking in your analysis.

 

B.  Reflect on your learnings from the assignment.  What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  What readings are helping you understand the issues?  Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?  How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (This is an important part of the assignment and should be at least 1-1-½ pages).   50 pts.   Due September 23.

 

5

September 19and 23

Emerging Reading and Writing

 

Readings:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz  Chapters 4 & 6

 

Laster, B., & Conte, B. (1999).  Emerging literacy: Message boards in preschool.  Reading Teacher, 52, 417-419.

 

Moore, L. M. (1998).  Learning language and some initial literacy skills through social interactions.  Young Children, 53, 72-75.

 

Roskos, K.A., J.F. Christie, & D.J. Richgels. 2003. The essentials of early literacy instruction. Young Children 58, 52-60.

 

Assignments:

1.  Creating a Professional Community #4 (Due on Monday, September 19)

 

2. Application Assignment.  Arrange to work in a classroom at Northland Head Start for five one-hour visits over the next five weeks.  During that time you will be asked to interact with the children practicing different strategies for supporting their speaking, listening, reading, and writing, including fingerplays, songs, interactive readings (picture walks, dialogic reading, think-alouds), list-making, language experience approach, drawing to learn, etc.) Keep a weekly record of reflections about your time in the classroom describing the strategies you are practicing and the things you are learning. (Format for the journal to be distributed in class.) 25 pts. each/125 pts. total  Due October 21.  (Begin visits Week 4 to complete by Week 9)

6

September 26-30

Young Children as Readers: Sharing Good Books with Young Children

 

Reading:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz  Chapter 5

 

Assignment:

 

1.  Creating a Professional Community #5  (Due Monday, September 26)

 

7

October 3 and 7

Young Children as Writers

 

Reading:

Schickendanz, J.A., & Casgergque, R. M. (2004).  Writing in preschool.  International Reading Association.

 

Assignment:

 

  1. Creating a Professional Community #6  (Due Monday, October 3)

 

8

October 10 and 14

Literacy and Play

 

Reading:

Owocki, G.  (1999).  Literacy through play.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

 

1.  Creating a Professional Community #7  (Due Monday, October 10)

Fall Break

 

 

9

October 17 and 21

Ongoing Assessment and Adapting Instruction to Meet the Needs of Diverse Children

 

Reading: 

Vukelich, Christie, and Enz  Chapter 8

 

Assignment:

Application Assignment: Review the Head Start Child Outcomes, Missouri PreK Literacy Standards, and the Project Construct Standards.   Select one set of standards and describe how you might assess each of the language and literacy outcomes in your PreK classroom in an authentic manner that captures the child at her highest level of capability.  25 pts.  Due Friday, October 28.

 

10

October 24 and 28

Readers and Writers in Kindergarten Classrooms

 

Readings:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz Chapter 7

AND

Moustafa, M., &  Maldonado-Colon, E. (1999).  Whole-to-part phonics instruction: Building on what children know to help them know more.  Reading Teacher, 52, 448-458.

 

Moutry, C. (2003).  Three Teachers' Quest: Providing Daily Writing Activities for Kindergartners.  Young Children, 58, 24-28. 

 

Wuori, D. 1999. Beyond letter of the week: Authentic literacy comes to kindergarten. Young Children 54,  24-25.

 

Xu, S. & Rutledge, A. (2003).  Chicken Starts with Ch! Kindergartners Learn through Environmental Print.  Young Children, 58, 44-51

 

 

Assignments:

 

1.  Creating a Professional Community #8 (Due Monday, October 24)

 

2.  Application Assignment:  Observe for a minimum of five of hours (at least two different days) in a kindergarten classroom. Take a rich collection of anecdotal and running records. 

A.  Analyze the classroom and teaching strategies based upon the practices explored in the readings for the semester with specific focus placed on the ways the teacher 1) views children as capable and competent members of the literacy community, 2) provides explicit models of what good readers and writers do, 3) brings literature to life in the classroom, 4) connects literacy to children’s lives outside the classroom, and 5) integrates literacy across the curriculum.  Be sure to document with specific examples from your anecdotal records.

 

 B .Reflect on your learnings from the assignment.  What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  What readings are helping you understand the issues?  Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?  How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (This is an important part of the assignment and should be at least 1-1-½ pages).  125 pts.  Due Friday November 11.

 

OR

Arrange to work in a kindergarten classroom  for a minimum of five one-hour visits over the next five weeks.  During that time you will be asked to interact with the children practicing different strategies for supporting their speaking, listening, reading, and writing, including interactive readings (picture walks, dialogic reading, think-alouds), list-making, language experience approach, drawing to learn, etc.)

 

A.  Keep weekly reflections about your time in the classroom describing the strategies you are practicing and the things you are learning. (Format for the journal to be distributed in class.)

25 pts. each/125 total

Due November 21.  (Begin visits Week  9 to complete by Week 14)

 

 

11

October 31 and November 4

Readers and Writers in Kindergarten Classrooms: Multilingual and Multicultural Classrooms

 

Readings:

Meier, T. (2003). “Why can’t she remember that?” The importance of storybook reading in multilingual, multicultural classrooms.   Reading Teacher, 57, 242-252.

 

 

12

November 7 and 11

Readers and Writers in Kindergarten Classrooms: Using Technology

 

Readings:

Labbo, L. D. From morning message to digital morning message: Moving from the tried and true to the new.  Reading Teacher, 8, 782-785.

 

Lefever-Davis, S., & Pearman, C. (2005).  Early readers and electronic texts: CD-ROM storybook features that influence reading behaviors.  Reading Teacher, 58, 446-454.

 

 

13

November 14 and 18

Organizing the Curriculum and the Environment

 

Readings:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz Chapter 9

                                           

Assignment: 

 

Application Assignment.

 

1.After viewing the video “Classroom Researchers” write a descriptive analysis using the criteria in Vukelich (p. 217-218).  Be sure to take a rich collection of anecdotal and/or running records as you are viewing the video and use these records to 1) respond to the criteria discussed in Vukelich, 2) explain the interrelationship of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, and 3) analyze the teacher’s approach to working with families to support children’s literacy development. 

 

B.  Reflect on your learnings from the assignment.  What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  What readings are helping you understand the issues?  Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?  How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (This is an important part of the assignment and should be at least 1-1-½ pages).

25 pts.  Due  Monday, November 21.

 

14

November 21 (no class November 25)

Involving Families and the Community

Readings:

Vukelich, Christie, & Enz Chapter 10

 

Morningstar, J. (1999).  Home response journals: Parents as informed contributors in the understanding of their child’s literacy development.  Reading Teacher, 52, 690-697.

 

Assignment:

1.  Creating a Professional Community #9 (Due Monday, November 21)

15

November 28 and December 2

Creating Community through Literature

 

Readings:

 Paley  The girl with the brown crayon.

 

Assignment:

 

1.  Creating a Professional Community #10 (Due Monday, November 28)

16

December 5 and 9

Reflecting family life and values in the curriculum.

 

 

Finals Week

 

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community.  Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.” Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

 

PLAGIARISM: “Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another’s idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.”  Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY:  Attendance will be considered in determining the final course grade.   If you have more than five absences for the semester, your final evaluation will be lowered by one grade, for example, a “B” will become a “C.”  Three late arrivals or early departures = one missed class.

 

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

 

COPYRIGHT NOTIFICATION: This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.


EDC 353  Rubric for Observation #1  Child/Home Observation NAEYC Standards 1, 2, 5

Meets Expectations

25-20 pts.

Developing

19-10 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

9-0 pts.

Well-organized to examine the questions described in the syllabus.­­­

Provides descriptive accounts of the adult-child interactions.

Includes descriptive accounts of the child’s participation, responses, initiative, etc.

Applies relevant readings to the observation. Often more than one reading is used as a tool for analyzing the observation.

 

Concludes with a thoughtful, well-developed reflection on your learnings from the observation and implications for your teaching. 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?

 What readings are helping you understand the issues? 

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? 

How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Well-organized paragraphs.

 

 

 

 

 

Most questions examined and discussed.

 

Beginning effort to describe adult-child interactions..

 

Beginning efforts to describe child’s participation.

 

 

One text emphasized.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection demonstrates beginning attempt to think about the implications of observation.

 

 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?

 What readings are helping you understand the issues? 

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? 

How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Need to address more of the questions from syllabus.

Little or no evidence of interactions

Little or not evidence of the child’s responses.

 

Relies on personal opinion to evaluate observation.

 

 

Reflection is brief and/or superficial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________

 


EDC 353  Rubric for Observation #1  Child/Home Observation

Meets Expectations

25-20 pts.

Developing

19-10 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

9-0 pts.

Well-organized to examine the questions described in the syllabus.­­­

Provides descriptive accounts of the adult-child interactions.

Includes descriptive accounts of the child’s participation, responses, initiative, etc.

Applies relevant readings to the observation. Often more than one reading is used as a tool for analyzing the observation.

 

Concludes with a thoughtful, well-developed reflection on your learnings from the observation and implications for your teaching. 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?

 What readings are helping you understand the issues? 

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? 

How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Well-organized paragraphs.

 

 

 

 

 

Most questions examined and discussed.

 

Beginning effort to describe adult-child interactions..

 

Beginning efforts to describe child’s participation.

 

 

One text emphasized.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection demonstrates beginning attempt to think about the implications of observation.

 

 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?

 What readings are helping you understand the issues? 

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? 

How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Need to address more of the questions from syllabus.

Little or no evidence of interactions

Little or not evidence of the child’s responses.

 

Relies on personal opinion to evaluate observation.

 

 

Reflection is brief and/or superficial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________

 


EDC 353  Rubric for Observation #2  Preschool Observation  

Meets Expectations

50-45 pts.

Developing

44-25 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

24-0 pts.

Well-organized to examine the questions described in the syllabus.­­­

Provides descriptive accounts of the interactions, setting, teaching strategies, and learning experiences  observed.

Includes descriptive accounts of the children’s participation, responses, initiative, etc.

Applies relevant readings to the observation. Often more than one reading is used as a tool for analyzing the observation.

 

Concludes with a thoughtful, well-developed reflection on your learnings from the observation and implications for your teaching. 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be? 

What readings are helping you understand the issues?

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?

 How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Well-organized paragraphs.

 

 

 

 

 

Most questions examined and discussed.

 

Beginning effort to describe teaching strategies.

 

 

 

Beginning efforts to describe children’s participation.

 

 

 

One text emphasized.

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection demonstrates beginning attempt to think about the implications of observation.

 

 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be? 

What readings are helping you understand the issues?

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?

 How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Need to address more of the questions from syllabus.

Little or no evidence of the setting, interactions, or learning experiences.

 

Little or no evidence of children’s responses.

 

Relies on personal opinion to evaluate observation.

 

Reflection is brief and/or superficial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________


EDC 353  Rubric for Observation #3  English Language Learner Observation  

Meets Expectations

50-45 pts.

Developing

44-25 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

24-0 pts.

Well-organized to examine the questions described in the syllabus.­­­

Provides descriptive accounts of the interactions, setting, teaching strategies, and learning experiences  observed.

Includes descriptive accounts of the children’s participation, responses, initiative, etc.

Applies relevant readings to the observation. Often more than one reading is used as a tool for analyzing the observation.

 

Concludes with a thoughtful, well-developed reflection on your learnings from the observation and implications for your teaching. 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be? 

What readings are helping you understand the issues?

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?

 How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Well-organized paragraphs.

 

 

 

 

 

Most questions examined and discussed.

 

Beginning effort to describe teaching strategies.

 

 

 

Beginning efforts to describe children’s participation.

 

 

 

One text emphasized.

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection demonstrates beginning attempt to think about the implications of observation.

 

 

What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? 

How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be? 

What readings are helping you understand the issues?

Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? 

How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent?

 How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Need to address more of the questions from syllabus.

Little or no evidence of the setting, interactions, or learning experiences.

 

Little or no evidence of children’s responses.

 

Relies on personal opinion to evaluate observation.

 

Reflection is brief and/or superficial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________


EDC 353  Rubric for Journals  Preschool   

Meets Expectations

25-20 pts.

Developing

19-10 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

9-0 pts.

Weekly Reflection: Responses address all questions and reflect a strong understanding of course readings and discussion.

·    What new teaching strategies or materials did you implement or use?  Why? (NAEYC Standard 4.b, 4c)

·    Were the children meaningfully engaged in the learning experience?  How do you know?  Provide examples? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were there some children who were not able to become fully engaged in the learning experience?  What would you do next time to build on the strengths of these children? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a)

·    How might you share these experiences with families?  (NAEYC Standard 2c)

·    What readings are helping you understand the issues? (NAEYC Standard 4d)

·    How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

 

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Weekly Reflection: Responses address most questions and reflect a beginning understanding of course readings and class discussion.

·    What new teaching strategies or materials did you implement or use?  Why? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were the children meaningfully engaged in the learning experience?  How do you know?  Provide examples? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were there some children who were not able to become fully engaged in the learning experience?  What would you do next time to build on the strengths of these children? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a)

·    How might you share these experiences with families? (NAEYC Standard 2c)

·    What readings are helping you understand the issues?  (NAEYC Standard 4d)

·    How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Weekly Reflection: Responses fail to address many questions and fail to provide evidence of understanding course readings or class discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________


EDC 353  Rubric for Journals  Kindergarten   

Meets Expectations

25-20 pts.

Developing

19-10 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

9-0 pts.

Weekly Reflection: Responses address all questions and reflect a strong understanding of course readings and discussion.

·    What new teaching strategies or materials did you implement or use?  Why? (NAEYC Standard 4.b, 4c)

·    Were the children meaningfully engaged in the learning experience?  How do you know?  Provide examples? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were there some children who were not able to become fully engaged in the learning experience?  What would you do next time to build on the strengths of these children? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    What readings are helping you understand the issues? (NAEYC Standard 4d)

·    How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a)

·    How might you share these experiences with families?  (NAEYC Standard 2c)

·    How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

 

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

 

 

 

Weekly Reflection: Responses address most questions and reflect a beginning understanding of course readings and class discussion.

·    What new teaching strategies or materials did you implement or use?  Why? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were the children meaningfully engaged in the learning experience?  How do you know?  Provide examples? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    Were there some children who were not able to become fully engaged in the learning experience?  What would you do next time to build on the strengths of these children? (NAEYC Standard 4b, 4c)

·    What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

·    What readings are helping you understand the issues?  (NAEYC Standard 4d)

·    How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a)

·    How might you share these experiences with families? (NAEYC Standard 2c)

·    How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d)

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Weekly Reflection: Responses fail to address many questions and fail to provide evidence of understanding course readings or class discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________


EDC Rubric for Kindergarten Observation

Meets Expectations

125-115 pts.

Developing

114-80 pts.

Does Not Meet Expectations

79-0 pts.

Well-organized to examine the questions described in the syllabus.

Provides descriptive accounts of the setting, teaching strategies, and learning experiences  observed.

 

Includes descriptive accounts of the children’s participation, responses, initiative, etc.

Applies relevant readings to the observation. Often more than one reading is used as a tool for analyzing the observation.

 

Concludes with a thoughtful, well-developed reflection on your learnings from the observation and implications for your teaching. 

Careful attention to spelling and grammar.

 

Well-organized paragraphs.

 

 

 

 

 

Most questions examined and discussed.

 

Beginning effort to describe teaching strategies.

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning efforts to describe children’s participation.

 

 

 

One text emphasized.

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection demonstrates beginning attempt to think about the implications of observation.

 

 

 

Some errors in grammar and spelling.

 

 

 

Needs to address more of the questions from syllabus.

 

More description necessary for reader to visualize setting, interactions, or learning experiences.

 

Needs more attention to children’s responses.

Needs to include readings in discussion.  Relies on personal opinion to evaluate observation.

 

 

Reflection is brief and/or superficial.

 

Substantial errors in grammar and spelling.

 

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.

 

 

 

 

Name________________________________________  Date_____________________

Points earned__________________________