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EDE 380 Literacy for Early Childhood and Elementary Teachers
Lofflin, Kathy Ehrig


COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: EDE380

COURSE TITLE: Literacy for Elementary and Early Childhood Teachers

COURSE DESCRIPTOR:

TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT:  Fall, 2005

NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Dr. Kathy Lofflin

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Associate Professor of Education

FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION: Watson Literacy Center, MA 330A

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-8:30; 11:30-12:00; 3:00-5:00; Wednesdays by appointment

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: (816) 584-6419

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: klofflin@mail.park.edu

OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS:

FACULTY WEB PAGE ADDRESS:

DATES OF THE TERM:  August 22-December 16

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Tuesday-Thursday

CLASS SESSION TIME: 8:45-11:25

PREREQUISITE(S): Admission to Teacher Education, and must either have successfully completed or be currently enrolled in EDE 325, Grammar for Teachers.

CREDIT HOURS: 6.0

 

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Teaching literacy as a lifelong endeavor including reading research, emergent literacy/reading readiness, primary and intermediate reading, writing, listening, and speaking in order to prepare students to become competent communicators.  Emphasis on the development and organization of an authentic language arts program including the principles and practices which will lead to literacy.  Classroom observations enable the student to learn about the delivery of literacy instruction in a sequential program within an elementary school setting. 

 

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: The instructor’s philosophy and approach to teaching any professional education course may be summed up in one word:  engagement.

            Engagement means full involvement by both instructor and students.  When someone is engaged, he/she places her/his full attention on the learning task at hand, and is fully “into” the learning activities of the moment rather than thinking about or attending to anything else.  She/he consistently pays attention, watches/listens carefully, and works to make the most of every learning opportunity.  Neither interruptions nor distractions, nor “just getting by”, is permitted.  Learning time is sacred, and important.  The instructor is committed to being fully engaged when she is teaching or working with students and their work, and she expects the same engagement level of  students when they are in class or working on assignments.  Indeed, when students later work in the classroom as teachers, the children they will work with deserve nothing less than full engagement.

            The instructor will endeavor to set up the classroom environment to maximize engagement. Some strategies for this will include hands-on activities, cooperative and collaborative learning, a stress on higher level learning outcomes  (application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation),  providing “scaffolding” to help students succeed at their highest ability levels,  stressing real-life and cross-disciplinary connections, requiring individual accountability for learning, and facilitating response opportunities for all students.   But engagement is not the instructor’s task alone.  Taking responsibility for making the most of the learning opportunities of the course will also be expected of each student.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

“COURSE OBJECTIVES”:

 

            Literacy instruction has long been a controversial subject, and it continues to be today.   Because literacy is the tool by which humans think, learn and communicate, every teacher must be a literacy educator.  Every literacy educator has the task of building a unique theoretical orientation toward literacy, an orientation that is grounded in both the experiences of others and in personal experience, that is reflectively built over the course of a lifetime, and that is flexible enough to be modified in the face of new learning and new experiences.    Learners are at the center of every good literacy educator’s theoretical orientation--the idea that literacy is all about constructing meaning, all about helping every single child become a literate, empowered citizen within a democratic society.   Although each literacy educator must take her or his own path toward  a theoretical orientation, keeping learners and meaning at the heart of it all will keep the focus where it belongs.

            In this course, preservice teachers will begin the journey toward building a theoretical orientation to literacy that can guide and serve them as they work to help the learners they will be entrusted with to grow as literate citizens.  It is a lifelong journey, and will not be completed in a single semester.  But if a “spark” and passion for literacy can start here, the course will have been a success.

 

 

“LEARNING OBJECTIVES”

 

Upon successful completion of this course:

1.  Students will describe current theoretical models of literacy learning, discuss the implications of those models for literacy instruction, and begin to develop their own grounded theoretical stances on literacy and literacy instruction.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  1.2, 3.1

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 2,3,4, Skills 8, 17, Dispositions 5, 9, 10, 16

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.1, 1.2, 5.1

Assessment artifacts:  Literacy Autobiography*, Theoretical Orientation to Reading Profile—pre and post assessment with reflective pieces**, homework assignments from Vacca text*

 

2.  Students will build a working knowledge of the language and vocabulary used by literacy educators, and will use that knowledge to inform their instructional practice.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standard:  1.2.1

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  1.3

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 4, 7, Skills 9, 15, Dispositions 5, 16

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.1, 1.4

Assessment artifacts:  Homework assignments from Vacca, Wilde, and Ray texts*, completion of the Fox/Hull workbook*

 

3.  Students will competently present literacy lessons using a variety of frameworks.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.1, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2.7

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  1.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8

School of Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 6, Skills 4, 5, 6, 10, 12,13, 19, Dispositions 2, 3, 10, 18, 23, 24, 25

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 5.3

Assessment artifacts:  Literacy Instructional Modules*

 

4.  Students will critically observe literacy instruction in school settings across a range of age levels and will reflect on the implications of what they observed for their own future practice.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.2, 1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  2.1, 2.2, 2.3

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 2, 8, Skills 8, 17, Dispositions 7, 9, 15

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.1, 1.3

Assessment artifact:  School observation writeups*

 

5.  Students will describe how children acquire literacy and how children's literacy develops as they mature, keeping the emergent nature of literacy in mind as they develop literacy instruction. 

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standard:  1.2.2

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 1, 2, 9, Skills 1, Dispositions 1, 8

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.1, 1.3, 3.2

Assessment artifacts:  Homework assignments from Vacca text and for supplementary articles*, school observation writeups*, literacy development artifact activity**, Literacy Instructional Modules*

 

6.  Students will describe and practice using some basic tools used in literacy assessment, including both formal and informal/authentic approaches.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standard:  1.2.8

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  2.4, 3.2

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 12, Skills 1, 2, 8, 9, 14, Dispositions 1, 8; IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  3.1, 3.2

Assessment artifacts:  Homework assignments from Vacca and Wilde texts*, miscue analysis project*, homework assignments from Wilde text*; informal reading inventory evaluation activity**

 

7.  Students will describe the theory behind miscue analysis, discuss its strengths and weaknesses as a diagnostic tool, and begin to develop competency in miscue analysis procedures and interpretation.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.8, 1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 2.5, 3.2

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 12, Skills 1, 2, 3, 14, 15, Dispositions 1, 8, 14

Assessment artifacts:  Miscue analysis project*, homework assignments from Wilde text*

 

8.  Students will discuss how the various literacy modalities—written literacy (reading, writing), oral literacy (speaking, listening), and visual literacy (viewing, visually representing)--are linked, and will design instruction that integrates all of these components.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.1, 1.2.3, 1.2.5

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  1.2, 2.1, 2.5, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  2.2, 2.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 6, Skills 5, 6, 11, 12, Dispositions 3

Assessment artifacts: Literacy Instructional Modules*

 

9.  Students will design instructional plans that address children’s literacy needs within contexts that are authentic and meaningful for early childhood and elementary school students.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.5

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.2, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 1,6, 7, 8, 10,  Skills 1, 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 19, Dispositions 3, 4, 10

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4

Assessment artifacts: Literacy Instructional Modules*

 

10.  Students will reflect upon how they can address the literacy needs of children in authentic contexts while at the same time managing the demands of dealing with mandated literacy programs, state and national standards, and standardized testing.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standards:  1.2.4, 1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  This outcome not addressed in these state competencies.

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 5, 10, 11, 12, Skills 2, 7, 15, Dispositions 7, 8, 12, 13, 14

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  2.3, 4.1, 4.2, 5.1, 5.2

Assessment artifacts:  Literacy Instructional Modules*,  basal analysis activity**; No Child Left Behind/Reading First critical analysis**

 

11.  Students will reflect upon how their own literacy experiences throughout life may shape them as literacy educators. 

 

Relevant MoStep Standard:  1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  2.3

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 3, Skills 8, Dispositions 1, 7, 8

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  5.1, 5.2

Assessment artifacts:  Literacy Autobiography*, Theoretical Orientation to Reading Profile—pre and post assessment with reflective pieces**

 

12.  Students will discover opportunities for ongoing professional development in the field of literacy education, and will begin planning to take advantage of some of those opportunities.

 

Relevant MOSTEP Standard:  1.2.9

Missouri Elementary Education English/Language Arts Competencies:  This outcome not addressed in these state competencies.

School of Education Conceptual Framework:  Knowledge 7, 9, Skills 7, 16, 17, 18, Dispositions 4, 5, 9, 10, 16, 17, 18, 25

IRA Standards for Reading Professionals:  5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4

Assessment artifact:  Professional organization exploration activity**, as opportunities arise, participation in professional groups**)

 

 

*Graded assignments

**Ungraded activities

Note:  Both of these will produce artifacts suitable for use in students' departmental portfolios.

 

COURSE TEXTBOOK(S):

All of the following are required and are necessary to do well in this course.

 

Bell, Donna, & Jarvis, Donna.  (2002).  Letting go of "letter of the week."  Primary Voices, K-6, 11(2),

10-24.

 

Fox, Barbara J., & Hull, Marion A.  (1998).  Phonics for the teacher of reading (8th ed.).

             Upper Saddle River, NJ:  Merrill.  ISBN 0-13-026538-1

 

Ray, Katie Wood.  (1999).  Wondrous words:  Writers and writing in the elementary

            classroom.  Urbana IL:  National Council of Teachers of English.  ISBN 0-8141-5816-1

 

Vacca, Jo Anne L., Vacca, Richard T., Gove, Mary K., Burkey, Linda, Lenhart, Lisa A., & McKeon,

 Christine  (2003).   Reading and learning to read (5th ed.).  Boston:              Allyn & Bacon. 

ISBN 0-205-36111-0

 

Wilde, Sandra.  (2000).  Miscue analysis made easy:  Building on student strengths. 

            Portsmouth NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-325-00239-8

 

Yopp, Hallie K., & Yopp, Ruth Helen.  (2000).  Supporting phonemic awareness development in the

            classroom.  The Reading Teacher, 54(2), 130-143.

 

NOTE:  The Fox, Ray, Vacca, and Wilde texts are professional books you should purchase (they have been ordered by the bookstore).  The Bell and Yopp texts are journal articles available in the library on reserve or electronically on the Internet.  If you have difficulty obtaining these two articles, see your instructor.  You will use all of these texts as professional resources for years to come.  You need them on your professional bookshelf.  They were selected carefully with that in mind.

 

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments.  Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

 

PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance.  Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences.  The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment.  Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.  In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: No weekly homework will be accepted more than one week (two class periods) late; one point will be deducted for homework that one class meeting late, and two points will be deducted for homework that is two class meetings late. For the Fox/Hull text, the grade will be reduced by 10% for each class meeting that it is late.   For the remaining course requirements, late work will be accepted at any time until the final, but the grade will be reduced one time by 10% (one grade level). Absolutely no late work of any kind will be accepted after the time of the scheduled final.

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT: Assessment artifacts are linked to their related objectives in the Course Objectives section above.  Assessment artifacts that will be graded are marked with one asterisk and also are listed in the last section of this document, Grading Plan.  Full details, and criteria for each graded artifact, will be provided in class.  Assessment artifacts which will be completed in class but will not be graded are marked with two asterisks.  Though not graded, these artifacts will still serve as indicators of mastery of course outcomes.

 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT: Students are expected to act professionally in the classroom.  That means not monopolizing discussions, and showing courtesy, politeness, and kindness to everyone in the room (including both students and the instructor).  No swearing, coarse language, threatening behavior, shouting, or putdowns of any person or group of persons will be permitted.  The instructor will make one verbal correction, but if the behavior continues, administrators will be consulted as to appropriate consequences.

 

Please turn off all cell phones and pagers before entering the classroom.  No calls are to be taken during class time.

 

No food or drink is permitted in the classroom, office, or resource areas of the Watson Literacy Center, except for plain water in a container with a tight-fitting lid.  Drinks and food should be consumed during the class break outside the Center.

 

Please do not bring children under age 5 into the classroom for any reason.  We love the little ones, but small children are almost always a distraction.  Children age 5 and over may visit in extreme emergencies, but only with advance clearance, and with the understanding that if the child becomes tired or distracts the class in any way, the adult responsible will immediately take the child out of the classroom.  And please, do not bring a child of any age into the classroom if she or he has a potentially communicable illness.

 

Please help us keep the classroom clean.  "Police" your area before you leave and throw away any trash.  Do not "stuff" trash containers if they are already full.  Please find another container or take the trash with you.

 

Please regularly check your Pirate mail.  If this is inconvenient, please transfer your Park e-mail to the e-mail address you use daily.  The instructor may try to communicate with students via Pirate mail, and in fact it is much easier to do that than to make a list each semester with each student's personal e-mail.  Not only does this mean more timely information, but it also it is more economical (the University spends thousands of dollars a year on copying each year that could be used for better things) and better for the environment.  Sometimes you may want to print things out, but other times a document is just as useful (or more so) as an electronic file.

 

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability

 

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS:

Week

Date

Topics/Assignments

1

August 23-25

 

Tuesday Topics: 

  • Course introduction/orientation
  • Theoretical orientations to literacy
  • New views of literacy
  • Your Literacy Autobiography

Thursday Workshop model:  Directed Reading/Thinking Activity (DRTA)

Reading:  Read syllabus carefully on your own.

Assignment:  Start on Fox/Hull text immediately.  Make a plan for timely completion.

2

August 30-Sept. 1

 

 

Tuesday Topics: 

  • Literacy instructional modules and literacy instruction
  • Resources for instructional ideas
  • State standards and grade-level expectations for Communication Arts

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 1 and 2 (one set of questions for both chapters—combine them)   Reminder:  Readings will always be due on Tuesdays, starting this week.

Thursday Workshop model:  KWL

Assignment:  Work on Fox/Hull text on a daily basis.

 

 

3

Sept. 6-8

 

           

 

 

Tuesday Topic:

 Literacy Development

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 3

Thursday Workshop model:  Language Experience Approach (LEA)

Assignment:  Literacy Autobiography, due Sept. 8.  Continue working intensively on Fox/Hull text (should be about half done).          

 

4

Sept. 13-15

 

 

Tuesday Topic: 

  • Literacy Development
  • Analysis of literacy artifacts activity (in class)   

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 4

Thursday Workshop model:  Shared reading

Assignment:  Should be coming to the end of the Fox/Hull text.

 

5

Sept. 20-22

 

 

 

Tuesday Topics: 

  • Literacy assessment
  • Assessing text difficulty
  • Readability
  • Cloze procedure

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 5

Thursday topics:

  •  Assessing the reader
  • Quick assessments
  • Running records
  • Informal reading inventories
  • IRI analysis activity

 

6

Sept. 27-29

 

 

Tuesday Topic: 

Working with words

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 6

Thursday Workshop models:  Word wall lessons, cloze lessons

Assignment:  Fox/Hull book completed, turned in no later than Sept. 29.

 

7

Oct. 4-6

 

 

Tuesday Topics:

  • Phonics
  • Phonemic awareness

Thursday workshop model:  Yopp & Yopp’s phonemic awareness activities      

Reading:  Two journal articles, one by Yopp & Yopp and one by Bell & Jarvis (full bibliography given earlier in this syllabus).  This time, complete two sets of questions, one for each article.  Complete questions for the Yopp article by Oct. 4 and for the Bell article by Oct. 6.

 

8

Oct. 11-13

 

(Oct. 17-21 is Fall Recess; classes will not meet that week.)

 

Tuesday Topic: Reading Comprehension

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 8 (Note:  We are skipping Chapter 7).

Thursday workshop models:   Semantic mapping, story mapping, Venn diagrams

Assignment:  Literacy Instructional Module #1 due no later than Oct. 13.

 

9

Oct. 25-27

 

 

Tuesday Topic: Reading Comprehension           

Reading:  Ray, Ch. 1& 2; skim Ch. 3, 4 & 5 (only one set of questions for Ch. 1 and 2 combined)

Thursday workshop model:  Figurative language lesson (teaching inference-making)

Assignment:  Observation writeups due no later than Oct. 27.

 

10

Nov. 1-3

 

 

Tuesday Topic: 

Writing

Reading:  Ray, Ch. 6 & 11; skim the intervening chapters (only one set of questions for the combination of Ch. 6 and 11)

Thursday workshop model:  Writer’s workshop

 

11

          Nov. 8-10

 

 

Tuesday Topic:  Writing                  

Reading:  Ray, Ch 13 &14; skim Ch. 15 (only one set of questions for Ch. 13 and 14 combined)

Thursday workshop model:  Literature circles/Reading workshop

Assignment:  Literacy Instructional Module #2 is due no later than Nov. 10.

 

12

Nov. 15-17

 

 

Topic (Tuesday and Thursday): Miscue analysis

Reading:  Wilde, Ch. 1-4 (only one set of questions for this entire set of chapters)

 

13

Nov. 22-24

 

 

 

(The class will not meet on Nov. 24, which is Thanksgiving Day.)

 

Tuesday Topic:  Miscue analysis

Reading:  Wilde, Ch. 5-7 (only one set of questions for this entire set of chapters)

Thursday:  Thanksgiving holiday, no class

 

14

          Nov. 29-Dec. 1

 

 

Topic (Tuesday and Thursday):  Miscue analysis

Reading:  Wilde, Ch. 8-11

Assignment:  Literacy Instructional Module #3 is due no later than Dec. 1.

 

15

Dec. 6-8

 

 

Tuesday Topics:  

  • Working with mandated programs
  • “Balanced” literacy programs
  • Basal analysis activity

Reading:  Vacca, Ch. 12

Thursday Topics: 

  • No Child Left Behind/Reading First—critical analysis
  • Professional organizations—group research activity in class.

 

16

         Finals Week:

Scheduled Final is Thursday, Dec. 15, 8:00-10:00.

 

 

 

Topics: 

  • Revisiting theoretical orientations to reading, reflective writing in class
  • ED 381 and your portfolio
  • Course conclusion

Assignment:  Miscue analysis project due no later than Dec. 15.

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING PLAN: Each of the five requirements below will result in a percentage grade.  The five percentages will be weighted as indicated below to determine the final course grade.

 

            1.  Homework assignments  (10%)

            2.  Classroom Observation Writeups  (10%)

            3.  Fox/Hull text completion (10%)

            4.  Three Literacy Instructional Modules documenting actual literacy teaching with children  (60%)

            5.  Miscue Analysis Project (10%)

 

Further details about these projects will be provided in class.