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TH 302 Creative Drama
Bush, Gail L.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseTH 302 Creative Drama
SemesterF2J2004
FacultyBush, Gail L.
TitleInstructor/Adjunct Faculty
Degrees/CertificatesBA History
Elem. Ed. Cert. 1-6
Office Hoursarranged by appointment
Daytime Phone(816) 229-7851
E-Mailgail.bush@park.edu
Web Pagehttp://captain.park.edu/gbush/
Semester DatesOct. 25- Dec. 13, 2004
Class Days-M-----
Class Time5:30 - 9:50 PM
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Heinig, Ruth Beall.  Creative Drama for the Classroom Teacher, 4th ed.
ISBN 0-13-189663-6

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Course Description:
Theory and practice of the use of creative drama as an alternative teaching/learning tool and as a support technique in working with diverse-needs populations and age groups-such as drama in education for curricular and language skill enhancement; drama as self-esteem, social interaction, and coordination building tools; and drama in therapy.  Includes off-campus workshop opportunities in area schools.  Especially recommended for Education, Communications, Psychology, and Social Work majors and recreation leaders.  1:2:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor of this course bases her philosophy of teaching on contemporary research regarding effective teaching and learning, which indicates that students internalize and retain significantly more from doing than from simply listening.  The primary goal of this course is to introduce college students to creative drama and its teaching possibilities, and to train them in leading creative drama activities in a variety of learning situations.  To that end the instructor will ask students to engage in leadership roles in the creative drama process, so that they will experience the benefits of hands-on learning for themselves and will pass this on to their future students.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the student should have acquired the following:
A.A basic understanding of some of the background and theories of creative drama as a learning tool in education, therapy, and actor training.
B.A basic understanding of the resources available for use in creative drama.
C.Basic skills in writing creative drama lesson plans designed to meet the needs of diverse student populations.
D.Basic understanding of the observation and evaluation of children's drama skills for subsequent assessment.
E.Increased skills in the informal written and verbal communication of ideas.
F.Increased skills in lesson planning and backup (crisis management) planning.
G.Increased skills in group leadership and effective oral presentation.
H.Increased skills in the research, organization, documentation and writing of a formal research project.

Course Assessment:
The content of this course will be conducted through reading, informal written work, formal written research (paper), activity file-building, informal presentations, discussion, in-class practice-leading of exercises, and direct child contact.

Grading:
25% Weekly attendance/Discussion/Participation/Cooperation
25% Presentations/lesson plans/in-class leadership
20% Research activity design project and leadership of children
20% Activity Card File
5% Self-Evaluation
5% Quiz

90-100% A
80-89% B
70-79% C
60-69% D
59% and below F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Presentations, activity cards, chapter readings, and written work are due on dates assigned.  Papers received after the assigned due date will be marked down one grade for each subsequent meeting day of the class.  Specific grading criteria will be stipulated on the guide sheets for each assignment.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Cooperative Participation/Positive Attitude and Behavior:
1. Cooperative Participation:  All students will participate as fully as physically possible in all in-class activities, discussions, etc.
2. Positive (Respectful) Attitude/Behavior:  All students are expected to exhibit a mature and supportive attitude at all times during class.

Examples of inappropriate attitude or behavior:
a. derogatory comments/eye-rolling/snickering during individual performances or discussions.
b. whispered conversations during individual performances or discussions.
c. excessive rattling of papers and materials during individual performances or discussions.
d. entering or exiting the classroom during individual performances.
e. excessive off-topic verbal interruptions or discussion domination.

Dress Code:
1.You are going to move around quite a bit, so dress comfortably (soft-soled shoes and clothing in which you can move freely).
Acceptable:  sweats, loose jeans, leotards/tights, tennis/athletic shoes
Absolutely no chewing gum, caps, hats, excessive jewelry, hard-soled shoes or heels,
dresses, skirts, tight-fitting clothes
2. Presentation days:  Dress for success.

Out-of-class Attendance:  The intent of this class is that it should culminate in actual work sessions
with children.  Due to the size of the class, this may involve the scheduling of some out of class
workshop sessions.  Advance notice will be given.  

Student-to-Instructor Communication:  If you have any questions regarding an assignment, or if you have a conflict that seriously interferes with your ability to complete any aspect of this course by the date due, notify me immediately--PLEASE do not wait until the last week of class.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
The following dates given for text work/performance sessions are intended as a guideline and may require modification based on numbers and needs of students enrolled.  Dates and assignments are therefore subject to change.

Meeting DatesClass ActivitiesAssignmentsTests
Oct. 25Introduction to Course and Text

Summary of Chapters 1-3 & 12 Creative Drama Basics, Lesson Plan Writing

What is Creative Drama?

Writing lesson objectives; goals vs. objectives

Instructor-led sample activities & activity cards

Workshop group formation
Read Chapters 1-3 of text before coming to class 
Nov. 1Chapter 4, 7  Drama and Pantomime Games

Instructor-led sample activities

What makes a game a “Creative Drama” game?

Activity card group workshop #1 (Drama Games)

Introduction to research project
Read Chapters 4 & 7 of text before coming to class

DUE: Drama game resource
 
Nov. 8   Chapters 5-6, 10 Narrative Pantomime, Story Dramatization

Group-led demo exercises & discussion (Drama Games)

Identifying literature suitable for narrative pantomime

Instructor-led sample activity

Activity Card Group Workshop #2  (Narrative Pantomime)
Read Chapters 5, 6 & 10 of text before coming to class

DUE: 5 activity cards

BRING: Story or picture book
 
Nov. 15 Chapters 8-9, 11 Improvisation, Role Drama

Group-led demo exercises & discussion (Narrative Pantomime)

How can the leader prepare participants for improvisation?

Instructor-led sample activity

Activity Card Group Workshop #3 (Improvisation)
Read Chapters 8, 9 & 11 of text before coming to class

DUE: 5 activity cards

BRING: Unusual or ambiguous object
 
Nov. 22 Group-led demo exercises & discussion (improvisation)

Outlining the key components of the research paper

Computer Lab Activity Card Group Workshop #4 (Free Choice)
DUE: 5 activity cards 
Nov. 29 Research Project--Peer Review, Revise and EditDUE: 5 Activity Cards

DUE: Research Paper Rough Draft
Quiz—Types of Creative Drama
Dec.  6  In-Class Project Presentations [with children] DUE: Typed research project 
Dec. 13    In-Class Project Presentations [with children]

Makeup Presentations (if any)
DUE: Self-Evaluation 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100


PLEASE NOTE: This is a participation class and therefore requires your attendance and involvement. ONLY ONE ABSENCE WILL BE ALLOWED before the attendance portion of the semester grade begins to drop one letter grade per day missed.  

Unexcused Absences:  An absence is only excused if the instructor receives a phone message prior to the
start of class and the absence falls under the guidelines listed below.  
Note #1:  From “Notification of Illness” in the Park College Student Calendar/Handbook for 1998-99,
p. 19:  “It is the responsibility of the student to notify instructors of absences related to illness.  
Illness is not an excuse for missing class, and the determination as to whether or not missed
work can be made up is at the discretion of the individual faculty members.”
Note #2:  Sports Event Course Conflicts:  Each student athlete is responsible for providing a schedule
of games by the end of the first week of class.  In addition, each student athlete must provide
written notification must be co-signed by the supervising coach for what sport and delivered to
me no later than the week before the class will be missed.  Any written work due on the day you will miss must be submitted with your written advanced notification.  (Suggestion:  If you are going to miss more than 1 class due to sport event participation, consider taking another class.)
Note #3:  Papers, presentations, etc., are due on dates as assigned.  Papers/presentations/etc. received after the designated class session will be marked down one grade lower for each meeting day of the class.
Note #4:  The student will be responsible for anything missed on the day s/he was absent. (Making up work, getting assignments for the upcoming class, etc.)

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.