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EN 355 American Ethnic Literature
Chadwell, Sharon D.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EN 355 American Ethnic Literature LC

Semester

S1AA2006

Faculty

Chadwell, Sharon D.

Title

Senior Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

M. B. A. - Webster University
M. A. (Human Resources Development) - Webster University
Principal Certification State of Texas - Our Lady of the Lake University

Office Location

by appointment

Office Hours

by appointment

E-Mail

sharon.chadwell@park.edu

schadwell@satx.rr.com

msschadwell@yahoo.com

Semester Dates

January 9 - March 6, 2006

Class Days

------S

Class Time

7:45 - 1:10 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Gates, Henry Louis & McKay, Nellie. (1997). The Norton Anthology: African-American Literature. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Handouts of Other Multicultural writers to include: Joy Harjo, Cesar Chavez, Juan Flores, Meena Alexander, Amy Tan, Laura Esquivel, Chief Dan George Salish, Longtail, and others

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
Additional resources will be linked in classroom's eCompanion via parkonline.org

http://parkonline.org

Course Description:
The course presents American ethnic literary expressions including selected short stories, poems, personal narratives, essays, and plays from the earliest examples to the present.  The heaviest concentration of works is from the 20th Century.  Examination of the cultures from which the literature emerges and of literary styles and structures is a regular feature of the course.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Race is a very difficult subject to discuss because it brings up images of being guilty, hostile, patronizing, or sometimes resentful. The purpose behind literature, in particularly any ethnic literature course, is to help the student confront and think about those images. As an instructor, my intent is twofold: (1) to help students develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills to help explore the relationship among multicultural literature and its mark on American culture and its historical context; (2) to encourage students to engage in lively discussions examining premises and contradictions.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Discuss and analyze a variety of American ethnic texts in the context of various ethnic literary traditions and criticism.
  2. Formulate an appreciation for the diversity of American cultures and for the artistic artifacts of those cultures.
  3. Demonstrate the acquisition of language appropriate to the field of literature.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain and integrate the various literary periods surrounding ethnic literature
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of how American ethnic writers addressed issues of race, gender, women
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how American ethnic literature contributes to the overall oral and written history of American society.
  4. Collaborate with team members in preparing presentations
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in academic writing
Class Assessment:
Examinations, presentations, papers, journals, team project

Grading:
Total possible points: 220 points
Based on 92%, 82%, 72%, 62%

A 202-220 points
B 180-201 points
C 158-179 points
D 136-157 points
F below 136 points
Assessments:
1. Individual Assessment (30 points):
a. Submit 6 journal entries via parkonline.org approximately 200 words regarding readings, information gained from lectures, audio and visual presentations, or in-class discussions. Title entries according to class date.
The journal assignment is designed to let me know that you are keeping up with the readings and to allow "one-to-one" communication between us.  I will occasionally pose specific questions for students to address in their journals and I will sometimes prepare handouts from these weekly writings, so be sure to indicate to me in case you want your work to be used anonymously or not used at all in this way.  

2. Team Assessment  (60 points):
       Select characteristics and prepare a matrix
       comparing and contrasting 3 eras reflecting
       diversity in literature. Periods defined in the
       context of the African-American literary period
       could be used as a foundation for comparative
       purposes. Characteristics for possible
       consideration are major historical events during
       period; literary theme of the era; or how writers
       addressed issues of race, gender, women's rights,
       nation, slavery, and citizenship; etc. Aside from
       your textbook, use 3 other sources to derive
       information per era. Be thorough in your
       presentation (Due February 21).  This will be the
       basis for your week 8 team presentation. This
       section is worth 40 points)

b. Team will present a PowerPoint presentation
       discussing the 3 eras. Be creative in your
       presentations: i.e. include videos, music, or art.
       Time limit:  no more than 30 minutes. This section
       is worth 20 points.
(Due Week 8)      

3.      Individual Assessment (50 points):
       Using 6 literary elements, interpret, compare, and contrast 2 pieces of literature from the anthology. (Due week 7). Paper should be between 1200 – 1500 words. See rubric for additional information. Your paper should address these two questions: How do these pieces of literature contribute to the oral/written history of American society? Why? Must have at least 3 references(Due week 7)

4. Team participation points (10 points)

5. Plagiarism prevention quiz (10 points) (Due week 2)

6. Midterm exam (30 points)

7. Final exam            (30 points)

8. Self-Directed Extra Credit (up to 5 points)
Explore a website devoted to any ethnic-American author we're reading or of your choice, and writing a 2-page. paper summarizing, analyzing, and critiquing its value. If you are interested in completing one of these tasks for extra credit, you must e-mail or meet with me first to discuss your plan. (Due week 7)

Late Submission of Course Materials:
LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:  If you do not have access to a computer, please notify instructor as soon as possible. If you are TDY and security measures prevent this, please notify instructor in advance so that prior arrangements can be made

The syllabus is given out well in advance of the research and exam deadlines. Late submissions will automatically be graded 5 points less. No assignment will be accepted 1 week past the due date. No assignments will be accepted after the end of course, unless it is a pre-approved Incomplete.

***Excused absences will cause you to lose 3 points in participation points per night; unexcused absences will cause you to lose 8 points in participation points per night.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
I. Cell Phones:  As a courtesy to your fellow students and instructor, please turn off all cell phones and pagers during the instructional period.

II. Tardiness and unexcused absences:  Two unexcused absences will result in an Involuntary Withdrawal and a grade of “F” for the course.  Excessive tardiness will have a negative impact on the final grade.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
JANUARY 14
I.    Introduction
     Lecture:  “The Literature of Slavery and  
     Freedom”  pp. 127-136
II.   In-Class Activities
     Read pp. 5-7 (Spirituals)
     Were You There”  p. 7
     “Soon I Will Be Done”  p. 11      
                     (Listen to CD Audio)
     “No More Auction Block” p. 12
      Read and discuss pp. 16-17 (Gospel)               Read: “This Little Light of Mine”  
                      p. 17
Listen to CD Audio of “Take My Hand”(p. 20)
Read and discuss “Peace Be Still”  p. 21
Small group interpretation: Francis E. W.
               Harper's
“Bury Me in a Free Land”  p. 417

       Listen to various Native American songs
III. Homework
               Read Sojourner Truth's “Ain't I a Woman"
               p. 198   and
Read Victor Sejour's “The Mulatto”         p. 286   and
               Read Booker T. Washington's   “Up From  
               Slavery”   p. 488 or
Read W. E. B. DuBois's “The Damnation of
               Women”  p. 740
             
               Read: handouts on Native American poetry
               and Asian American poetry
               
       **Plagiarism prevention quiz (10 points) (due
       January 21)

WEEK 2____________________________________________________

JANUARY 21
I. Discuss homework assignment
Lecture:   The Literature to the New Negro
           Renaissance
The Blues
       Lecture on “The Harlem Renaissance” and Folktales
    Langston Hughes's passages
    Marita Bonner's passage:   “On Being Young -
            A Woman - and Colored”   p. 1206

II. In-class activities
Paul Laurance Dunbar's “Worn Out”             p. 887
“The Colored Soldiers”  p. 889
“The Haunted Oak”        p. 901

Small group interpretation: “The Fourth of July
       and Race Outrages”p. 905
Listen to CD audio “St. Louis Blues” p. 24
“See, See Rider”  p.  27
“Backwater Blues”  p. 29
Read “Going to Chicago Blues”       p. 34

Listen to CD audio of  Duke Ellington's  “It Don't
       Mean a Thing. . .and Andy Razaf's  “What Did I do
       to be So. . .” read along starts on pages 57and 58

       Listen to CD audio* (Teacher's) from Mo' Better
       Blues .... “Harlem Blues”

       Read excerpt from Oscar Hijuelo "Empress of the
       splendid season"

III. Homework

Read passage on Jessie Redmon Fauset    pp. 951-960
Read passage on Alain Locke               pp.960-970
Read passage on Georgia Douglas Johnson    pp. 970-972
Read  Zora Neale Hurston's
“Why the Sister in Black Works Hardest” and
“Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men”  p. 111

        Download from webiliography on parkonline.org
        Read excerpt from Tom McCourt's "Angela's Ashes"
        (Irish American)

        Read handout excerpt from Mario Vargos Llosa "Way
        to Paradise"

WEEK 3__________________________________________________

JANUARY 28
I. Discussion of homework
       Lecture on Realism, Naturalism, Modernism
       Discuss Robert Hayden's “Soledad”  p. 1511

II. Guest speakers:  author Mary Burns Michael (African
       American "Through the Eyes of a Storyteller)

       Poet Angela de Hoyos (Mexican American)

III. Homework read Martin Luther King, Jr.'s
“Letter from Birmingham Jail”   p. 1854

       Read handouts on Juan Flores (Puerto Rican)
         "Rappin', Writin', and Breakin',” “Living
          Borders/Buscando América"

       Read handout excerpt from Alfredo Vea's "Gods Go
         Begging" (Mexican American)
 
WEEK 4__________________________________________________

FEBRUARY 4
I. Discuss homework

II. Lecture: Listen to CD   “I Have a Dream” speech read along starts on page 80

       Read excerpts from "Charlie Chan is Dead: An
       Anthology of Contemporary Asian American Fiction"
       edited by Jessica Hagedom

III. Midterm exam

WEEK 5__________________________________________________

FEBRUARY 11
I. Go over exam
II. Lecture:  The Black Arts Movement

III. In-class Activities
View excerpt from the movie “Panther”
Discuss:  Amiri Baraka passages (TBA)
Eldridge Cleaver passages            (TBA)
Maulana Karenga pp. 1972-1977
“What is Kwanzaa?”
Listen to CD of Malcom X's “The Ballot or the  
       Bullet”read along starts on page 90

       Go to Parkonline.org (Webliography) to download
       Read and discuss: Cesar Chavez's (Mexican
       American) 1968 speech in
       New York at Calvary Episcopal Church)

       
IV. Homework
       Read Nikki Giovanni's “Beautiful Black Men” p.  
       1984 and
“Nikki-Rosa”  p. 1984  
       Read Carolyn M. Rodgers's   “For Sistuhs Wearin'  
       Straight Hair”p. 2010
         
       Read and discuss: Excerpt from Native American
       writer Joy Harjo from
       "Autobiography"

       Read handout on Meena Alexander (East Indian
       American) and poetry from "Faulty Lines"

       Read and discuss excerpt from African-American
       writer Maya Angelou "I Know Why the Caged Bird
       Sings"

Team Assessment  (60 points):
a. Select characteristics and prepare a matrix comparing and contrasting 3 eras reflecting diversity in literature. Periods defined in the context of the African-American literary period could be used as a foundation for comparative purposes. Characteristics for possible consideration are major historical events during period; literary theme of the era; or how writers addressed issues of race, gender, , women's rights, nation, slavery, and citizenship; etc. Aside from your textbook, use 3 other sources to derive information per era. Be thorough in your presentation (Due February 21).  This will be the basis for your week 8 team presentation. This section is worth 40 points)

b. Team will present a PowerPoint presentation discussing 3 eras. Be creative in your presentations: i.e. include videos, music, or art. Time limit:  no more than 30 minutes. This section is worth 20 points. (Due March 4)

WEEK 6____________________________________________________

FEBRUARY 21

I. Discussion of homework
II. Lecture:  Literature since 1970 Lecture on Jazz and Rap
III. In-class activities
Read Lucille Clifton's “Homage to My Hips”
p. 2223
Read June Jordan's “The Female and the Silence
of a Man”     p. 2235
Read Alice Walker's  “Good Night, Willie Lee, I'll
See You in the Morning”    p. 2380
Read Wanda Coleman's    “Emmett Till”   p. 2473

Listen to CD audio of King Pleasure's  “Parker's
            Mood”
read along passage starts on page 59
Listen to James Brown selection
Listen to CD audio of  Grandmaster Flash and the
            Furious Five:     “The Message”
read along passage starts on p. 62

       Go to Parkonline.org (Webliography) to download

       Read and discuss pieces from Native American writer
       Joy Harjo

       "Deer Dancer"
       "Equinox"

       Read and discuss excerpt from "The Warrior Woman",
       by Chinese-American writer Maxine Hong Kingston
       
IV. Homework
Read: Maya Angelou's "I know why the caged bird
       sings” pp. 2040-
Read: Al Young   pp. 2313-2317
“A Dance for Ma Rainey”
“Conjugal Visits”
Read: Alice Walker pp. 2375-2377
               excerpt from "The Color Purple"
Read: Walter Moseley pp. 2594-2607
“Devil in a Blue Dress”

       Read excerpts (handouts)from:
       Amy Tan:   "Joy Luck Club" (Chinese American)
       Luis Alberto Urrea's excerpt from "The Devil's
       Highway" (Mexican American)

       Read poetry handouts featuring
       James Masao Mitsui(Japanese American)

       Read and discuss excerpt from "Dark Blue Suit and
       Other Stories" by Peter Bacho (Filipino American)
       
***Individual Assessment (50 points):

Using 6 literary elements, interpret, compare, and contrast 2 pieces of literature representing two American ethnic groups. (Due week 7). Paper should be between 1200 – 1500 words. See rubric for additional information. Your paper should be able to address this question: How do these pieces of literature contribute to the oral/written history of American society?  (Due February 28)

WEEK 7___________________________________________________

FEBRUARY  28
I. Discuss homework
II. Lecture:   Sermons
       Read C.L. Franklin's  “The Eagle Stirreth Her
       Nest”  p. 71

       Go to Parkonline.org (Webliography) to download
       Native American writers:
       Read:  "All is Finished" by Chief Dan George Salish
              "Eagle Hunter" by Longtail

       Read and discuss poetry handouts featuring Richard
       Rodriguez (Mexican American)
       
III. View excerpts from “A Color Purple”, and "Joy Luck
       Club"

       In your teams, compare and contrast written and
       visual imaging of the relationship among the
       women. Select 5 elements of literature to support
       your presentation of ideas to the class.
       
IV. Homework: Prepare for Team Presentations
WEEK 8___________________________________________________

MARCH 4
I. Final Exam
II. Presentations by groups

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

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