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CS 351 Computer Operating Systems
Schubel, Henry R.,, Jr.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseCS 351 Computer Operating Systems LU
SemesterF1U2005
FacultySchubel, Henry R.,,Jr.
TitleAdjunct Faculty
Degrees/CertificatesBS Business Administration - Computer Science & Marketing
MBA - Management
Office LocationLuke AFB
Office Hours7:00pm - 7:30pm
Daytime Phone480-451-3601
E-MailHSchubel@park.edu
HenrySchubel@Cox.Net
Semester Dates08/22/2005 to 10/16/2005
Class Days-M-W---
Class Time7:30 - 10:10 PM
PerquisitesCS219
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Modern Operating Systems, Second Edition
Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall, 2001

Additional Resources:
Operating Systems - A Systematic View
 William Davis, Addison-Wesley 1984
Operating Systems - H. Lorin & H. Deitel
 Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Menlo Park Ca, 1981


Course Description:
This course presents the theory of operating systems and an overview of  one or more operating system environments.  Operating system concepts  covered should include (but are not limited to):  process management,  memory management, I/O management, file management, and security.   Theory concepts will be put into practice with exercises, some requiring  college algebra skills and/or basic programming knowledge. Operating  system environments may include (but are not limited to): Windows, UNIX,  and Linux. Prerequisite: CS219. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
To prepare the student with a basic grasp of the basic components of today's computer operating systems, and lay foundation for the study of tomorrow's OS designs.

Learning Outcomes:

* To provide the student with a basic identification of hardware/software components common to all computer systems and operating systems.
* To examine those components that embrace technology and methodology that span multiple components of a typical computer system.
* To examine practical problems in the evolution of Computer operating systems and to discect solutions to those problems.
* To reinforce the foundation obtained from prerequisite courses and build upon that foundation.

Course Assessment:
Your course grade will be determined from traditional written examinations.  There will be three regular exams during the course, as outlined in the meeting schedule, the last being on our final meeting night, each exam will be on the order of 140 points.  There will also be two "no score/no foul" quizes, so you are better prepared for the types of questions you will encounter on examinations.

Grading:
Three Exams @ 140 points = 420 points

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
If you're late, take your seat quietly.  If you are disruptive in the classroom, you will find I have no sense of humor.  I've taught this course multiple times and the evenings are very busy evenings.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Text    Chapters 1 (Introduction), and
       Chapter 5 for Wednesday

Aug 22  Course Introduction
       Identification of major System Resources;
       Hardware & Software
       Review of DASD's, focus on Disc Technology
       Preparation of a fresh disc for use.  
       A view of a crashed disc.

Aug 24  Review of Disc sub-system, Disc I/O drivers
       Development of I/O Macro's and IOCS
       Standard Data Management Techniques
       Disc Space Management Concepts (DOS & OS)

Text    Read Chapter 2 (Processes and Threads) carefully

Aug 29  Device management for sharable and
       non-sharable devices.
       System Routines and Transients
       Supervisor calls for disc I/O,
       non I/O supervisor calls
       A Single Task DOS Supervisor
       Spooling Facility; Tape Labels Facility

Aug 31  Main Memory Management Concepts
       Loaders, Schedulers, and Run Time monitors
       Development of Multiprogramming
       A review of several vendor offerings past and
       present...  IBM SYS/3 Model 6, IBM SYS/3 Model 10,
       IBM SYS/3 Model 15, UNIVAC OS/3, Perkin-Elmer
       OS-32/MT, IBM System 360 DOS, IBM System 370/DOS &
       DOS-VSE, IBM OS/MFT, IBM OS/MVT, IBM CMS,
       Hewlett-Packard MPE, and IBM VM, DOS, & Windows.

Sept 05 I honor Labor Day.    You'd be asleep anyway!

Sept 07 Structural Elements of the Run-time Environment.
       Concept of a System Resource, see Chapter 6,
       section 6.1

       Discussion of Hewlett-Packard capability for local
       and global resource coordination; Deadlocking.
       Applications discussion.

Sept 12 Intertask communications - Applications discussion.
       Focus on other Operating Systems components:
       ...System Console Management, Command Interpreter,
       Command Processor, Error Detection and Action.  
       Examination of Job Control Languages for
       IBM SYS/3, IBM SYS/370, Perkin-Elmer OS-32/MT,
       and HP MPE.

       Lecture will be about 1 hour.  
       Remainder of class spent in review.

Text    Read Chapters 2 (Processes and Threads)

Sept 14 Examination #1 - last 1.5 hours of class

Sept 19 Review Examination
 &     The Operating System Kernel
Sept 21 Interrupts, Dispatch Queue, I/O coordination,
       Processor Management & Scheduling Tasks.

Text    Read Chapters 4 (Basic Memory Management and
       Virtual Memory Organization)

Sept 26 Main Memory Management Techniques
 &     Single Contiguous Allocation, Partitioned Memory,
Sept 28 Roll-in Roll-out Allocation, Segmented Memory,
       Paged Memory, swapping and thrashing about,
       and MS-DOS and Windows.
       In-class simulations for memory management.

Oct 03  Examination #2   Read Chapter 2, section 2.3

Oct 05  OS Support - System Utilities, System
       Configurator, and Initiator.  
       Data Communications overview.  
       Review Exam #2

Text    Read Chapters 5, section 5.3 on interrupts

Oct 10  Communications Sub-system
       Asynchronous, Synchronous, IBM Bi-sync, SDLC
       Processor-to-Processor Communications.
       Additional Topics in Process Scheduling
       Virtual Machines - A look at IBM VM...
       multiprogramming with Operating Systems!
       An in depth look at software deadlocks: cause,
       detection, corrective action for recovery,
       and preventive measures.

       The remainder of the class to be used for a rapid
       review of all course material in preparation for
       the final exam.

Oct 12  Final Examination - Entire class period.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
NOTE: An attendance report of ā€œPā€ (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
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