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CJ 450 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice
Schneider, Sally A.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 450 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

Semester

S2D 2006 DA

Faculty

Schneider, Sally A.

Office Location

SDII 06

Office Hours

TBD

E-Mail

Sally.Schneider@pirate.park.edu.

Semester Dates

March 27 - May 21, 2006

Class Days

-M-W---

Class Time

4:45 - 7:25 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Hickey, Thomas J. "Taking Side:  Crashing Views in Crime and Criminology." 7th edition. McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,  Dubuque, Iowa 2001.


Course Description:
Current issues and trends in criminal justice with emphasis on group discussion. Each student will be required to prepare, submit and defend a senior thesis. Successful completion of the thesis is mandatory. This course will satisfy the EN306 requirement for Criminal Justice majors. Pre-requisites: EN105, EN106, passing the WCT and senior standing. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The philosophy for this course is one of interactiveness based on lectures, instruction, and group discussions.  Students will be able to achieve class objectives by writing a thesis and defending it along with leading group discussions concerning current criminal justice trends.  The instructor believes that students learn by active participation and working together as a team.  Teamwork along with mutual respect is conducive to learning and promotes a harmonious atmosphere where everyone counts.  The instructor will encourage students to express their opinions without fear of ridicule which inititates dialogues.  A good sense of humor is also encouraged.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Assess the ethical and value questions in the criminal justice system.
  2. Criticize factual situations, applying this knowledge.
  3. Improve the ability to effectively gather, evaluate, and communicate information (in both written and oral forms), including the use of the Internet for communication and research.
  4. Design and construct the research, writing and defense of a thesis.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the skills needed to identify, research, and debate current issues and trends in Criminal Justice.
  2. Explain why existing policies associated with the “War on Drugs” aren't effective in reducing both drug abuse and drug-related crime.
  3. Recognize the trends associated with the rediscovery of the basic needs and interests of crime victims.
  4. Explain how current intervention strategies:  community policing, problem solving techniques, and policy implications may lessen the growth of illegal gang activities.
  5. Explain the reasons why Juvenile Justice has undergone a major transformation in recent years.
  6. Identify the three models of Juvenile Justice that have emerged which will characterize the Juvenile Court of the future.
  7. Explain how court decisions, legislative efforts, and law enforcement remedies attempt to control pornography.
  8. Recognize the various ways that the media reports about criminality and how it influences the public perceptions of crime.
  9. Explain how the prevalence of domestic violent crimes have changed the police, courts, and legislators to change their response to domestic violence.
  10. Evaluate the aspects of the present debate concerning the constitutionality of the death penalty.
  11. Identify the issues relevant to prison privatization in the twenty-first century.
  12. Recognize the scope of jail and prison crowding and evaluate the reform measures being implemented.
  13. Evaluate current sentencing procedures of offenders and explain the impact it has on prison populations and prison management.
  14. Identify changes needed in the Criminal Justice system concerning the increase of criminality of women offenders.
  15. Explain how race and gender influences decisions made in the Criminal Justice system and how these problems may be resolved.
  16. Write a thesis.
  17. Design and construct the research, writing and defense of a thesis.
  18. Improve the ability to effectively gather, evaluate, and communicate information (in both written and oral forms), including the use of the Internet for commmunication and research.
  19. Assess the ethical and value questions in the criminal justice system.
  20. Criticize factual situations, applying this knowledge.
Class Assessment:
1.  Articles:  Three written articles from your assigned textbook will be required.  The articles will be typed, two pages in length, and may be double-spaced.  Students will lead a group discussion of their topics.  The articles will count as 30% of your final grade. Guidelines concerning how to write and present the articles will be discussed in class along with their due dates.

2.  Write and defend a thesis.  The thesis will count as 60% of your final grade.

3.  Thesis Requirements:

(a)  A current issue or trend in criminal justice will be your topic.
(b)  The instructor must approve your topic.
(c)  The thesis must be 12 pages in length, excluding bibliography, appendices, etc.
(d)  The thesis must be typed and may be doubled-spaced.
(e)  Use at least ten (10) sources with only five of the sources being
from the Internet.  
(f)  Make an outline for your thesis.
(g)  Prepare a draft thesis (Body Only).
(h)  Give a 15-minute presentation in class, defending your thesis.

4.  Your thesis must contain the following:
(a)  Title Page
(b)  Abstract
(c)  Text, including introduction
(d)  Methods, results, and discussions
(e)  Summary/Conclusion
(f)  References
(g)  Appendices, Pictures, Diagrams, Tables, etc.  
(h)  Footnotes, etc.

5.   No written examinations will be given in this course!!!

Grading:
1.  Written Thesis – 60%

2.  Articles – 30%

3.  Attendance/Participation – 10%

4.  Total Percent - 100%

5.  Final Grade Criterion:

     100-90 = A
      80-89 = B
      70-79 = C
      60-69 = D
   Below-59 = F

Note:  Breakdown of the grading policy on the thesis and articles will be provided to the students.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All written assignments are due on their due dates.  If you will not be attending class on that date, you must leave the paper etc., with personnel from Park University.  All late papers will receive a ten (10%) percent reduction for each day it is tardy.

Extra credit is only allowed with emergency situations and excused absences.

If you feel that you need extra help in understanding this course, please contact me so I can provide assistance.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner.  Please be respectful of your instructor and classmates.  Students are expected to maintain the classroom and library in a neat, clean, and orderly fashion.  Since this class is held in the DMAFB library, please obey all library rules of conduct.  Library orientation will be provided to the students.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
March 27:  Introduction Review of Syllabus, and Library  
          Orientation.
          Assignments of Article Topics along with their
          due dates.
          Overview of Textbook "Contents in Brief."

March 29:  GROUP DISCUSSION
          PART I - Definitions and Explanation of Crime
          Issue 1 - Is Crime Always Functional?
          Issue 2 - Is Criminal Behavior Biologically
                    determined?
          Issue 3 - Does IQ Significantly Contribute to
                    Crime?
          Issue 4 - Is Street Crime More Serious than
                    White Collar Crime

April 03:  GROUP DISCUSSION
          PART 2 - Justice Issues and Contemporary Public
                   Policy.
          Issue 5 - Does Arresting Spousal Batterers Do
                    More Harm Than Good?
          Issue 6 - Is Racial Profiling an Acceptable Law
                    Enforcement Strategy?
          Issue 7 - Should Serious Sex Offenders Be
                    Castrated?
          Issue 8 - Should Juvenile Courts Be Abolished?
          Issue 9 - Are the Dangers of Child Pornography
                    Exaggerated?

April 05:  GROUP DISCUSSION
          PART 3 - Prison Programs and Alternatives
          Issue 10 - Is the Segregation of HIV-Positive
                     Inmates Ethical?
          Issue 11 - Are Conjugal and Family
                     Visitations Effective
                     Rehabilitative Concepts?
          Issue 12 - Should Serial Killers and Violent
                     Sexual Predators Be Quarantined
                     For Life?  

April 10:  GROUP DISCUSSION
          PART 4 - Criminal Justice Research, Evaluation,
                   and Policy Analysis.
          Issue 13 - Is Capital Punishment Bad Public
                     Policy?
          Issue 14 - Do More Guns Lead to Less Crime?
          Issue 15 - Should the Police Enforce Zero-
                     Tolerance Laws?

April 12:  GROUP DISCUSSION
          Issue 16 - Should Marijuana Be Legalized?
          Issue 17 - Do "Get Tough" Approaches Really
                     Work?
          Issue 18 - Should Juries Be Able To Disregard
                     the Law and Free "Guilty" Persons
                     in Racially Charged Cases?
          Issue 19 - Should Behavior Modification
                     Techniques Be Used To Brainwash
                     Criminals?

April 17:  INSTRUCTION:
          1.  How to Write and Develop A Thesis.
          2.  How to Select and Manage A Thesis Topic.
          3.  How to Utilize Resource Materials When
              Writing A Thesis.
          4.  Handouts Will Be Provided.

April 19:  FIELD TRIP - State Prison, Tucson, AZ.

April 24:  DISCUSSION OF FIELD TRIP.
          Students Will Begin Their Outlines and Collect
          Resource Materials.

April 26:  OUTLINE OF THESIS DUE/ Begin Writing Draft
          Thesis.

May 01:  Continue Writing Draft Thesis.

May 03:  Continue Writing Draft Thesis.

May 08:  DRAFT THESIS DUE/ Begin Writing Final Thesis.

May 10:  Continue Writing Final Draft Thesis.

May 15:  PRESENTATION OF THESIS
        Along With Group Discussion of Each Thesis.

May 17:  PRESENTATION OF THESIS
        Along With Group Discussion of Each Thesis.

NOTE:    STUDENTS WILL BE ADVISED OF ANY CHANGES TO THE
        SYLLABUS.

        INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION AND GUIDANCE WILL BE
        PROVIDED AT ALL CLASSES CONCERNING THE THESIS.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

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