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SO 302 The Study of the Family
Misener, Catherine


Instructor:

 

email: 

 

phone: 


Term:

Catherine Misener

 

Catherine.Misener@pirate.park.edu

misenerpark@aol.com (alternate email)

(734) 327-9577 (Home, Eastern Time)

Fall I, 2005

August 22nd - October 16th

 

Instructor Information

 

Park University Vision

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Park University Mission

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Welcome to SO 302 - Study of the Family - This course offers a study of the family as a social institution and a social group in terms of cross-cultural, historical, and contemporary perspectives. Current controversies concerning male-female roles, sexual morality, reproduction and other issues are considered. 

Welcome to the Park University course The Study of the Family, online! The purpose of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the impact of societal changes on the definition and functioning of the family and to encourage students to think critically about the structures and patterns of family relationships.

This course is a Multi-Cultural Liberal Learning course in the Park University curriculum and, as such, intends to enhance an understanding of the family from the perspective of other cultures and seeks to enable the student to make informed judgments about the major issues facing families today.

Please read the syllabus carefully. As an enrolled student, you are expected to read the assigned text, complete the assignments and interact online with the instructor and your fellow students. I look forward to sharing this experience with you, as together we examine the changes in cultural values, norms and attitudes that have occurred in recent decades and determine the impact these changes have had on the family.

NOTE: Students are encouraged to print a hard copy of the syllabus immediately following confirmation of their registration.

Learning Objectives:

  • To give a complete and far-reaching understanding of sociology of marriage and family.
  • To bridge all elements of the course, including intimate relationships, family policy, and family issues.
  • To encouraging students to consider their own ideas and beliefs.
  • To combine cross-cultural studies and research, with the more applied study of relationships.
  • To dispel myths about societal differences and to broaden the students' experience with coverage and discussion of families that break from the "societal norm".
  • To provide a balanced coverage of contributions from both men and women, enabling students to see "the family experience" from both gender perspectives.
  • To give students a fundamental understanding of the sociological research in the area of marriage and family.

Skolnick, A. S., & Skolnick, J.H. (2005). Family in Transition (13th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

ISBN: 0-205-41823-6
Text Ordering:
http://direct.mbsbooks.com/park.htm

Image of cover of text

 

 

Online Course Policies:

Policy #1:  Submission of Work:

  • A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday 12:01 am EST and Sunday at 11:59 PM EST. The first week begins the first day of the term/semester. Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed and successfully submitted by the posted due date.
  • Create a back up file of every piece of work you submit for grading. This will ensure that a computer glitch or a glitch in cyberspace won't erase your efforts.
  • When files are sent attached to an email, the files should be in either Microsoft Word, RTF or PDF file formats.   

Policy #2: Ground Rules for Online Communication & Participation

  • General email: Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. When sending email other than assignments, you must identify yourself fully by name and class in all email sent to your instructor and/or other members of our class.
  • Online threaded discussions: are public messages and all writings in this area will be viewable by the entire class or assigned group members.
  • Online Instructor Response Policy:  Online Instructors will check email frequently and will respond to course-related questions within 24-48 hours.
  • Observation of "Netiquette": All your Online communications need to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact.  Spelling and grammar are very important in an Online course.  What you put into an Online course reflects on your level of professionalism.  Here are a couple of Online references that discuss writing Online http://goto.intwg.com/ and netiquette http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.
  • Please check the Announcements area before you ask general course "housekeeping" questions (i.e. how do I submit assignment 3?).  If you don't see your question there, then please contact your instructor. 

Policy #3: What to do if you experience technical problems or have questions about the Online classroom.  

  • If you experience computer difficulties (need help downloading a browser or plug-in, you need help logging into the course, or if you experience any errors or problems while in your Online course, click on the button in your Online Classroom, then click on the helpdesk menu item, and then fill out the form or call the helpdesk for assistance. 
  • If the issue is preventing you from submitting or completing any coursework, contact your instructor immediately.

Policy #4: DISABILITY GUIDELINES:  Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.

Additional information concerning the criteria for special assistance and Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability.

 

Course Requirements: 

Students are responsible for: 

1.  Completing all readings and lectures. You will find a course calendar below, which provides you with your weekly readings. I will post a lecture to the online classroom every Monday for that academic week and Final Comments on Sunday of each Academic Week.

2.  Participating in the class conference through discussion of topics introduced by the instructor and responding to submissions by classmates. You are required to submit at least three postings/replies to the input from other students each week (this is in addition to your own responses to the discussion questions).

3.  Completing two personal reaction assignments.  See below for more information.

4.  Submitting a Course Research Paper.  See below for more information.  You are also required to submit your topic for approval by Week Three and an outline by Week Five.

5.  Completing the proctored exam. This will be an objective, final examination that is given the last week of class. See the Proctored Exam section of the syllabus for more information.

GRADING POLICIES

 

Class Participation

30%

Personal Reaction Assignments

20%

Course Research Paper (total)

30%

Proctored Exam

20%

 

Class Participation is based on your responses to weekly discussion questions posted on the class discussion board and on your replies to other students' posted responses. Each week I will post questions to the entire class on the discussion board. You are responsible for logging onto the course, reading and responding to the questions posted. I will not grade each response individually, but will consider the totality of your input to the discussion boards. You must log in and respond to the discussion questions each week to receive full credit for Class Participation.

Personal Reaction Assignments – You are required to submit a total of TWO Personal Reaction Asignments throughout the term.  You will be given a choice of four different personal reaction assignments from which to choose – you can select any two to respond to and submit.  The due dates for each assignment are posted in the Weekly Calendar below. 

An assignment may be to respond to a question posed at the end of a chapter; observe something "sociological in nature and report your observations" (more on that later); visit a website relevant to that week's readings.  More info on the assignments will be provided during the first week of class, including how they are graded.  ALL PERSONAL REACTION ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE SUBMITTED AS AN ATTACHED WORD FILE IN THE DROPBOX.  I WILL NOT ACCEPT OR GRADE ASSIGNMENTS SUBMITTED IN THE COMMENTS SECTION OF THE DROPBOX.  If you are having trouble attaching a file you should first contact tech support as they can better help with technical problems.  Do not wait until the last moment to try and submit your assignment – late points are deducted for work submitted past the due date.

Research Paper - The Research Paper is to be six to eight pages in length and focus on a topic related to the family. The topic needs to be selected and discussed with the instructor by the third week of the class and an outline submitted by week five.  You will receive up to 2 points for submitting the topic and up to 3 points for submitting the outline.  These two requirements will make up 5% of the research paper grade.  The actual research paper will constitute the other 25% of the research paper grade. 

At least five sources are to be used to write the paper. The sources are to be properly cited using APA Style in the body of the essay and included in a list of References at the end of the paper.  If you do not cite your sources, this is essentially plagiarism and will result in a grade of zero on the research paper.  At least THREE of the sources must be academic articles. I will provide more information on acceptable resources in the course and guidance on how to find such sources.

You are required to use Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1 margins. 

The Course Research Paper is due by midnight, E.T., on the FRIDAY OF WEEK SEVEN!!! Late research papers will be docked 2 points per day.  If you do not use the required font and margins, they will be changed prior to grading your paper.  This is done to ensure all students are graded fairly (in terms of the 6-8 page requirement, as some fonts and/or larger margins will seem to yield the required pages when there is actually not the same amount of work submitted).

Very important information about your Course Research Paper.  While you must use outside resources (and properly cite said sources) to support your points, your paper should primarily be in your own words.  You cannot reply on direct quotes or paraphrasing the words of others.  NO MORE THAN 20% of you paper should include direct quotes and paraphrased text from outside sources.  If more than 20% of your paper is direct quotes and/or paraphrasing 10 points will be deducted from your paper. 

I will run ALL papers through a plagiarism software program.  If you work is plagiarized, you will RECEIVE A ZERO ON YOUR COURSE RESEARCH PAPER.  Additionally, you must explore a topic approved by the instructor.  If your topic was not approved, you may not receive credit for the research paper.  The paper must address topics and issues related to the course material.  This is why you must submit the topic for approval by the third week of class.  I will give you feedback on how best to approach the topic and ways to ensure it is related to the course material.  Feel free to contact me sooner to discuss your topic!

Here is a breakdown on the Research Paper:

1.      6-8 pages of text

2.      Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1 margins

3.      Use at least five academic resources (combination of valid websites and academic articles)

4.      Cite throughout your essay and in your References using APA (this means you must cite your resources within the body of the essay where used and at the end of your paper in a References section)

5.      Due the FRIDAY OF WEEK SEVEN

You are to list the web sites in proper American Psychological Association (APA) Style, as if you were citing the web sites as references in a research paper.  Information about using APA Style to cite references may be found on the following web pages:

        http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html

        http://webster.commnet.edu/apa/apa_index.htm

        http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html

        http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ddegelman/index.cfm?doc_id=796

 

Proctored Final Exam

Park University requires the completion of a significant exam in the presence of an approved proctor by each student who is enrolled in an Internet course. Approved proctors shall include testing center administrators; K-12 teachers, counselors or administrators; certified librarians; U.S. Embassy officials; military test control officers or unit education officers; and accredited college or university faculty members or administrators. Excluded from approval as proctors shall be family members, friends, neighbors, employers, supervisors, coworkers, clergy or other students and adjunct faculty members at colleges or universities. Preferred proctors are staff at Park’s campus centers. Students within one hour driving distance of a Park University campus should request a proctor from that campus.  Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website. 

It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor who will be accepted and approved by the instructor. For these proctored examinations, photo identification is required. The completed proctor form must be received by the instructor and the proctor approved before the exam may be taken. Instructions for completing the proctor form may be found at: http://captain.park.edu/portal/studentinstr.htm.

The exam will be sent to the proctor with instructions for administration. The exam must be completed in the presence of the proctor during the eighth week of the term and returned by the proctor to the instructor.  The student may not return the paper to the instructor.

You will have two hours to complete the exam. You may use a computer to take the exam and the proctor may email me the finished product. The exam will be a closed book, closed note exam consisting of multiple choice and short response questions. Per university policy, failure to take the exam will result in a grade of F for the course.

Other Information on proctored exams:

  • It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor. 
  • Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor. 
  • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval. 
  • Failure to take a proctored final exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade. 
  • Some Graduate Online courses may not require a proctored Final.

 

 

GRADING RUBRICS

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Each week you will have one or more discussion questions posted in the conference area.  You are required to respond to each discussion question posted no later than Sunday, midnight E.T. of that academic week.  Each response to the discussion question is worth UP TO 2 points. You will have 12 discussion questions throughout the term, although that is subject to change!!

Here is how the points are determined:

•           2 points:  An excellent response that is extremely thorough and detailed.  Every part of the question is addressed and specific examples are cited (if applicable to the question).  Your response is clearly tied in to the course material and you mention specific lectures, articles, and/or outside sources (at least one of the three, when applicable).  You can share your own personal experiences if they relate to the question, but the focus of your response is supported by material from the course.  Typically responses that earn the full 2 points are at least 200 words in length.

•           1.5 points:  A good response that offers some detail.  All parts of the question are addressed, but some parts of your response are not as strong as others.  You might have mentioned only one source (article, lecture, outside sources) when clearly there were more than one that would have supported your response.  Usually responses that earn 1.5 points are less than 200 words.

•           1 point:  This response did not address every part of the question. The response was not supported with any resources (articles, lectures, etc.).  This response might have provided a relevant personal experience, but did not fully address the complete question or back up the experience with course material.

I assign points anywhere between 1 – 2.  For example, a 1.8 would be given to a very thorough response that is just shy from being fully supported.  Of course, if your work is not posted or is late (and we did not have a prior arrangement for late work) then no points are given.

You might be tempted to skip a discussion question, especially if you having a very difficult week.  While two points might not seem like a big deal, the points can either add up quickly or not!  By this I mean students have been just 1 point shy of the next letter grade.  Your class participation question is a combination of your responses to the discussion questions and your comments to others in the class (see below for more info).  While I am providing you with very detailed grading criteria in an attempt to help all students make their best effort, realize that your class participation grade is looked at as a whole – it is really impossible to completely separate the discussion questions from the participation part.  Often as I read your postings to other students I will go back and revise your discussion question grade (for the better) as I see you clearly know more than was apparent in the discussion response.  What I am trying to say is this:  you must complete your work and be an active part in the class dialog to receive full credit for your class participation grade.

CLASS PARTICIPATION

Each week you are required to post – AT THE MINIMUM – three replies to the work of other students.  You can offer your peer responses in just one thread (if there are two or more questions) or you can offer some peer replies in one thread and the rest in another. I prefer you offer comments in all the threads, as this does foster stronger dialog among students.  Posting more responses, of a high quality, will help ensure a higher participation grade.  Each week you can earn up to 2 points for your class participation.

 

•           2 points:  Offers more than three replies to the work of other students.  Also responds to any other questions I might pose in the discussion question threads (follow-up questions that are not required, but can help with our class part. grade).  Each response is of a high quality.  This means your comments are very specific and detailed.  If you agree or disagree with a student’s comments/work, then you provide specific reasons as to why.  You might offer another example to support our views or that of the student to which you are responding.  Usually these comments are 100 words (this is really not that many words). 

•           1.5 points:  Offers three replies to the work of other students.  Replies are about 75-100 words and offer very specific replies to the comments of other students (see above).

•           1 point:  Offers less than three replies to the work of other students.  Replies are usually less than 75 words and somewhat generic.  Statements like I agree with what you said or I don’t understand what you mean or don’t agree with your comments. 

•           .5 point:  Responds to one comment or not at all, but does post his or her own responses to discussion questions.

 

PERSONAL REACTION ASSIGNMENTS (two are required, up to ten points each)  A solid and thorough reaction should comprise 2 1/2 - 3 1/2  double spaced pages of text (Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1 margins).

 

•           9 out of 10:  Excellent response that addresses every part of the question(s) thoroughly. You provide examples and/or sources from the text and/or outside material (this depends on the question). You go beyond describing and offer a detailed discussion of the topics.

•           8.4 - 8.9:  Again, an excellent response but perhaps you did not offer as many examples or use the material from your text when discussing your views. If there were two or more parts to the question then you did not provide as strong a reply for all the parts.

•           8 – 8.4:  Great response that was just lacking a one or two areas - perhaps you did not use material from the text or outside sources. You might have offered your own views without backing them up or did not spend as much time really discussing your thoughts.  Given to work that does a great job of listing or describing the issues, but does not really discuss them in great detail.

•           7.5 – 7.9: Good work that addresses almost every part of the question but does not really go into detail. Little or no examples offered (or material from the text and/or outside sources).

•           7 – 7.4:  You addressed most parts of the question, but did not go into details. You might have only listed one or two areas for discussion, when clearly more could have been said about the topics. You did not address every part of the question in any length. You did not provide examples or perhaps only offered something of personal experience without relating it to the topics or backing it up.

•           6.5 – 6.9:  You only responded to one part of the question. You might have done a good job with that part, but if you do not address the rest of the assignment your grade will suffer.

•           6 – 6.4:  You only responded to one part of the question.  Your work did not adequately respond to that one part. 

•           Below 6.5  You did not respond to the question or only provided personal experiences that are not really related to the issues at hand.  Only submitted one or two paragraphs for your response. 

COURSE RESEARCH PAPER

Here is a point by point breakdown of your research paper.  It is due by midnight, E.T., on the FRIDAY of Week Seven!!!

Points will be assigned on the following criteria:

           2 points:  Thesis Statement clearly specified

           5 points:  Strong connection is made between the topic and issue (s) we have explored in the course

           5 points:  Support provided for the thesis through the comments of the writer and use of appropriate references

           5 points:  Writing is clear and concise.  The points the author wishes to make are logically presented

           4 points:  Sources are properly cited in the body of the paper and correctly listed in the Reference section following APA style

           4 points:  Proper spelling, punctuation and grammar employed throughout the paper

In addition to ways you can ensure points are accumulated for your research paper, points will be deducted per the guidelines below:

 

            2 points:  For each paper less than the page requirement (for example, if you have less than six pages of text (per the required font and margins) up to two points will be deducted per missing page)

            2 points: Missing your name (I really do not like to do this, but too often papers are submitted without a name – this can take a great deal of time trying to figure out who deserves credit for all the hard work)

            2 points: Late papers are docked two full points per day – NO EXCEPTIONS.  If you think you may have problems submitting your paper on the FRIDAY of WEEK SEVEN, you should aim for submitting it in early. 

            5 points:  Did not write on approved topic (remember, you must submit your topic for approval and feedback by the end of Week Three.  If you want to change your topic, you must get approval)

            10 points: More than 20% of the paper is quotes and/or paraphrasing from your sources.  I want to hear your own voice.  Use your sources to support the connections you are trying to make in your paper.  Have confidence in your ability to explore the topic and make solid connections to the course material and relevant issues.  And always feel free to ask me for guidance while working on your paper!

            25 points: As noted, ALL papers are run through a software program used to detect plagiarism.  If your paper is plagiarized, you will receive a zero on the research paper.

 

Additional Information:

Submission of Late Work

With regard to the writing assignments, the syllabus specifies when they are due and I would like them to be submitted as Word or Word compatible documents (rtf is acceptable). Don’t wait until the last minute to submit the assignments. As the syllabus indicates, they are due at midnight Sunday of the week in which they are assigned. Yes, I will accept assignments if they are late, but your score on the assignment is determined and then reduced by 50%.

Academic honesty is the prerequisite for academic study. Academic dishonesty is inimical to the spirit of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from the university.

Plagiarism, the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work, sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. This does not make it less serious. However, students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their faculty member

This course requires a considerable amount of writing, as is appropriate for a 300 level, Liberal Learning course. Your writing must be your own and all sources must be cited. The use of commercially prepared term papers or copying and pasting papers from the Internet is, of course, unacceptable and I will check the authenticity of papers through the use of online plagiarism detective programs.

Professors are required to keep weekly attendance records and report absences throughout the term. Excused absences may be granted by the instructor for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands including temporary duty. However, the student is responsible for completing all missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, 2 weeks in a single term, will be reported to the university administration for appropriate action. Any student failing to attend class for two consecutive weeks, without an approved excuse, will be institutionally withdrawn (unofficially withdrawn) and notified by email that an "F" will be recorded.

Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time online and offline each week including but not limited to responding to the weekly discussions in the discussion threads, sending and receiving email, reading and reviewing online lectures, completing online quizzes and tests, and conducting research over the World Wide Web. A rule of thumb is that you should spend approximately 4-5 hours per week online reviewing course content and engaging in group work and discussion and an additional 4-6 hours per week on readings, preparing assignments, or completing papers or examinations.

A class week is defined as the time between Monday and Sunday. The first week begins the first day of class and ends at midnight the following Sunday. Writing assignments should be submitted so that I have them no later than Sunday midnight of the class week in which they are due.

Since this is an online course, it is preferred that you submit assignments via the Internet. You must make arrangements with me prior to submitting assignments in some other fashion. If you have problems submitting assignments, contact me immediately and we will attempt to resolve the problem.

Academic honesty is the prerequisite for academic study. Academic dishonesty is inimical to the spirit of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from the university.

Plagiarism, the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work, sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. This does not make it less serious. However, students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their faculty member

This course requires a considerable amount of writing, as is appropriate for a 300 level, Liberal Learning course. Your writing must be your own and all sources must be cited. The use of commercially prepared term papers or copying and pasting papers from the Internet is, of course, unacceptable and I will check the authenticity of papers through the use of online plagiarism detective programs.

 

Professors are required to keep weekly attendance records and report absences throughout the term. Excused absences may be granted by the instructor for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands including temporary duty. However, the student is responsible for completing all missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, 2 weeks in a single term, will be reported to the university administration for appropriate action. Any student failing to attend class for two consecutive weeks, without an approved excuse, will be institutionally withdrawn (unofficially withdrawn) and notified by email that an "F" will be recorded.

Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time online and offline each week including but not limited to responding to the weekly discussions in the discussion threads, sending and receiving email, reading and reviewing online lectures, completing online quizzes and tests, and conducting research over the World Wide Web. A rule of thumb is that you should spend approximately 4-5 hours per week online reviewing course content and engaging in group work and discussion and an additional 4-6 hours per week on readings, preparing assignments, or completing papers or examinations.

A class week is defined as the time between Monday and Sunday. The first week begins the first day of class and ends at midnight the following Sunday. Writing assignments should be submitted so that I have them no later than Sunday midnight of the class week in which they are due.

Since this is an online course, it is preferred that you submit assignments via the Internet. You must make arrangements with me prior to submitting assignments in some other fashion. If you have problems submitting assignments, contact me immediately and we will attempt to resolve the problem.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.

Park University Online Bookstore - Select "Distance Learning - Graduate," or "Distance Learning Internet," and then click on the appropriate course code (ex. AC 201, PA 501) to see the list of required and optional texts for each course that you are enrolled in. 

Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Your Campus Center Administrator can provide advising to you, please contact them for assistance.  If you need contact information for your Campus Center, click here.

Online Tutoring Services - Park University has arranged for Online students to receive five hours of free access to Online tutoring and academic support through Smarthinking. If you would like Online tutoring, please contact me to receive their recommendation and information on how to access the Online tutoring.

Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.

Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom or your proctor form, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275).

Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email the Park Helpdesk or call 800-927-3024.

Course Schedule:

Please use the Course Schedule provided below as a guide to the weekly focus and requirements for this course.

Academic Week of

Focus

Weekly Requirements

Week I

Personal Reaction Paper Option #1 Due Sunday

The Changing Family

Read and send signed syllabus – to do this, simply send me an email stating you agree to the syllabus.

Become familiar with the online communication tools - email and discussion board. Post a brief introduction to the class in the discussion board. Include your name, major and what you hope to learn from this class.

Read Intro to Textbook and the following articles:

1.    Goode, Theoretical Importance of the Family

2.    Giddens, The Global Revolution in Family and Personal Life

3.    Coontz, What We Really Miss about the 1950s

4.    Hays, The Mommy Wars

  • Read Class Lecture for Week I
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week I
  • Personal Reaction Assignment Option #1 due by end of academic week one

Week II

Changing Gender Roles 

Please Read the Following Articles:

1.    Jackson, Destined for Equality

2.    Gerson, Children of the Gender Revolution

3.    Coltrane & Adams, Men’s Family Work

  • Read Class Lecture for Week II
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week II

Week III

SUBMIT RESEARCH TOPIC by Sunday

Personal Reaction Paper Option #2 due Sunday

Views on Sexuality

Making Choices

Please read the following articles:

1.    Schalet, Raging Hormones…

2.    Bailey, Sexual Revolutions

3.    Edin, Few Good Men, Why Poor Mothers…

4.    Supreme Court, Case of Lawrence v. Texas

  • Read Class Lecture for Week III
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week III
  • Personal Reaction Assignment Option #2 due by end of academic week three
  • Submit topic for approval (for Course Research Paper):  Due by end of academic week

 

Week IV

Personal Reaction Paper Option #3 Due Sunday

Courtship & Marriage

Please read the following articles:

1.    Laner, Dating Scripts Revisited

2.    Skolnick, Grounds for Marriage

3.    Casper, Cohabitation

4.    Furstenberg, The Future of Marriage

5.    Drummet, Military Families Under Stress…  SUPPLEMENTAL READING for Extra Credit

  • Read Class Lecture for Week IV
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week IV
  • Personal Reaction Assignment Option #3 due by end of academic week

 

Week V

SUBMIT OUTLINE by Sunday

Parenthood & Childhood

Please read the following articles:

1.    Cowan, New Families

2.    Clawson, Caring for Our Young

3.    Townsend, Four Facets of Fatherhood

4.    Mintz, Beyond Sentimentality

  • Read Class Lecture for Week V
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week V
  • Outline due by end of academic week

 

Week VI

 Reaction Paper Option #4 Due SUNDAY

Work & Family

Please read the following articles:

1.    Rubin, Families on the Fault Line

2.    Newman, Family Values…

3.    Hochschild, Second Shift

4.    Jacobs, Overworked Individuals

  • Read Class Lecture for Week VI
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week VI
  • Personal Reaction Assignment Option #4 due by end of academic week

 

Week VII

RESEARCH PAPER DUE by FRIDAY

Divorce & Remarriage

Please read the following articles:

1.    Hackstaff, Divorce Culture…

2.    Mason, Modern American Stepfamily

3.    Amato, Consequences of Divorce…  SUPPLEMENTAL READING

  • Read Class Lecture for Week VII
  • Read Discussion Questions and Post Replies for Week VII
  • COURSE RESEARCH PAPER DUE MIDNIGHT, E.T. FRIDAY

Week VIII

EXAM WEEK

 

Diversity in the Family

You must SELECT TWO ARTICLES of your own choice from readings 32 through 35 and respond to the discussion question using those two articles to support your response

  • Read Class Lecture for Week VIII
  • Respond to discussion question
  • PROCTORED EXAM

 

Getting Started: I recommend you make note of my virtual office hours and contact information - keep my e-mail address and phone number handy in case you ever have problems logging in to the class. Second, read the syllabus and be sure you understand the course requirements, grading system and course goals. The syllabus will help your throughout the term, so I suggest you print a copy. You may then continue to the Course Content area to begin the class! Please e-mail me with any questions.