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ED 527 Growth and Development of Children and Adolescents
Cowley, Brian J.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

Course

ED 527 Growth and Development of Children and Adolescents

Semester

ULP 2006 ED

Faculty

Brian J. Cowley, Ph.D., BCBa

Title

Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology

Degrees/Certificates

B.S. - Psychology - Utah State University
M.S. - Behavior Analysis and Therapy - Southern Illinois University-C
Ph.D. - Human Development and Child Psychology - University of Kansas

Office Location

Mabee 224, Parkville Campus

Office Hours

Tuesday  and Thursday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Daytime Phone

816-584-6501

Other Phone

None

E-Mail

brian.cowley@park.edu

None

None

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/bcowley

Semester Dates

July 10, 2006 to August 4, 2006

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

5:00 - 9:50 PM

Prerequisites

None

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Berger, K. S. (2003).  The developing person: Through childhood and adolescence (6th edition).  New York: Worth.

Crain, W. (2000).  Theories of development: Concepts and applications (4th edition).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore


Course Description:
A developmental approach to the study of the growth and development of children and adolescents. This course explores the cognitive, personality, emotional, social and physical changes that occur in children from conception through adolescence. It will review research on how children learn, solve problems, and function in home and school environments.

Educational Philosophy:
Doctor Cowley's educational philosophy is based on using a variety of methods in learning with a focus on application.  Lectures, readings, essay examinations, group work, class discussion, writing, and the use of reference systems are significant components of this learning process.  Each student will be required to analyze, criticize, synthesize, and apply presented information.  Each student will be required to demonstrate these skills publicly in the classroom or through the written word.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Compare and contrast the major theories of child development (CEC #2; IRA #1; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2);
  2. Summarize developmental stages and processes in the three development domains, including physical development, cognitive development, and social-emotional development, in the developmental periods of infancy through late adolescence (CEC #2; IRA #1; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2);
  3. Describe and assess research strategies for investigating child development (CEC #2; IRA #3; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2 );
  4. Analyze the impact of context and culture on child development (CEC #2; IRA #1; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2; 1.3.6);
  5. Analyze the interrelatedness of theory, research, and practice in working with children and adolescents (CEC #2 & 9; IRA #3 & 4; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2 );
  6. Analyze the interaction of hereditary/constitutional and environmental factors on child development (CEC #2; IRA #1; MoSTEP 1.2.2; 1.3.2; 1.3.6);
  7. Identify and apply developmental research findings to educational practices (CEC #2 & 9; IRA #3 & 4; MoSTEP 1.2.2 & 1.2.9; 1.3.2); and
  8. Use effective communication skills to interact with others. (CEC # 6 & 10; IRA #3; MoSTEP 1.3.3).


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
• Essay Examinations.  There will be 3 Essay Examinations administered during the semester.  Each student will be given 4 essay test questions for one week.  At the end of the week, the test answers will be due.  Each student is allowed to use their textbook and other materials while completing the test.  Students may work together as long as their test answers are significantly different.  Each answer will need to be typed and double-spaced.  Each answer should include an introduction, an analysis, and a conclusion.  When the instructor collects the test, he will randomly select two of the four questions for grading.  These two questions will be used to evaluate the student's performance and will be worth up to 50 points each.  Each quiz will be worth up to 100 points with up to 300 points possible for all three tests.
Focus (arguable claim, original idea, & clear controlling idea) 20 Points
Development (full discussion, smooth style, & personal experiences) 10 Points
Organization (smooth transitions, clear paragraphing, & logical sequence of topics) 10 Points
Mechanics (proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling) 10 Points
• Article Discussion.  The class will be divided up into groups of 4-5 students.  Each group will find a research article about the topics covered in the assigned chapters in the Crain (2000) textbook and present what they found to the rest of the class.  Each group will summarize the article, explain how it applies to the classroom, and will indicate what good it does for society (Social Validity).  They will then turn in a paper (typed and double spaced) reflecting this information to the instructor.  There will be 8 article presentations per group and discussions for the semester.  These will be worth 30 points each with total of 240 being available.  The group will be graded on the quality of the presentation and summary.
Summary 10 Points
Application to the Classroom 10 Points
Social Validity 10 Points
• Classroom Application: The class will be divided up into groups of 4-5 students.  Each group will be assigned an age-group (elementary, middle school/junior high, and high school) to demonstrate how research and theory of human development is used to develop and implement school curriculum.  Each group will need to write a paper about their Classroom Application.  Each paper will need to be double spaced.  Each paper will need to be written in APA style.  Each paper will need to have 14 references including the textbook.  Seven of the 14 references will need to be empirically based research reports from a refereed professional journal.  Each group will need to synthesize, analyze, and evaluate their observations and the literature that they have cited.  This project will be worth up to 300 points.
Focus (arguable claim, original idea, & clear controlling idea) 25 Points
Development (full discussion, smooth style, & personal experiences) 25 Points
Organization (smooth transitions, clear paragraphing, & logical sequence of topics) 25 Points
Mechanics (proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling) 25 Points
Research and Theory Application 100 Points
14 References (7 Empirical Articles) 100 Points
Total 300 Points
• Group Demonstrations: Each group will give a classroom presentation about their Classroom Application to the rest of the class.  Each group will use 3 forms of media.  This can include PowerPoint, handouts, role-plays, etc.  No two forms of media can represent the same material.  When using a handout, be sure that each person in the class gets a copy and that it is a worthwhile document that does not immediately end up in the trash.  This project will be worth up to 100 points.
Presentation 25 Points
1st Form of Media 25 Points
2nd Form of Media 25 Points
3rd Form of Media 25 Points
Total 100 Points

Grading:
1st Essay Exam 100 Points
2nd Essay Exam 100 Points
3rd Essay Exam 100 Points
Article Discussions (8x30 Points)240 Points
Classroom Applications 300 Points
Group Demonstrations 100 Points
Total 940 Points

Grading percentages:
90 – 100% A
80 up to 89% B
70 up to 79% C
60 up to 69% D
0 up to 59% F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Any assignment turned in after the date it is due will be given up to half credit for that assignment.  No course materials will be accepted after the last class meeting.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
• Attend class and be prompt.  Roll will be checked during each class period.  It is your responsibility to make up anything missed in class and that your scheduled assignments are submitted on time.
• Be prepared for class.  This means that you have read the assigned readings and are prepared to discuss them.  This course will consist of class discussion, small group discussion, group work, lecture, and outside of class experiences.  You are expected to take part in the discussions and group work.  Also, assigned readings will not always be reviewed in class, but examinations will be from both assigned readings and class discussions.
• Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to a disk, a hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.
• The student is expected to have a copy of all written assignments on computer disk or in a hard copy form.  You will also be expected to retain all graded and returned assignments and examinations.
• The student is expected to have a copy of all written assignments on computer disk or in a hard copy form.  You will also be expected to retain all graded and returned assignments and examinations.

Date

Topic

Reading Assignment

Assignments

07-11-06

Functional Assessment

None

Article Discussion 1
Essay Examination 1 Distributed

07-13-06

•Introduction
•Theories of Development
•Heredity and Environment
•Early Theories
•Gesell's Maturational Theory

Chapters 1, 2, & 3(B)
Chapters 1 & 2 (C)

Article Discussion 2

07-18-06

•Prenatal Development
•The First 2 Years-Biosocial
•The First 2 Years-Cognitive
•Ethological Theories
•Montessori's Educational Philosophy

Chapters 4, 5, & 6 (B)
Chapters 3 & 4 (C)

Article Discussion 3
Essay Examination 1 Collected
Essay Examination 2 Distributed

07-20-06

•The First 2 Years-Psychosocial
•The Play Years-Biosocial
•Werner's Organismic and Comparative Theory
•Piaget's Cognitive-Developmental Theory
•Kohlberg's Stages of Moral Development

Chapters 7 & 8 (B)
Chapters 5, 6, & 7 (C)

Article Discussion 4

07-25-06

•The Play Years-Cognitive
•The Play Years-Psychosocial
•Learning Theory
•Bandura's Social Learning Theory
•Vygotsky's Social-Historical Theory of Cognitive Development

Chapters 9 & 10 (B)
Chapters 8, 9, & 10 (C)

Article Discussion 5
Essay Examination 2 Collected

07-27-06

•The School Years-Biosocial
•The School Years-Cognitive
•Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory
•Erikson and the Eight Stages of Life
•Mahler's Separation/Individuation Theory

Chapters 11 & 12 (B)
Chapters 11, 12, & 13 (C)

Article Discussion 6
Essay Examination 3 Distributed

08-01-06

•The School Years-Psychosocial
•Adolescence-Biosocial
•A Case Study in Psychoanalytic Treatment: Bettelheim on Autism
•Schachtel on Childhood Experiences
•Jung's Theory of Adulthood

Chapters 13 & 14 (B)
Chapters 14, 15, & 16 (C)

Article Discussion 7
Classroom Application Papers
Group Demonstration

08-03-06

•Adolescence-Cognitive
•Adolescence-Psychosocial
•Chomsky's Theory of Language Development
•Humanistic Psychology and Developmental Theory
•A Developmental Perspective on the Standards Movement

Chapters 15 & 16 (B)
Chapters 17, 18, & Epilogue (C)

Article Discussion 8
Essay Examination 3 Collected
Group Demonstration

 

 

 

 


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Graduate Catalog Page 20-22

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Graduate Catalog Page 20-22

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Graduate Catalog Page 23-24

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:6/28/2006 8:31:59 AM