Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus
Education Major Version

MA 120 Basic Concepts of Statistics
Beston, William C.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

MA 120 Basic Concepts of Statistics

Semester

S2T 2008 DLI

Faculty

Beston, William C.

Title

Mathematics/Adjunct Faculty

Office Location

Corpus Christi, TX

Office Hours

TBA

Daytime Phone

361-949-2561

E-Mail

william.beston@park.edu

wbeston@stx.rr.com

Web Page

http://home.stx.rr/com/wbeston

Semester Dates

Mar 17, 2008 - May 11, 2008

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

 

Required Text: Elementary Statistics, 10th Ed.
Author: Mario F. Triola
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
ISBN: 0-321-52291-5

Order text at: http://direct.mbsbooks.com/park.htm

An e-book is included with MyMathLab.  If you prefer to use it instead of the hardcopy, order the Student Access Kit only at www.mymathlab.com.  You will need your instructor's course ID code prior to ordering. 

You will also need a calculator. A TI-83+ or TI84+ is highly recommended. Links in the course Student Instruction Guide are provided for downloading required FREE software for the multimedia presentations of the course.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

 The purchase of a new textbook insures the inclusion of the Student Access Kit to MathZone.  The access kit can be purchased separately at http://www.mathzone.com/.  You will also need a calculator. (TI-83+ or TI-84+ or equivalent) Links in the course Student Instruction Guide are provided for downloading required FREE software for the multimedia presentations of the course.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
A development of certain basic concepts in probability and statistics that is pertinent to most disciplines. Topics include: probability models, parameters, statistics and sampling procedures, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

I believe that each and every person is capable of learning.  I believe that my task is to create an environment that allows the learning process to occur.  By enabling students to learn, I try to create an atmosphere where each student (to the best of my ability) knows that I care about their learning and that I will help them with processes and procedures that will allow them to develop problem solving skills and talents they  may never thought they could understand or achieve. My goal is create Master Students that are life-long learners.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Compute descriptive statistics for raw data as well as grouped data
  2. Determine appropriate features of a frequency distribution
  3. Apply Chebyshev's Theorem
  4. Distinguish between and provide relevant descriptions of a sample and a population
  5. Apply the rules of combinatorics
  6. Differentiate between classical and frequency approaches to probability
  7. Apply set-theoretic ideas to events
  8. Apply basic rules of probability
  9. Apply the concepts of specific discrete random variables and probability distributions
  10. Compute probabilities of a normal distribution


Core Assessment:

Description of MA 120 Core Assessment


 


One problem with multiple parts for each numbered item, except for item #3, which contains four separate problems.


 


1.         Compute the mean, median, mode, and standard deviation for a sample of 8 to 12 data.


 


2.         Compute the mean and standard deviation of a grouped frequency distribution with 4 classes.


 


3.         Compute the probability of four problems from among these kinds or combinations there of:


            a.         the probability of an event based upon a two-dimensional table;


            b.         the probability of an event that involves using the addition rule;


            c.         the probability of an event that involves conditional probability;


            d.         the probability of an event that involves the use of independence of events;


            e.         the probability of an event based upon permutations and/or combinations;


            f.          the probability of an event using the multiplication rule; or


            g.         the probability of an event found by finding the probability of the complementary event.


 


4.         Compute probabilities associated with a binomial random variable associated with a practical situation. 
  
5.         Compute probabilities associated with either a standard normal probability distribution or with a non-standard normal probability distribution.

6.         Compute and interpret a confidence interval for a mean and/ or for a proportion.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Student assessment will be based on Homework, Quizzes, Participation, and a proctored Final Exam.
 
The Final Exam is part of the core assessment. The Final Exam is a departmental exam and it will be provided to the instructor by the Department of Mathematics at Park University. The final is 2 hrs in length; books, notes, and a calculator are allowed.

Grading:

 Overall assessment of student final grades will be based on: (Relative weights and due dates are included)

Assignment

% of Grade

Due Date

HW1

5%

Week 1

HW2

5%

Week 2

HW3

5%

Week 3

HW4

5%

Week 4

HW5

5%

Week 5

HW6

5%

Week 6

HW7

4%

Week 7

HW8

2%

Week 8

Quiz #1

4%

Week 1

Quiz #2

4%

Week 2

Quiz #3

4%

Week 3

Quiz #4

4%

Week 4

Quiz #5

4%

Week 5

Quiz #6

4%

Week 6

Quiz #7

4%

Week 7

Class Participation

16%

Continually

Proctored Final Examination

20%

Week 8

  • A student that has achieved the following numerical average is assured the following minimum letter grade:

Numerical

Letter Grade

90 –100

A

80-89

B

70-79

C

60-69

D

0-59

F

  • You will be evaluated on the total number of points you earned as compared to the greatest number of points that may be earned in each course activity. In determining the number of points assigned to an activity, the major factors will be the following questions:
    Was the work completed?
    Was the work completed correctly?
    Was the work completed on time?
  •  
    • Submission of Graded Work: Before the end of the each week, you need to have submitted online answers to the HW and Quiz. Work copies of the HW and Quiz are available in the Doc Sharing area.
    • Participation Credit: You should have interacted in the Class Discussion area as least twice. Asking questions about specific questions in the Class Discussion area is allowed and encouraged. For instance, you may start your discussion in the following way:

    Q1-P16: I do not know how to calculate the class width for this question. I thought it was 20.9 but that is not an answer. Can somebody help? By starting your question with the problem information first, other students will be able to quickly identify which problem the discussion is about and be able to help or see the suggestions.

    Once you have submitted your answers to the HW and Quiz, I will notify you in the Comments Area of the Gradebook which questions you have answered incorrectly and allow you to resubmit answers for the entire HW and/or Quiz a second time. If you do not submit your second set of answers within one week, the grade you originally have recorded will be locked for that particular assignment.

    Class Participation: In order to receive full credit for Class Participation, you must submit your Homework and Quiz during the week it is due and participate in the Class Discussion area at least twice each week. 
  •  Proctored final examination/Project - If the course requires a proctored final, the information below should be included. If the course is a graduate course and doesn't require a proctored final, the developer should include a detailed description of the projects activities, requirements, and due dates.          

    • A final proctored examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.
    • Other Information on proctored exams:
      • It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
      • Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.
      • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.

 Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Submission of Late Work: Submission of course materials are required each week. Late submission of material will not be accepted unless prior permission has been requested and been approved by the instructor. Under extraordinary circumstances, alternate arrangements may be made and approved by the instructor. (Extraordinary circumstances include personal tragedy, family bereavement, emergency hospitalization, etc.)

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

I believe that each and every person is capable of learning. I believe that my job is to create an environment that allows the learning process to occur. I don't "teach". I enable others to learn. I try to create an atmosphere where each student (to the best of my ability) knows that I care about their learning and that I will help them with processes and procedures that will allow them to develop problem solving skills and talents they never thought they could understand or achieve.

For Online courses, the most important thing you need to do is to get started. The work may look overwhelming, but if you don't start, you can never finish. Students learn differently. Each student is unique. Each student has his/her own preferred learning style. Can I create an environment where I am not the master of the subject matter, but an environment where I am a mentor helping each person to progress in their ability to learn? I hope that students understand the importance of a positive learning environment and perform to the best of their abilities at that time. I am looking forward to learning from you hopefully as much as you learn from me.
I expect you to complete assignments in a scholarly manner. This means that I expect appropriate standards of proper English usage in the course discussions.
I expect very active participation from you. I and the others in the class need to hear from you. Responding to your peers is important. Hopefully your thoughts will stimulate further ideas and discussion. I will be participating in these discussions.
I expect courteous discussions. We will be discussing some topics in which you may not agree with the responses of others. Let us agree to disagree but do so in a respectful and polite way.
I expect responses which demonstrate that you have pondered the problems in a thoughtful manner.
I expect that you will be a highly motivated student .
I expect that if you are having any problems or difficulties with this course, that you will reach out to me and let me help you.
You cannot get much from the course without doing the assignments- it is, after all, a problem solving course! I expect you to do all of the assigned problems, besides studying example problems and alternate questions. Your commitment for this course should be about 6 hours per week! May I suggest that you make a schedule for yourself to make sure that you are setting aside enough time to do this course properly.
I expect you to ask questions on problem assignments. If you do not, they will require much more time than you can possibly spend. You'll learn more from each other, and more quickly, than you could possibly learn on your own.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Welcome to Basic Concepts of Statistics. This course provides an introduction to the world of statistical analysis. Each week you will focus on different aspects of the general topic.

In Unit 1 you will learn what the topic of statistics entails. You will discuss some ways to collect the needed data for a statistical study. By the end the unit you will have a view of how the two distinct divisions of statistics, descriptive and inferential, are related.

In Unit 2 You will discover how to convert pure data into corrupted data, also referred to as ungrouped data into grouped data. Then you will examine some of the many ways data can be visually displayed. You will finish with a consideration of a method matching and graphing two sets of data to analyze the possibility of a relationship. You will return to this analysis graph again in Unit 8 when you review correlation and regression.

In Unit 3 you will examine ways to describe data by looking at its central tendency, its variation from its center, and how to determine the location of an element within a data set. A method of finding the proportions of variation a data set possesses will also be covered.

In Unit 4 you will explore the basic concepts of probabilities, the branch of mathematics that allows us to take a sample and make predictions about the population from which it was derived. You will strive to gain a fundamental understanding of probability through its addition, multiplication and counting rules.

In Unit 5 you will combine the probability concepts and the statistical concepts you previously learned to construct discrete probability distributions. Then you will learn how to find statistics of the distribution. The unit ends with a discussion on a specific discrete probability distribution called the binomial distribution.

In Unit 6 the discussion changes from discrete distributions to continuous random variable distributions. You will begin looking at the Normal distribution and then quickly move on to the Standard Normal distribution. You will conclude the unit by learning how the Central Limit Theorem can be applied to sample data sets.

In Unit 7 You will learn about inferential statistics. You will learn how to use a sample mean to estimate the population mean, and how you can confidently report its value within a specific interval.

In Unit 8 you will examine the basics of hypothesis testing by using one-sample procedures for the hypothesis test of the population mean. In addition you will conclude the examination of topics in statistics by discussing the purpose of regression and correlation analysis. First, you will examine some introductory terms, then focus on simple linear regression analysis and simple linear correlation analysis. During the final week of the course you will also complete the proctored Final Exam and the Course Evaluation.
  

MAT 120 - Basic Concepts of Statistics

3/17/2008 to 5/11/2008

Topics

Homework and Quiz Schedule Due Dates

Week

 

Date

 

Monday

 

HW

Quiz

1

3/17/2008

Chapter 1 Introduction to Statistics 1.1-1.4

 

Basic Statistical Definitions, Types of Data, and Design of Experiments

 

HW1

Quiz 1

2

3/24/2008

Chapter 2 Summarizing and Graphing Data 2.1 - 2.4

 

Frequency Distributions, Histograms, and Statistical Graphics

 

HW2

Quiz 2

3

3/31/2008

Chapter 3 Data Description 3.1-3.5

 

Measures of Center, Variation, and Relative Standing, Data Analysis

 

HW3

Quiz 3

4

4/7/2008

Chapter 4 Probability 4.1-4.7

 

Fundamentals, Addition, Multiplication, and Conditional Rules, Rules of Probability, Counting Rules

 

HW4

Quiz 4

5

4/14/2008

Chapter 5 Probability Distributions 5.1-5.5

 

Random Variables, the Binomial Distribution, and the Poisson Distribution

 

HW5

Quiz 5

6

4/21/2008

Chapter 6 The Normal Distribution 6.1-6.7

 

The Normal Distribution, Central Limit Theorem, Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution

 

HW6

Quiz 6

7

4/28/2008

Chapter 7 Estimates and Sample Size 7.1-7.5

 

Confidence Intervals for the Population Mean when sigma is Known and Unknown, Confidence Intervals and Sample Size for Proportions, Confidence Intervals for Variances and Standard Deviations

 

HW7

Quiz 7

8

5/5/2008

Chapter 8 Hypothesis Testing 8.1-8.4, Chapter 10 Correlation and Regression 10.1-10.3

 

Hypothesis Testing, Claims about Proportions , Scatter Plots, Correlation, Regression

 

HW8

End Date

5/11/2008

 

 

Final Exam (Chapters 1-7)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86
***********************************************************
Academic dishonesty includes committing or the attempt to commit cheating, plagiarism, falsifying academic records, and other acts intentionally designed to provide unfair advantage to the students.

Cheating includes, but is not limited to, intentionally giving or receiving unauthorized aid or notes on examinations, papers, laboratory reports, exercises, projects, or class assignments which are intended to be individually completed.  Cheating also includes the unauthorized copying of tests or any other deceit or fraud related to the student's academic conduct.

Falsifying academic records includes, but is not limited to, altering grades or other academic records.

Other acts that constitute academic dishonesty include:

Stealing, manipulating, or interfering with an academic work of another student or faculty member.

Collusion with other students on work to be completed by one student.

Lying to or deceiving a faculty member.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .
Instructors, You should either delete this message and leave blank, or enter additional comments or policies.



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with 100% accuracy. Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with at least 80% accuracy. Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to perform a test of hypothesis. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with 100% accuracy. Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with at least 80% accuracy. Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with less than 80%  accuracy. Makes no attempt to compute or interpret a confidence interval. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with 100% accuracy. Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with at least 80% accuracy. Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to apply the normal distribution, Central Limit Theorem, or binomial distribution. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
4,5,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with 100% accuracy. Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with at least 80% accuracy. Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to explain any of the terms listed. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with 100% accuracy. Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with at least 80% accuracy. Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with less than 80%  accuracy. Makes no attempt to define any concept. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3,8,9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All must be done with 100% accuracy. Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All must be done with at least 80% accuracy. Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All are done with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to compute any of the probabilities or statistics listed. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
7,8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with 100 % accuracy. Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with at least 80 % accuracy. Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to apply the concepts to real-world problems. 
Components                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with 100% accuracy. Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with at least 80% accuracy. Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with less 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to use any computing device to compute statistics. 

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:3/3/2008 9:01:30 AM