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EDC 358 Early Childhood Program Management
Fink, Betty S.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EDC 358 Early Childhood Program Management

Semester

SP 2006 HO

Faculty

Fink, Betty S.

Title

Assistant Professor of Education

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Arts in ElementaryEducation
Certified in Early Childhood
Certified in Administration

Office Location

Independence Campus

Office Hours

one hour before class in classroom and 2:30-4:00 on R in Indep. Office

Daytime Phone

816-584-6563

E-Mail

bfink@mail.park.edu

Semester Dates

January 9-May 6

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

6:30 - 8:00 PM

Perquisites

Admission fo the School for Education

Credit Hours

2


Textbook:
Decker, Celia A. and Decker, John R.  (2005) Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs.  Eighth Edition. New Jersey:  Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall

National Association Education of Young Children Accreditation Performance Criteria
www.naeyc.org/accreditation/performance_criteria/complete.asp

Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment
www.naeyc.org/about/positions/PSETHO5.asp

Where We Stand on Child Abuse Prevention
www.naeyc.org.about/positions

Licensing rules for Group Day Care Homes and Child Care Centers
http://www.dhss.mo.gov/ChildCare/LawsRegs.htm

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore


Course Description:
A course examining the issues of management in early childhood programs,  including supervision; planning environments, curriculum, and evaluation  procedures; health, safety, nutrition; guidance and classroom management;  professional decision-making; working with families and community; and  advocacy. Students will visit and participate in a variety of different  programs serving children from birth through grade 3.  Prerequisite:   Admission to the School for Education. 2:0:2

Educational Philosophy:
FACULTY'S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: Adult learners bring a wide range of professional and personal experiences and knowledge to the university classroom.  Each student has a unique learning style, needs, and interests.  It is the instructor's role to create a community of learners who take ownership of their learning by help the student make connections with current practice and new knowledge, and reflect on their own assumptions, beliefs, and practice.

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. • Analyze federal, state and local legislation, regulations and professional standards impacting early childhood programs. (MOSTEP 1.2.9, EC 7.1, NAEYC 5.a, Director's Credential V and VII)
  2. • Compare various types of early childhood programs, their organizational and operating structure, the multiply roles the early childhood staff must assume and the professional challenges faced. ( MOSTEP 1.2.10, EC 7.2, NAEYC 5a, Director's Credential VII)
  3. • Collect information on central policy issues in the early childhood field such as societal concerns about quality, curriculum standards and assessment, financing and professional compensation and develops a personal advocacy plan to address issues.  (MOSTEP 1.2.9, EC 7.1. 7.6, NAEYC 5e, 5d, Director's Credential VIII)
  4. • Analyze various strategies for communicating and working effectively with colleagues, support staff, volunteers, other professionals, and families within the learning community.  MOSTEP 1.2.10, EC 3.3, EC 7.5, NAEYC 5c, Director's Credential VIII
  5. • Analyze ethical issues using the NAEYC Code of Ethics and develop plans for resolving issues.  (MOSTEP 1.2.9.3, EC 7.4, NAEYC 5b, Director's Credential VIII)
  6. • Assemble information on various professional organizations, educational opportunities, and professional resources in early childhood education and assess how these support ongoing professional development (MOSTEP 1.92, EC 7.3, NAEYC 5a,5c, 5d, Director's Credential VIII)
Class Assessment:


COURSE ASSESSMENTS:
This course requires strong reading and writing skills, highly organized study practices, and basic word processing skills. If you find that you need academic support to be successful in this course, please contact the instructor and Debra McArthur in Academic Support immediately. All work must be typewritten with careful attention to spelling and grammar.


Core assessment: (Objectives 1,2, 3, 4, and 5)

Analysis of an early childhood setting (35 pts)

Student will complete an in depth analysis of an early childhood setting using criteria of the NAEYC Accreditation Standards as a guide.    Information to complete the analysis will be gathered by visiting the center, interviewing a panel of directors, supervisors and principals, and interviewing classroom staff.  Staff and family handbooks will also be reviewed.  Components of program management to be considered include:  
• Organizational structure
• Function and membership of boards
• Identified program goals and objective of program and system in place to monitor progress toward achieving the stated goals and objectives
• Center funding sources
• How does program/center conduct an annual comprehensive program evaluation?
• How does management  seek input from staff and families
• Curriculum and assessment
• Administrative support of curriculum and assessment
• Professional development opportunities
• Administrative support of professional development
• Family involvement and communications
• Support available to families
• Communication strategies with, staff, support staff, other professionals
• Risk management plans
• Maintenance and safety issues
• Nutrition and health issues
• Challenges faced by the director/principal
• Challenges faced by program/center
• Challenges faced by classroom staff
• Ethical issues faced by classroom staff
• Ethical issues faced by directors/principals

Paper will conclude with recommendations to each center based on the analysis with a justification for each recommendation. Justifications must be supported by citing professional readings.

Additional assessments:

1. For each chapter of the textbook the student will select one of the questions at the end of the chapter and write a one to two page reflection.  These are due on the date for discussing the chapter in class. No late reflections will be accepted. 10 pts.

2.  Typewritten notes will be due the week following each site visit and /or following an interview. 10 pts,

3.  Investigation of professional organizations. (Objective 6)
The student will research two professional organizations to 1)determine mission and goals of the organization, 2) types of memberships and cost and services and benefits of membership. The paper should 3) conclude with a personal reflection that addresses why membership in a professional organization is important in supporting your growth as a professional and which organization you will join and why you selected that organization.  25 pts.
Organizations to research:  
• National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) required
• Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)
• National Association of Family Care Providers (NAFCC)
• Zero to three: National Center for Infants Toddlers and Families
• Southern Early Childhood Association
• National Black Child Development Institute

Grading:
GRADING PLAN:  The course requirements are all assigned point values.  Rubrics will be provided for each of the assignments.  You will earn grades on the basis of total point earned in the course.  All assignments must be turned in on time.  Late assignments will not be given full credit.  Rubrics must be completed and attached to each assignment.

A= 90 percent of points
B= 80 percent of points
C= 70 percent of points

Late Submission of Course Materials:
LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:  Assignments must be submitted on time to receive full credit. Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive however technology can also cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  You are responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk and print out paper copies for backup purposes.  When turning in an assignment, be sure to provide the instructor with a paper copy rather than a disk or an e-mail attachment.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
CLASS POLICIES:
• Arrive promptly for class.
• Attend all class meetings (excused absences for emergencies only).
• Actively participate in class learning experiences.
• Complete all reading assignments before the class for which they are assigned.
• Complete all assignments on the date indicated in the syllabus.  

Each student will be an important part of the community of learners.  Class participation and weekly questions constitute a major portion of the course.  More importantly, the learnings created through discussion and group work will be essential to developing understandings of the course content.  If you should have an emergency and are unable to attend, please be sure to call the instructor before the class meeting.  Attendance will be considered in determining the final course grade. If you have more than five absences for the semester, your final evaluation will be lowered by one grade, for example, a “B” will become a “C.”  Three late arrivals or early departures = one missed class.


Cell Phones:  The use of cell phones has become increasingly disruptive.  Please make sure family and friends understand that you are in class and they are not to call on your cell phones unless it is an emergency.  Please place cell phone on a silent ring and leave the classroom if you must use your phone

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS:  Subject to change.  In order to be well prepared for interviews and site visits and to participate fully in class discussion, read Decker and Decker chapters 1-7 within the first three weeks of class.  
Week Date Topics/Assignments
1 January 10

Orientation to class.  
Historical Perspective  
Reading: Chapter l Overview of Early Childhood Programs
Reflection on chapter due.


2 January 17 Constructing the Early Childhood Program's Framework
Reading Chapter 2:  Planning, Implementing and Evaluating the Program
Reflection on chapter due.
3 January 24



Continue Constructing the Early Childhood Program's Framework
Reading Chapter 3:  Considering Regulations and Establishing Policies
Reflection on chapter due.

Visitor from QRS and Accreditation
4 January 31 Continue Constructing the Early Childhood Program's Framework
Readings: NAEYC Accreditation Performance Criteria and Licensing rules for Group day Care Homes and Child Day Care Centers
Planning for site visit and interview


5 February 7 Operationalizing the Early Childhood Program
Reading:  Chapter 4 Leading and Managing Personnel
Reflection on chapter due.

Visit to an early childhood site and interview with director
6 February 14 Continue Operationalizing the Early Childhood Program
Reading: Chapter 5 Planning the Physical Facility
Reflection on chapter due.
Notes on site visit and interview 1 due

7 February 21 Continue Operationalizing the Early Childhood Program
Reading:  Chapter 6 Financing and budgeting
Reflection on chapter due.

Visit to second early childhood site and interview with director

8 February 28 Visit to third early childhood site and interview with director

Notes from visit and interview 2 due
Deadline for notifying instructor of site will focus on and and dates schedule for interviewing teacher

SPRING BREAK March 5-12

9 March 14





Continue Operationalizing the Early Childhood Program
Reading:  NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment

Notes from visit and interview 3rd due

10 March 21
Implementing the Children's Program
Reading:  Chapter 7 Planning the Children's Program
Reflection on Chapter due


11 March 28




Continue Implementing the Children's Program
Reading:  Chapter8 Providing , Health and Safety Services
Reading:Where We stand on Child Abuse Prevention
Reflection on Chapter due

12 April 4 Typewritten draft of core assessment due for peer editing.

13 April 11

Continue Implementing the Children's Program
Reading:  Chapter 9  Assessing, Recording and Reporting Children' Progress
Notes on interview and visit due.
Panel of early childhood teachers.

14 April 18 Continue Implementing the Children's Program
Reading: Chapter 10 Working within the Family and Community Contexts
Reflection on Chapter due
Guest speaker Family advocate
DRAFT OF CORE ASSESSMENT DUE

15 April 25

Continue Implementing the Children's Program
Reading; Chapter 11 Contributing to the Profession
Review of Professional Organizations due




16 May 2 Professionalism
CORE ASSESSMENT DUE


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89
Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

7. If you have more than five absences for the semester, your final evaluation will be lowered by one grade, for example, a “B” will become a “C.”  Three late arrivals or early departures = one missed class.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Copyright:

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