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CA 218 Public Relations
Ventresca, Thomas J.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 218 Public Relations

Semester

F1J 2008 PV

Faculty

Ventresca, Thomas J.

Title

Senior Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

M.A. Counseling, University of Missouri-Kansas City
M.A. English, Pittsburg State University
B.A. English, Rockhurst University

Daytime Phone

816-931-3428

E-Mail

tventresca@mail.park.edu

tventresca@kc.rr.com

Semester Dates

August 18-October 12, 2007

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:30 - 9:50 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Effective Public Relations, Ninth Edition, Scott Cutlip, Allen Center, Glen Broom.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
A study of the dissemination of public information through mass media; intraorganizational information; public opinion analysis, research techniques to establish psychographics within groups, applications in business, government, education, and politics. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

The facilitator's educational philosophy is one of critical thinking and exploration based on readings, lectures, dialogues, writings, presentations, and students' insights.  The facilitiator will engage each  learner in a lively discussion of issues and challenges, and how these ideas and insights can improve professional careers and personal lives.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. COURSE OBJECTIVES: When the course is complete:
  2. Students will have a critical understanding of the centrality of communication skills to their successful performance as a public relations practitioner.
  3. Students will critically evaluate studies pertaining to research in public relations
  4. Students will develop a practical methodology for identifying problems, implementing solutions and evaluating programs.
  5. Students will develop an understanding of the historical roots of the field and ethical conduct.
  6. Students will identify the role of the public relations practitioner in the context of organizations and society.


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.  The core assessment for this course is the Public Relations Group Project.  Students will develop a pubic relations program for an organization, place, idea, product, event, or individual.  The project will consist of a paper and an oral presentation by the group.  The choice of the specific program will be left to the discretion of the group members with instructor approval.  The program should be a realistic and comprehensive as possible.  A detailed instruction sheet will be distributed in class.  (100 points) While this activity is required, its weight related to the grade computation may be modified as long as it is at least 20%of the total grade for the course. (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Students will be evaluated by the above Public Relations Group Project, plus seven reflection papers on the readings, two chapter presentations, book review, and attendance.

All papers should be typewritten, double-spaced.  Name, title, number of the assignment, and date in the upper right hand corner.  Students may rewrite their graded papers.  Hand in rewritten papers by the next class (include the original stapled underneath the rewrite).  The scores of the two papers (the original and the rewrite) will be averaged to get a new score.  The content, organization (opening, body, close), and mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling) of the papers are very important.

Grading:

Public Relations Group Project (15 points)
Seven Reflection Papers (5 points each = 35 points)
One or two chapter presentations (8 points)
Book Review (5 points)
Guest Speaker (2 points)
Perfect Attendance (4 points)
One Absence (0 points)
Two Absences (-6 points)
Three Absences (-12 points plus a failing grade for the class)
 
A = 58-69
B = 46-57
C = 35-45
D = 24-34
F = 0-23
 
 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Late papers may not be accepted; if accepted they will be subject to a reduced grade.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Students are expected to honor the basic rules of classroom behavior: (1) only one person speaks at a time, (2) no side conversations while someone is talking, (3) full attention given to person speaking, (4) treat others as you would like to be treated (respect shown to everyone in the class) (5) no use of electronic devices other than taking notes for class.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Class #1 (August 19) 
Overview of the course.  Syllabus.  Introductions.  Read Chapters One and Two in textbook.  One reflection paper (one to two pages in length) with something of interest in Chapter One and something of interest in Chapter Two. 
 
Class #2 (August 26)
Introduction to Contemporary Public Relations, Practitioners of Public Relations, Organizational Settings, Historical Origins.  Read Chapters Three and Four.  One reflection paper on something of interest and relevance in each of Chapter Three and  Chapter Four.  Presentations on Chapters 1-4.  Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #3 (September 2)
Defining Public Relations Problems, Planning and Programming.  Read Chapters Eleven and Twelve.  One reflection paper on Chapters 11 and 12.  Presentations on Chapters 11 and 12.   Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #4 (September 9)
Taking Action and Communicating, Evaluating the Program.  Read Chapters 13, 14.  Reflection paper on someting of interest and relevance in each chapter (13,14).  Presentations on Chapters 13,14.  Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #5 (September 16)
Ethics and Professionalism, Legal Considerations.  Read Chapters 5,6.  Reflection paper on Chapters 5,6.  Presentations on Chapters 5,6.  Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #6 (September 23)
Theoretical Underpinnings, Communication and Public Opinion.  Read Chapters 7,8.  Reflection paper on Chapters 7,8. Presentations on Chapters 7,8.  Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #7 (September 30)
Internal Relations and Employee Communication, External Media and Media Relations.  Read Chapters 9, 10.  Reflection paper on Chapters 9,10.  Presentations on Chapters 9,10.  Discussion of chapters, presentations, and papers.
 
Class #8 (October 7)
Public Relations Group Project Presentations.  Group and individual papers due.   

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 3, 4 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Constructs a specific, measurable problem statement that indicates mastery of the essential elements of what, where, who, when, why, and how. Also provides a situation analysis that supports, expands and illustrates the problem statement.

 
Constructs a specific, measurable problem statement that includes the essential elements of what, where, who, when, why, and how. Also provides a situation analysis that supports, expands and illustrates the problem statement.

 
Constructs a problem statement that is vague and not measurable and does not include all of the essential elements of what, where, who, when, why, and how. The situation analysis does not support, expand and illustrate the problem statement.

 
Problem statement is very vague and does not include any of the essential elements of what, where, who, when, why, and how. Does not include a situation analysis that supports, expands and illustrates the problem statement.

 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Design of short and long term plans illustrate mastery of the four principles of goal setting as outlined by George Morrisey: 1) Get Agreement and Commitment, 2) Reduce Goals to a Manageable (bite) Size, 3) State Goals in Terms of Measurable Results with Target Dates and Cost Limitations, 4) Initiate an Action Plan.

 
Design short and long term plans that meet the four principles of goal setting as outlined by George Morrisey: 1) Get Agreement and Commitment, 2) Reduce Goals to a Manageable (bite) Size, 3) State Goals in Terms of Measurable Results with Target Dates and Cost Limitations, 4) Initiate an Action Plan.

 
Short and long term plans do not meet the four principles of goal setting as outlined by George Morrisey: 1) Get Agreement and Commitment, 2) Reduce Goals to a Manageable (bite) Size, 3) State Goals in Terms of Measurable Results with Target Dates and Cost Limitations, 4) Initiate an Action Plan.

 
Short and long term plans do not meet any of the four principles of goal setting as outlined by George Morrisey: 1) Get Agreement and Commitment, 2) Reduce Goals to a Manageable (bite) Size, 3) State Goals in Terms of Measurable Results with Target Dates and Cost Limitations, 4) Initiate an Action Plan.

 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Survey shows mastery of systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions related to purpose of study.



 
Survey shows use of acceptable and systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions. Survey shows use of some acceptable and systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions. Survey does not show use of acceptable and systematic research methods and draws inappropriate conclusions. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Extensive use of professional-level vocabulary.








 
Acceptable use of professional- level vocabulary. Rudimentary, inappropriate use of professional-level vocabulary. Poor and inappropriate use of professional-level vocabulary. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Professional mastery in all 4 components: Problem Statement and Situation Analysis, Planning and Programming, Taking Action and Communicating, and Program Evaluation.






 
Meets acceptable standards in all 4 components: Problem Statement and Situation Analysis, Planning and Programming, Taking Action and Communicating, and Program Evaluation. Meets some of the acceptable standards in 4 components: Problem Statement and Situation Analysis, Planning and Programming, Taking Action and Communicating, and Program Evaluation. Does not meet acceptable standards in all 4 components: Problem Statement and Situation Analysis, Planning and Programming, Taking Action and Communicating, and Program Evaluation. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
A professional quality action plan, communication plan, and program implementation plan are included for each public, and an in-depth written evaluation of the group process that addresses all 7 questions on the Group Project assignment.





 
An action plan, communication plan, and program implementation plan are included for each public, and a written evaluation of the group process that addresses all 7 questions on the Group Project assignment.


 
A rudimentary action plan, communication plan, and program implementation plan are included for each public, and a written evaluation of the group process that addresses 5 or 6 questions on the Group Project assignment.

 
Action plan, communication plan, and program implementation plan are missing for each public, and a written evaluation of the group process that addresses 4 or less questions on the Group Project assignment.

 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Project focus is clear, thoughtful and imaginative, sources are smoothly integrated and persuasively support the project focus, sequence of topics is smooth with a convincing rhetorical pattern, and there are no grammatical errors.  




 
Project focus is clear and sustained, sources clearly support the purpose, sequence of topics is logical, and occasional sentence structure or diction problems do not seriously distract the reader. Project focus is clear but commonplace, sources are not always relevant and critically discussed, sequence of topics is generally easy to follow but may occasionally wander, and there are enough mechanical problems to temporarily distract the reader. Project lacks focus, makes no use of sources, sequence of topics is difficult to follow, and has severe problems with sentence structure or word choice. 

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Last Updated:7/13/2008 11:04:38 PM