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ED 532 Teaching and Learning: Theoryinto Practice
Choi, Dong Hwa


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 532 Teaching and Learning: Theoryinto Practice

Semester

F2P 2008 ED

Faculty

Choi, Dong Hwa

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph. D

Office Location

Downtown

Office Hours

T : Noon-5 pm (Downtown Rm. 819) & W: 4-5 pm  (Parkville, Copley Rm. 320)

Daytime Phone

(o) 816-559-5604

E-Mail

dong.choi@park.edu

Semester Dates

Oct 20-Dec 14, 08

Class Days

---W---

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Enhancing Professional Practice:  A Framework for Teaching, Charlotte Danielson, ASCD

Additional Resources:
 

Ø       McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.

Ø       Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.

Ø       Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024

Ø       Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
ED 532 Teaching and Learning: Theory into Practice: Current theories and research on the topics of learning, motivation, teacher thinking, and effective teachings are reviewed and updated. Classroom applications will be stressed; students must complete an application project in which they apply current theory in teaching and learning to an actual classroom problem.

Educational Philosophy:
 

Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism. 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Read and discuss literature and research on teaching and learning during class in a critically reflective manner.
  2. Understand the basic assumptions pertaining to the most influential theoretical perspectives in education and recognize the implications for current theory and practice by incorporating into application project.
  3. Apply theory and research in educational psychology to actual classroom practice in teacher research project.
  4. Appreciate the role that historical antecedents have in our understanding of both theory and practice in education as evidenced by participation grade.
  5. Construct and reflect upon personal connections, in class discussion, between theory and practice as they relate to motivating those with diverse learning styles.
  6. Model problem-solving for their present and future students as evidenced by teacher research project.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

 I.  Weekly Reflection Papers (Due: 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3) (Total: 78 pts)

Read the reading assignments that are given by the instructor (not the textbook chapters) for each week. Complete the weekly reflection paper(s). When you have two reading assignments per week, read both reading assignments and complete two weekly reflection papers. Use the discussion items that are provided by the instructor as a guild when you read the reading assignments. These discussion items will provide you with issues you should concentrate on. These are personal reflection journals. In order words, they are what you think and believe related to what you are learning.   


II. Project (Core Assignment) (Total: 132 pts)

A. Program Investigation #1 (45 pts) & Class PP presentation (21 pts) (Due: 11/12)  

1. Select one area in the four dimensions of theComponents of Professional Practice” for the project: 1) Planning and Preparation, 2) Classroom Environment, 3) Instruction, and 4) Professional Responsibilities.  For the most beneficial learning experience for you, consider what dimension can contribute to your learning or the job that you are performing or will be performing.

 2. You will study your practices in terms of the dimension that you have selected. For example, suppose you select the Classroom Environment for your practice investigation. The following items can be studied.

a) How do I create an environment of respect and rapport with students?

b) How do I establish a culture for learning?

c) How do I manage classroom procedures?

d) How do I manage students’ behaviors?

e) How do I organize physical space?

f) What are the students’ demographics of my class?

You can select one or two questions and investigate in depth, instead of covering all the questions. Also, reflect how all components in the Classroom Environment are interrelated to each other and create different types of dynamics for students.

3. After you study your practices, prepare 1) Program Investigation #1 Report and 2) PowerPoint presentation for the class.

1) Write a report paper. In your report, include the components as follows. Site the resources or references (3-4) you use in your paper. Paper should be 5-6 pages in length and double space, 12 font size letter. (45 pts)

Ø       School name and location

Ø       Your topic

Ø       Your analysis of your practices regarding the topics. For this analysis, you can use your observation data. Describe what you have observed about your teaching and evaluate or reflect on those observations using your educational beliefs, philosophies, and opinions.

Ø       Your remediation suggestions to yourself: Discuss what you as a teacher, would like to suggest as alternative ideas or an innovative new approach to improve the current situations. The remediation suggestions should be supported as feasible and new alternative ideas.

Ø       Your overall reflections regarding the topic.  

Ø       Use references.

2) Prepare a PowerPoint presentation for the class.  (21 pts)

You can present the components in your paper to the class through the PP presentation. Make your presentation clear to your classmates in order to explain what you have learned about yourself.

Ø       If you are allowed to take pictures or videotape of the class, use the data or resources as visual aides. Visual aides are powerful tools for communication.

 B. Program Investigation #2 (45 pts) & Class PP presentation (21 pts) (Due: 12/10)

Complete the identical assignment described above by observing your colleague. Your topic can be different from the topic that you select for the first assignment. 

Grading:
 

A=100-90%

B=89-80%

C=79-70%

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

·   All assignments should be typed. No handwritten assignment will be accepted.

·   All assignments must be turned in on the dates indicated, unless date is changed by instructor.

·   Late assignments will result in 20% reduction of the student’s point total for that assignment.

·   When student submits assignments after due date, you will have one more opportunity to submit the assignments. You can submit the assignment one week after the due date. That means when we meet in class in the following week of the due date, you can submit the assignment. After the second opportunity is passed, I will NOT accept any late submission.

·   Any absence does not excuse students’ responsibility to get assignments turned in on or before due day.

·   Extreme emergency absences and/or due date situation will be handled case by case at the instructor’s discretion. Instructor’s decision is final. Keep instructor informed of any potential personal situations that might necessitate an absence. 

·   The above procedures and calendar (given in class) for this course are tentative and subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances. I reserve the right and responsibility to evaluate the quality of your work. Completion of an assignment does not guarantee the awarding of all possible points.

·   If a student is absent for any reason, the student is still responsible for the information discussed in class that day.

·   For your own protection, always save a copy of any assignment you complete.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week/Date

Topic

Reading Assignment

10/22

Introduction to class:

  • Review of syllabus
  • Expectations
  • Overview of textbook

Ø       PowerPoint Presentation by the instructor

10/29

A Framework for Teaching

Ø       Chapters 1: Enhancing Professional Practice

Ø       The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001: issues and implications for early childhood teacher education by Hyun

Ø       Curriculum issues and trends by Ornstein & Hunkins

11/5

Assumptions and Features of the Framework for Teaching

 

Ø       Chapter 2: Enhancing Professional Practice

Ø       Will standards save public education?

   A sense of Place by Sizer vs.

   The case for standards by Murnane

Ø       From Best Practices by Zemelman, Daniels, & Hyde: Chapter 1: Renewing our schools

11/12

The Four Domains of Teaching Responsibility

 

Ø       Chapter 3: Enhancing Professional Practice

Ø       The case against standardized testing by Kohn

Ø       Standardized tests: whose standards are we talking about? by Platt

11/19

The Framework for Professional Practice: Domain 1. Planning and Preparation

Ø       Chapter 4: Enhancing Professional Practice (pp. 43-63)

Ø       Reinforcing effort and providing recognition by Marzano, Pickering, Pollock

Ø       Homework and practices by Marzano, Pickering, Pollock

Ø       Cooperative Learning by Marzano, Pickering, Pollock

11/26

The Framework for Professional Practice: Domain 2. The Classroom Environment

Ø       Chapter 4: Enhancing Professional Practice (pp. 64-76)

 

Ø       Choosing Democracy by Campbell Ch. 3 : Racism and Schools

12/3

The Framework for Professional Practice: Domain 3. Instruction

Ø       Chapter 4: Enhancing Professional Practice (pp.77-93)

Ø       Assessment in interdisciplinary instruction by Wood

Ø       Designing interdisciplinary units by Wood 

Ø       Castles, Kings… and Standards by Drake

12/10

The Framework for Professional Practice

:Domain 4. professional Responsibilities

Ø       Chapter 4: Enhancing Professional Practice (pp. 94-108)

Ø       Survey and analysis of teacher salary trends 2005

 

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 25

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 25


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 29

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:10/13/2008 8:24:22 PM