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CS 300 Technology in a Global Society
Goodman, George E.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CS 300 Technology in a Global Society

Semester

S2R 2006 SC

Faculty

Goodman, George E.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Arts, Comp Resources & Info Mngt, Webster University, St. Louis , MO

Office Location

Scott Air Force Base Campus

Office Hours

Monday - Thursday 8:00 to 5:00 pm, Friday 8:00 - 12:00 pm

Daytime Phone

(618) 229-9365

Other Phone

(618)  980-2493

E-Mail

SCOT@park.edu

george.goodman@disa.mil

Semester Dates

March 13 2006 - May 7 2006

Class Days

------S

Class Time

8:00 - 1:00 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Depalma, Paul.  Computers in Society, Twelfth edition, McGraw Hill 2005

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore


Course Description:
This course presents the social, political, economic, multicultural, and ethical issues surrounding the use of computers and computer technology. Course  work includes class discussion, readings, collaborative projects and formal  term papers on selected topics.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor will supplement class lectures and problem solving with experience gained through a career as a Information Technology specialist and manager.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize the major historical implications of information technology.
  2. Assess some of the basic concepts of a global society influenced by Information Technology. (Singapore social system, English trading system, Privacy issues, etc.)
  3. Compare some of the effects of technology upon the cultures of different ethnic and racial groups in the United States and other countries. (Literacy and Artistic Expression in all types of media, etc.)
  4. Apply the tools for critical thinking, scientific reasoning and inquiry to emerging technologies and recognize, analyze and evaluate their possible effects upon the social, cultural, economic, and ethical values of the United States and the world. Knowledge of the history of Information Technology is necessary.
  5. Work as a member of a group in exchanging knowledge and ideas about technology and its role in the world.
  6. Collaborate with a group applying the literacies listed above in a mini-term paper format at least 15 to 18 pages (double-spaced) in length. This will provide practice in a group setting before writing the individual term paper.
  7. Maintain an individual electronic journal of all readings and reference sources in a word-processed journal to be handed in bi-weekly.
  8. Write a term paper using a modified format similar to that found in scientific technical journals. The paper will be at least 15 to 18 pages in length (double-spaced) and demonstrate evidence of applying the literacies to the topic.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and evaluate how computers have influenced a change in the workplace.
  2. Understand and explain the risks of Information Technology.
  3. Recognize, analyze and evaluate the possible effects of information technology on the social, cultural, economic, and ethical values of the United States and the world.
Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
Assessment will be based upon weekly homework.
The student will be assigned chapters to read and study
in the text.
Midterm and Final.
Journal.

Grading:
There will be a Midterm exam worth 20 points and a Final exam worth 20 points. The journal/group project and presentation are worth 50 points. Homework and class participation are worth 5 points each. Grading standards are based on a typical A (90%), B (80%), C (70%), D (60%), F (less than 60%) scale.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Work is to be turned in by the deadline.  Talk to the instructor for special circumstances.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Students are expected to leave the room to take phone calls and to respond to beepers. Notebook computers are allowed in the classroom.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Week 1:
Introduce myself and have students introduce themselves; then go over syllabus. Discuss the goals of the class and talk about group project requirements. Talk about journal/group project requirements. We will cover Unit 1.  Students can pick three articles to research for presentation and turn-in the following week.

Week 2:
We will cover Unit 2.   There will be discussion of articles assigned from the previous class. Students can pick three articles to research for presentation, and turn-in the following week.

Week 3:
We will cover Unit 3 and start Unit 4.  There will be discussion of articles assigned from the previous class. Students can pick three articles to research for presentation and turn-in the following week.

Week 4:
We will finish Unit 4.  There will be discussion of articles assigned from the previous class.  We will review for the midterm. After review students can get into groups and work on project for the remainder of class.

Week 5:
Midterm exam. After test we will summarize what we have learned from the previous articles.  We will start Unit 5.  Students can pick four articles to research for presentation and turn-in the following class.

Week 6:
We will finish Unit 5 and do Unit 6.  There will be discussion of articles assigned from the previous class. Students can pick four articles to research for presentation and turn-in the following week.  Work on projects for the remainder of class.


Week 7:
We will cover Unit 7 and Unit 8.  Turn in journals/group projects. Review for final exam. Start presentations.

Week 8:
Take final exam. Finish up presentations.

 

Class Activities

Assignments

Tests

Meeting - 1

 

 

 

Meeting - 2

 

 

 

Meeting - 3

 

 

 

Meeting - 4

 

 

 

Meeting - 5

 

 

 

Meeting - 6

 

 

 

Meeting - 7

 

 

 

Meeting - 8

 

 

 


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

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