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PS 402 Systems of Psychotherapy
Crowe, Leif C.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

PS 402 Systems of Psychotherapy

Semester

S2M 2006 CH

Faculty

Crowe, Leif C.

Title

Adjunct Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D., Clinical Psychology

E-Mail

lcrowe@park.edu

USE THIS ADDRESS:  profcrowe@yahoo.com

Semester Dates

March 13, 2006 - May 7, 2006

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

4:45 - 7:15 PM

Prerequisites

PS101 and either PS401 or PS315, and junior or senior standing.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Theory and Practice of Counseling & Psychotherapy, 7th Ed. (2005), by Gerald Corey.  Thomson Learning:  Brooks/Cole.

Student Manual for Theory and Practice of Counseling & Psychotherapy, 7th Ed. (2005), by Gerald Corey.  Thomson Learning:  Brooks/Cole.

BOTH BOOKS ARE REQUIRED.

Warning!  This course requires a large amount of reading.  If you are not a good reader, do not like to read, or do not have time to read, do not take this course.

Students are expected to read the assigned material before each class.  

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO TAKE THIS COURSE WITHOUT A TEXTBOOK AND MANUAL.

NOTICE FROM PARK UNIVERSITY:  Students are required to order their books and have them available for the first night of class.  It is recommended to order your books through MBS.  Many students are having trouble getting their books from companies other than MBS, often not receiving them until the 4th week.  If you purchase a used text, be sure it is the correct edition.  Instructors should not and will not delay instruction due to students not having their books.

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Majoring In Psychology:
Introduction to Psychology (2005), 7th Ed., by Rod Plotnik (excellent Intro textbook).
The Psychology Major:  Careers and Strategies For Success, by Eric Landrum
Forty Studies That Changed Psychology, by Roger Hock
How To Think Like A Psychologist, by Donald McBurney (question/answer format)
Experiencing Psychology, by Gary Brannigan (hands-on activities)
"Psychology Today" Magazine  

Relating To Others:
How To Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie
Emotional Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman, Ph.D.

Relationships and Marriage:
Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus, by John Gray, Ph.D.
Why Marriages Succeed Or Fail, by John Gottman (1995)

Understanding Preteens/Adolescents:
Reviving Ophelia:  Saving The Selves of Adolescent Girls, by Mary Pipher, Ph.D.
Raising Cain:  Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys, by Dan Kindlon, Ph.D., and Michael Thompson, Ph.D.

Counseling/Psychotherapy:
Inside Therapy:  Illuminating Writings About Therapists, Patients, and Psychotherapy, by Irvin D. Yalom
The Fifty Minute Hour, by Robert Lindner
Basic Counseling Techniques:  A Beginning Therapist's Toolkit, by C. Wayne Perry
Favorite Counseling and Therapy Techniques:  51 Therapists Share Their Most Creative Strategies, by Howard G. Rosenthal
Effective Helping:  Interviewing and Counseling Techniques, by Barbara F. Okun
Introducing Psychotherapy, by Nigel Benson
Adult Children of Alcoholics, by Janet Gerringer Woititz, Ed.D.
Alcoholics Anonymous
The Sexual Healing Journal:  A Guide for Survivors of Sexual Abuse, by Wendy Maltz
Homecoming, by John Bradshaw

Just for Fun:
Understanding Your Therapist:  Or Why Is This Taking So Long? by Robert H. Pilpel

http://www.apa.org
http://www.psychologytoday.com

Course Description:
Explores the major schools of psychotherapy.  The course includes an extensive use of actual case studies.  Pre-requisites:  PS101, PS401 or PS315 and junior or senior standing.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
To learn, you must want to be taught.
(Proverbs 12:1)

My educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, exams, case studies, discussions, class exercises, audio/video material, and student demonstrations.

A 400-level course is an opportunity for students to sample a near-graduate-level experience.  This course will include a seminar approach to engage each learner in preparation, presentation, and discussion of material.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a basic level of competence in the use of vocabulary found in psychotherapy.
  2. Compare and contrast among the major schools in psychotherapy.
  3. Critique and evaluate the treatment and practice of psychotherapy.
  4. Identify ethical issues in psychotherapy.
  5. Identify appropriate psychotherapeutic concepts in case studies.


Core Assessment:


Class Assessment:
Grades will be based on one midterm and one final exam (each worth 75 points), class participation (discussions/activities) worth a total of 40 points, worksheets worth 70 points, and manual exercises worth a total of 40 points.

MIDTERM AND FINAL EXAMS: will consist of short answer essay, identification, and multiple choice questions, worth a total of 75 points each.  A review session will be held before each exam.  

WORKSHEETS involve answering a number of questions related to the reading assignment for the class.  Worksheets must be turned in at the beginning of the class period for which they are assigned.  Late submissions will not be accepted unless due to an excused absence with written verification.

CLASS PARTICIPATION points will be based on active participation in discussion, which includes being prepared by having read assigned material in advance.  Obviously, you must be present to earn participation points.

Manual exercises include self-inventories and pretests to prepare you for the new information.  Worksheets consist of questions about the assigned chapter.

Class Preparation:  Please bring both your textbook and manual, a spiral notebook (for notetaking) a pen, and a highlighter to every class.

Manual exercises and pretests must be completed in the manual in pencil or ink.  Please do not write answers on separate sheets of paper or use photocopies of manual pages.  

ESL:  If English is not your first language, you are welcome to use a language dictionary in class.  You may want to consider tutoring.

Grading:
Midterm Exam worth 75 points
  Class Participation/Activities worth 40 points
  Worksheets worth 70 points (7 points each)
  Manual Exercises worth 40 points (4 points each)  
+ Final Exam worth 75 points  
= 300 Possible Points

In assigning grades, I will use the following scale:

(93% - 100%)= A

(84% - 92%) =  B

(75% - 83%) =  C

(68% - 74%) =  D

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Worksheets will not be accepted if submitted late, unless due to an excused absence with written verification.  Manual exercises will lose one point for each class period overdue.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
1.  Be present for each class.  

2.  Be on time.  

3.  Be prepared by having read any assignments in advance of the class, completed any manual assignments or worksheets carefully and completely, and having your seminar presentation ready on time.

4.  Respect the opinions of others.

5.  Participate actively and constructively in class discussions and activities.  

Following these rules contributes toward classroom participation points.

For written assignments:  Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must also recognize that technology can cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students are responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, back up your hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

LIGHT EATING/DRINKING WILL BE PERMITTED IN THE CLASSROOM PROVIDED IT DOES NOT DISTURB OTHERS.  Please clean up after yourself.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
3/14
Orientation

3/16
A.   Introduction
Chapter 1
Manual:  pp. 6-11
Worksheet due for chapter 1.

3/20
Last Day of Drop/Add

3/21
B.   The Counselor
Chapter 2
Manual:  pp. 12-18; 26-29
Worksheet due for chapter 2.

3/23
C.  Ethical Issues for Counselors
Chapter 3
Manual:  pp. 31-2  

3/28
D.   Psychoanalytic/Dynamic Therapy
Chapter 4
Manual:  pp. 41-2
Worksheet due for chapter 4.

3/30
E.  Existential Therapy
Chapter 6
Manual:  pp. 70-1; 74-5
Worksheet due for chapter 6.

4/4
Review Session

* You can prepare for the midterm by reviewing your study guides/worksheets and by completing the manual comprehension quizzes for each chapter (answers on pg. 266).

4/6
Midterm Exam

4/11
F.  Person-Centered Therapy    
Chapter 7
Manual:  pp. 81-2; 85-6
Worksheet due for chapter 7.  

4/13
G.  Behavioral Therapy      
Chapter 9
Manual:  pp. 105-6; 110-111
Worksheet due for chapter 9.

4/14
Last Day to Withdraw From a Course

4/18
H.  To Be Determined

4/20
H.  Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Chapter 10
Manual:  pp. 122-3
Worksheet due for chapter 10.  

4/25
I.  Reality Therapy
Chapter 11
Manual:  pp. 138-9
Worksheet due for chapter 11.
   
4/27
K.  Integrative Approach to Stan
Chapter 16
Manual:  pp. 197-200

5/2
Review Session

* You can prepare for the final exam by reviewing your study guides/worksheets and by completing the manual comprehension quizzes for each chapter (answers on pg. 266).    

5/4
Final Exam  
 
5/4
Conclusion & Discussion

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Copyright:

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