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IS 316 Computer Systems Analysis and Design II
Baxter, Randall S.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseIS 316 Computer Systems Analysis and Design II
SemesterF2U2004
FacultyBaxter, Randall S.
TitleAdjunct Faculty
Degrees/CertificatesMasters in Public Administration
Bachelors in Computer Science
Office Hours6AM - 4PM
Daytime Phone602-274-5359 x1287
E-MailRandall.Baxter@park.edu
rbaxter@graphicblast.com
Web Pagehttp://www.graphicblast.com/park.html
Semester Dates18 Oct - 12 Dec
Class Days-M-W---
Class Time7:30 - 10:10 PM
PerquisitesIS 315
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Kendall, Systems Analysis & Design, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004, ISBN 0131188798.
Bundled with: Visible Analyst Workbench 7.5 CD

Course Description:
Continuation of IS315. The student will continue to study the concepts and methods used in a system development life cycle.  In addition, the student will gain practical experience by working on various projects.  The student will use a CASE tool for his/her project work. Pre-requisite: IS315. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The educational philosophy of the instructor is one of interactiveness based on lectures, labs, and individual projects. Teaching techniques to be used in this course will consist of a mixture of the following:
· Lectures
· Group Labs
· Quizzes
· Exams

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:
  1. Distinguish logical versus physical models and translate logical process and data models into physical design models using design/ CASE software.
  2. Evaluate and make architectural design decisions given a problem scenario:
       ·Client Server
       ·Centralized versus Decentralized
       ·Database and distribution of data
       ·User and system interface alternatives(inputs/outputs)
  3. Understand and explain design principles for Input/Output with regard to human interaction and user acceptability.
  4. Understand and explain advantages and disadvantages of data storage options (i.e. Relational Database, Object Database, Conventional Files and Data Warehouse)
  5. Practice key concepts of analysis and design as well as advance techniques such as JAD, Prototyping, USE CASES and/or other OOA/OOD techniques.
  6. Evaluate strengths/weaknesses and applicable roles of several strategies/methodologies for design of information systems including Model Driven, RAD, Agile, OO development, and Prototyping.
  7. Understand the role of Quality Assurance and multiple steps that can be taken in all phases of development to ensure a quality product and user acceptance.
  8. Build communication skills, both oral and written as well as teamwork.

Course Assessment:

Quizzes will be given at the beginning of class each Monday. They will be closed book. These quizzes will be 15 minutes in length. The primary nature of the quizzes is to enforce your understanding and recall of terminology, conventions, and techniques from your reading assignment.
  · Exams (Midterm and Final)
  · Individual Projects - Homework assignments are individual projects. They will be due each Monday at the beginning of class. You will be graded on the content as well as neatness.

Grading:
The following grading criteria will be used for all students within this course:

Qty. Type Pts. Each Total Pts Weighted%
4 Quizzes 15 60 10%
5 Homework Assignments 50 250 43%
1 Midterm Exam 120 120 21%
1 Final Exam 150 150 26%
Maximum Points Available 580

Grade Chart
A 580 to 522
B 521 to 464
C 463 to 406
D 405 to 348
F Below 348

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All class homework and projects are due on the scheduled date or no points will be awarded for that assignment.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Holding class in a lab environment can greatly contribute to your understanding of the topic at hand allowing you to can some hands-on experience with the instructor present. Please utilize this opportunity. To gain the most from this educational experience, try to refrain from browsing the Internet during lectures. Computers can also make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drive crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

  · All students are expected to read the specified chapters identified in the section – COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS prior to the specified meeting date.
  · Students will also be required to complete individual homework projects and have them turned in by the specified due date.
  · Students will be expected to successfully complete the periodic quizzes, midterm and final exams.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
All class meetings will be from 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM

Week 1
Oct 18 – Read Chapter 8 prior to class
    Introductions
    Syllabus review
    Lecture/Discussion
   
Oct 20 – Lecture/Discussion
    Lab
  Assign Project 1 (50 points)
Week 2
Oct 25 – Read Chapter 10 prior to class
Turn in Project 1
Quiz 1 (15 Points)
Lecture/Discussion


Oct 27 – Review Quiz 1
    Lecture/Discussion
Lab
  Assign Project 2 (50 points)

Week 3
Nov 1  – Read Chapter 11 prior to class
Turn in Project 2
Quiz 2 (15 Points)
Lecture/Discussion

Nov 3   – Review Quiz 2
    Lecture/Discussion
Lab
  Assign Project 3 (50 points)

Week 4
Nov 8 –   Read Chapter 12 prior to class
Lecture/Discussion
Lab


Nov 10 –   MIDTERM EXAM (120 Points)
 

Week 5
Nov 15 –   Read Chapter 13 prior to class
Lecture/Discussion


Nov 17 – Lecture/Discussion
Lab
  Assign Project 4 (50 points)


Week 6
Nov 22 – Read Chapter 14 prior to class
Turn in Project 4
Quiz 3 (15 Points)
Lecture/Discussion




Nov 24 – Review Quiz 3
    Lecture/Discussion
Lab
  Assign Project 5 (50 points)

Week 7
Nov 29 – Read Chapter 15 prior to class
Turn in Project 5
Quiz 4 (15 Points)
Lecture/Discussion


Dec 1 – Review Quiz 4
    Lecture/Discussion
Lab

Week 8
Dec 6 – Read Chapter 16 prior to class
  Lecture/Discussion
Lab
 
Dec 8 – Final Exam (150 points)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergradute Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergradute Catalog Page 100


Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.