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CH 301 Chemistry and Society
Shen, Jeff (Ji)


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CH 301 Chemistry and Society

Semester

F2T 2006 DL

Faculty

Shen, Jeff (Ji)

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

PhD Pharmacology
MS Pharmacology; Computer Information Systems
BS Chemistry

Office Location

Online

Office Hours

24/7

Daytime Phone

614.234.3411

Other Phone

614.234.5800

E-Mail

jeff.shen@pirate.park.edu

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Required Text: Chemistry in Context, 5th ed, McGraw Hill.

Authors: Conrad Stanitski, Lucy Eubanks, Catherine Middlecamp, Norbert Pienta, Wilmur Stratton
ISBN: 0073101591
Book Website: http://chemincontext.eppg.com/

Order Texts at: http://direct.mbsbooks.com/park.htm

Chemistry in Context 5e

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
The history and nature of the science of chemistry with emphasis upon its role as a human activity and its relationship to humanity. Open to all junior and senior level students. 3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the basics of chemistry: components of an atom, molecules, and mixtures, acids and bases.  Describe differences between elements, compounds and mixtures.
  2. Describe and explain the physical properties of water and the earth's water cycles, and the impact that society has made on the earth's water quality from a chemical perspective.
  3. Explain the impact of global warming, ozone layer and air pollution on the environment and the role of society in its cause and prevention.
  4. Explain the importance of balanced nutrition and the different nutrients (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) on the body.
  5. Describe the drug approval process and explain the impact of medicines in our society.
  6. Explain the properties of consumer items like soaps, plastics and other polymeric materials.
  7. Develop and apply research and critical thinking skills while reading newspapers magazines, scientific journals, and the internet.
  8. Be able to write scientific papers with appropriate writing skills.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. use the properties of the phases of matter to explain the greenhouse effect.
  2. use the concept of the mole to solve problems.
  3. explain and use the laws of thermodynamics from a chemist's perspective. They will be able to use them to solve problems.
  4. explain the unique properties of water that make life of Earth possible.
  5. explain acids bases and their interaction.
  6. explain the causes for acid rain, its impact on the environment, and mitigation procedures.
Core Assessment:

This will be a final exam worth 20-25% of the final grade.  It will have the following:

  • contain     questions on 70-90% of the core learning objectives,
  • have     some short answer questions,
  • have     some true and false, multiple choice or fill in the blanks questions,
  • assess     terminology taught in the course as per learning objectives,
  • some     element of compare and contrast of concepts covered in the learning     objectives, and
  • questions     that can be answered in 1-2 paragraph on any explanatory/comparative/ethics/opinion     content.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Current News: Students will be expected to read magazines and newspapers and submit a summary of about 100 words on one scientific news article of their choice.  They should include: a) what they read, b) what they found interesting about it, c) if they have any opinion about it and e) the reference.  This will enable them to develop reading habit and keep them updated with the current events. There will be a maximum of four such reports to be submitted by each student.  This will be posted in the Current News tab under Discussions. Students will get credit for dicussing their peer's current reports.

Weekly Informative reports: The students will express their views on an issue assigned by the instructor.  They should be able to defend their point of view by articulately expressing themselves and backing their opinion by facts, hence references is an integral part of this report.  Students will generally get a minimum of a week to work on these reports. The report should be roughly 600 - 700 words long excluding the references.  There will be a maximum of six reports.  These will be submitted in the Drop Box each week by the assigned date and time.

Class participation: During the course some discussion topics will be given to the class, to which the students are expected to respond. This will be carried out in the discussion area. Students are expected to visit the discussion area at least twice a week, give their opinion and defend it articulately. This is one of the most important part of the course. It will help establish a communication between the students and the instructor and also among the entire class. Students are expected to question each others statements and challenge each other to think. Each week of constructive participation will earn them points. Constructive participation means responding to comments made in the class and taking initiative to bring interesting topics in the discussion forum.

Quizzes: There will some short quizzes during the weeks.  Completion of these is a course requirement.

Research paper: The topic will be entirely the students choice.  They can research on one scientific - chemistry related topic that they are interested in.  Primary reasons for choosing a topic should be: 1) they are interested in it, 2) they have found a significant amount of information on this topic, 3) it is a current topic (up to 5 years old) and 4) it has been approved by the instructor.  Most times students get carried away with the vast number of interesting issues that they lose focus. To avoid this, a topic of interest should be submitted to the instructor within the first three weeks of classes; a rough, one page draft submitted two weeks after the submission of the topic, with four to five references, and the final report due two days before the final exam.  It is important to remain focused on the topic of interest.  The student will be allowed to change the topic only once and not later than five weeks into the course.

Final exam: A final proctored examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location.  It will a comprehensive exam. It will be based on the discussion topics and the informative reports that the students have written. To help the students understand the kind of questions they can expect on the exam, practice quizzes will be available on the web.

Information on proctored exams: For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test.  Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

  • It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor. 
  • Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor. 
  • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval. 
  • Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.

Grading:

90% and above A
80 - 89 %  B
70 - 79 %  C
60 - 69 %  D
59% and below F

Each student is responsible for:

  • Completing weekly writing Homework (reports).
  • Completing weekly discussion questions.
  • Completing all quizzes.
  • Completing Final Term Paper
  • Completing a Final Examination.

Grades Assignment

Quizzes 16%
Weekly Homework 28%
Class Discussion: Continually 16%
Research paper: Due at the end of the semester 20%
Final Exam: During the last week of the semester 20%

 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Dates for submitting assignments will be provided by instructor.  Students will be notified a week ahead of any change in the date or time of assignment.

  1. Informative Reports: 20% of the score will be deducted for each day the assignment is submitted late. Assignments submitted after one week will not be accepted for grading.
  2. Current Reports: 30% will be deducted if the report is submitted one day late and no credit given after the one day tardiness.
  3. Class Discussion: Students should not go to the previous week's discussion to post thier views/discussion/assignment.  We will always be moving ahead, never behind.
  4. Final Exam: Cannot be made up at all. 
  5. Quiz or Reading Assignment: Student cannot makeup an internet quiz or reading assignment given for a particular week at a later week.  It is imperative that students keep current in the class.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Class participation: Students are expected participate in the class.  Constructive participation means responding to comments made in the class and taking initiative to bring interesting topics in the discussion forum (see below for details on on-line participation).

 

On Line Participation

This course is offered on line, over the Internet and the World Wide Web, using eCollge technology and courseware, which allows students to participate at any time, from any location. Because of this flexibility, it is important to plan your time carefully.

  • Students are expected to sign in to the class discussion (your "virtual classroom") and participate in discussions and other activities at least four times per week. You should expect to spend a minimum of four hours per class week on line, the same amount of time you'd spend in the physical classroom.
  • You'll be sending and receiving E mail, performing on line research and participating in Web explorations and "virtual tours," and interacting socially and professionally with classmates.
  • A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Saturday. The first week begins the first day of the semester and ends midnight the following Saturday.
  • Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed by Sunday of the week assigned. Writing assignments and papers should be completed and successfully submitted, or postmarked, so that they are in the instructors hands on the due date.

NOTE: Because this is an online course designed to get feedback on assignments to you directly via Internet, you must make prior arrangements with the instructor  before submitting a paper via fax or the postal service. If you ever have problems transmitting your assignments, telephone me immediately, and we'll get the problem solved.

Ground Rules for On line Participation

  • Students should use E-Mail for private messages to the instructor and other students. The Class Discussion is for public messages.
  • Students are expected to complete 4 hours per week of discussion or other appropriate online activities, including sending/receiving E mail and navigating and conducting research over the web.
  • All students will participate in discussion. Conventions of "on line etiquette," which include courtesy to all users, will be observed.
  • Students will submit the papers in the Dropbox area.
  • Assigned papers may be submitted via the postal service or fax only if  arrangements are made with the instructor beforehand.

The above policies are in addition to Park's Online course policies at http://captain.park.edu/portal/online_course_policies.htm.


 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Welcome to Chemistry and Society (CH301), on line! This course focuses on the need for increasing science literacy in today's society in order to better understand our world. By the end of course the student will be able to take logical and a scientific approach to decision making by virtue of being more educated in science. This is an extensive writing course (several reports are to be submitted in the duration of the course); hence students are expected to be able to communicate effectively and defend themselves articulately and logically. We will be carrying out weekly discussions on current issues. All students are expected to keep up with new literature. Dedicate at least two hours per week reading magazines and newspapers.

The goal of this course is to educate the students about the impact chemistry has on our lives and the society. Chemistry is the basic science involved in every walk of our life. We all need to be more educated in science so we can lead a safer and healthier life. Even politics is not devoid of science. Many policy makers make important decision about our lives without a formal education in science or chemistry. Every citizen should be scientifically literate to understand their surrounding. Each week we'll focus on different new writing situations, issues, or problems encountered in the workplace through our online conferencing discussions; these are reinforced and expanded in readings in our text, Chemistry in Context.

During Week 1, You are advised to read the lecture for this part: 1) we will begin with a brief history of chemistry; when and how it began; what were the problems initial scientists faced and how they eventually overcame the close mindedness of people!! 2) we will then move on to learn about the scientific method; 3) study and classification of matter; 4) basic measurements used in chemistry; 5) difference between physical and chemical properties; 6) a brief introduction to the periodic table and 7) structure of atom.

During Week 2, We will discuss radioactivity/ nuclear chemistry, the basic principles and applications. We will move on to Energy. What is energy; law of conservation of energy; sources of energy - medieval, old and current.

During Week 3, The environment. What is the earth made up of - our major constitution of the earth's crust (stratosphere), water (hydrosphere) and air (atmosphere). Air pollution: problems, solutions and preventions.

During Week 4, Water pollution and solid waste disposal. Causes. prevention and solution.

During Week 5, Medicinal chemistry. Serendipity, targeted research and folk medicine in finding new drugs. Role of FDA in drug approval process. Which one was the first synthetic drug and increasing need for new medicines. Controversial use of narcotics as medicinal drugs.

During Week 6, Consumer chemistry. Chemistry of cosmetics, health and beauty aid products (shampoo, soaps), detergents. Principles behind their cleansing action. Pollution caused by detergents and development environmental friendly products.

During Week 7, Food chemistry. What is the makeup of our body. What are the essential elements needed for our lives. Why some chemicals are harmful and why we need to have a balanced diet.

During Week 8, Genetic engineering. Structure of DNA; we will learn about mutation, cloning and the potential dangers of these processes.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Describes all the following:
•components of an atom, molecules, and mixtures, acids and bases.  Describe differences between elements, compounds and mixtures.
•physical properties of water and the earth's water cycles, and the impact that society has made on the earth's water quality from a chemical perspective
•the impact of global warming, ozone layer and air pollution on the environment and the role of society in its cause and prevention
•the importance of balanced nutrition and the different nutrients (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) on the body
•the drug approval process and explain the impact of medicines in our society
•the properties of consumer items like soaps, plastics and other polymeric materials
 
Describes 60-70% of the content in the preceding column Describes 50 – 60 % of the content in the preceding column Able to describe less than 50% of the content in the preceding column 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Be able to show connections in all the above principles Be able to show connections amongst 60-70% of the above principles Be able to show connections amongst 60-50% of the above principles Be able to show connections amongst less than 50% of the above principles 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Use the information given to identify a problem and make connections to analyse a problem in a scientific way with critical thinking. Use the information given to establish the problem and analyses the problem but does not make the connections to other information learned in the course Use the information given to analyse the problem without critical thinking or making connections to other information learned in the course Unable to identify the problem or analyse it with any critical thinking or connections to information provided. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
•Apply all the above concepts to understand the recent literature and news on chemistry related topics.  
•Exhibit critical and analytical thinking in applying the principles learned in the course to solve a problem.
 
•Apply 70-60% of the above concepts to understand the recent literature and news on chemistry related topics.  
•Exhibit critical and analytical thinking in applying the principles learned in the course to solve a problem.
 
•Apply 50-60% of the above concepts to understand the recent literature and news on chemistry related topics.  
•Does not exhibit critical and analytical thinking in applying the principles learned in the course to solve a problem.
 
•Applies less than 50% of  the above concepts to understand the recent literature and news on chemistry related topics.
•Unable to exhibit critical and analytical thinking in applying the principles learned in the course to solve a problem.
 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Writes the exam in proper English, complete sentences and according to the scientific terms and  guidelines and makes the connections wherever appropriate. Completes the exam with all appropriate answers within scientific terms and guidelines. Able to complete the exam but without scientific terms and guidelines. Unable to write the exam in proper English, complete sentences and according to the scientific terms and guidelines. Does not show any connections between the concepts learned. 
Technical Skill in Communicating written essay                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Explain the chemistry involved in questions given in the exam. Explain 70-60% of the chemistry involved in the questions. Explain 50-60% of the chemistry involved in the questions. Explains less than 50% of chemistry involved in questions given in the exam. 

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Last Updated:10/12/2006 9:44:13 AM