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CJ 441 Senior Writing Project
Getty, Carol P.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 441 Senior Writing Project

Semester

F1T 2006 DL

Faculty

Getty, Carol P

Title

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Department Chair

Degrees/Certificates

PhD, University of Missouri - Kansas City
MS, University of Arizona
BA, Wellesley College

Office Location

Mackay 20B, Parkville Campus

Office Hours

T and R: 8:30 - 10; Wed.: 8-11 CST

Daytime Phone

816-584-6336

E-Mail

carol.getty@park.edu

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/cgetty

Semester Dates

August 21-October 15, 2006

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

Students must be currently working in the criminal justice field and have permission of the department chair or their advisor to be in the course.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
There are no required texts, but you must be reading on the subject of your project.  Although much of the supporting material will come from your observations and analysis, interviews, and the like, you should be reading about you subject.  Please ask for suggested reading after you have looked at the online databases, asked your boss or others in your agency for reading materials,  looked in a library, and asked for assistance from your classmates.  I would be happy to assist you but only after you have done some work.

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
This capstone course may be taken instead of CJ 440, Internship in Criminal Justice. It is designed for students currently employed in a criminal justice field who do not need the practical experience of an internship. Students in this course must design, implement, evaluate, analyze, and/or critique a project connected to their work environment in written format. This course may be taken online or an independent study in a face to face setting. The student's advisor or the department chair must approve students to substitute this course for the internship. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
My educational philosophy is one of interactiveness.  Learners will engage in lively exploration of ideas and issues relating to their project as well as those of their classmates.  Students who excell will submit materials in the prescribed manner and in timely fashion.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and analyze different approaches to a problem/situation in your work environment
  2. Design a possible correction solution to the problem/situation
  3. Apply the corrective solution or offer it to your organization as a possible solution
  4. Design an annotated bibliography with at least 10 sources
  5. Defend the senior writing project face-to-face or telephonically to the instructor


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. 1. Identify and analyze different approaches to a problem/situation in your work environment
  2. 2.  Design a possible corrective solution to the problem/situation
  3. 3.  Apply the corrective solution or offer it to your organization as a possible solution.
  4. 4.  Write up the details of the prject with a minimum of 20 pages
  5. 5.  Design an annotated bibliography with at least 10 sources
  6. 6.  Defend the senior writing project face-to-face or telephonically to the instructor
Core Assessment:

Students in this course must identify a problem/situation in their work environment which could be improved, research possible solutions to the identified problem/situation., evaluate these, propose a solution based on their work environment, implement the solution or propose the solution to appropriate person(s).  Students must write a 20 page paper explaining their project.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

For the Project 

The Superior Paper: A

Project itself: Easily identifiable, plausible, novel, sophisticated, insightful, and crystal clear.

Structure: Evident, understandable, and appropriate for project. Excellent transitions from point to point. Paragraphs support solid topic sentences.

Use of evidence: Primary source information used to buttress every point with at least one example. Examples support mini-points and fit within paragraph. Excellent integration of quoted material into sentences.

Analysis: Author clearly relates evidence to "mini-points” (topic sentence); analysis is fresh and exciting, posing new ways to think of the material.

Logic and Argumentation: all ideas in the paper flow logically; the argument is identifiable, reasonable, and sound. Author anticipates and successfully defuses counter-arguments; makes novel connections to outside materials (from other parts of the class, or other classes) which illuminate the project.

Mechanics: Sentence structure, grammar, and diction excellent; correct use of punctuation and citation style; minimal to no spelling errors; absolutely no run-on sentences or comma splices.

The Good Paper: B

Project itself: Promising, but may be slightly unclear, or lacking in insight or originality.

Structure: Generally clear and appropriate, though may wander occasionally. May have a few unclear transitions, or a few paragraphs without strong topic sentences.

Use of evidence: Examples used to support most points. Some evidence does not support point, or may appear where inappropriate. Quotes well integrated into sentences.

Analysis: Evidence often related to mini-points, though links perhaps not very clear.

Logic and argumentation: Argument of paper is clear, usually flows logically and makes sense. Some evidence that counter-arguments acknowledged though perhaps not addressed. Occasional insightful connections to outside material made.         

Mechanics: Sentence structure, grammar, and diction strong despite occasional lapses; punctuation and citation style often used correctly. Some (minor) spelling errors; may have one run-on sentence or    comma splice.

The Borderline Paper: C

Project itself: May be unclear (contain many vague terms), appear unoriginal, or offer relatively little that is new; provides little around which to structure the paper.

Structure: Generally unclear, often wanders or jumps around. Few or weak transitions, many paragraphs without topic sentences.

Use of evidence: Examples used to support some points. Points often lack supporting evidence, or evidence used where inappropriate (often because there may be no clear point). Quotes may be poorly integrated into sentences.

Analysis: Quotes appear often without analysis relating them to mini-thesis (or there is a weak mini-thesis to support), or analysis offers nothing beyond the quote.

Logic and argumentation: Logic may often fail, or argument may often be unclear. May not address counter-arguments or make any outside connections.

Mechanics: Problems in sentence structure, grammar, and diction (usually not major). Errors in punctuation, citation style, and spelling. May have several run-on sentences or comma splices.

The "Needs Help" Paper: D

Project itself: Difficult to identify at all, may be bland restatement of obvious point.

Structure: Unclear, often because thesis is weak or non-existent. Transitions confusing and unclear. Few topic sentences.

Use of evidence: Very few or very weak examples. General failure to support statements, or evidence seems to support no statement. Quotes not integrated into sentences; "plopped in" in improper manner.

Analysis: Very little or very weak attempt to relate evidence to argument; may be no identifiable argument, or no evidence to relate it to.

Logic and argumentation: Ideas do not flow at all, usually because there is no argument to support. Simplistic view of topic; no effort to grasp possible alternative views.

Mechanics: Big problems in sentence structure, grammar, and diction. Frequent major errors in citation style, punctuation, and spelling. May have many run-on sentences and comma splices.

 The Failing Paper: F

Shows obviously minimal lack of effort or comprehension of the assignment. Very difficult to understand owing to major problems with mechanics, structure, and analysis. Has no identifiable thesis, or utterly incompetent thesis.

(Adapted from material from Goucher College website)

For the Discussion  

1.       Identification of what you learned from your weekly activities working on your project and/or from your classmates and professor

2.       Sufficient depth of your interpretation of the information

3.       Thoughtful reflection of context made applicable to material

4.       Explanation of any changes in (or deeper conviction) to your perspective on content/discussion in class.

Additional Components for consideration: grammar, spelling, clarity, appearance

For Responses in Discussion Area

Required Components:

1.       Evaluation and response of three or  more peers

2.       Sufficient depth in responding

3.       Thoughtful reflection of agreement or disagreement with peers

4.       Explanation of any changes in (or deeper conviction to ) your perspective

Additional Components for consideration: grammar, spelling, clarity, appearance

For The Defense

 Required Components

1.       Clear description of project, which may include some background about reasons for selection of the problem/situation

2.       Well-articulated description of the proposed or implemented solution

3.       Evaluation or critical analysis of the solution    

4.     Report of need for further exploration

 

 

 

 

Grading:

90% = A (exceptional work)
80% = B (outstanding work)
70% = C (meets minimum standards)
65% = D (below minimum standards)

Entries in Discussion Area about Project

20 points each week

160 points total

Responses in Discussion Area to classmates or the professor *

20 points each week

160 points total

Curriculum Project

600 point

600 points total

Defense of Project 

  80 points

  80 points total

A = 900-1000 points

B = 800-899 points

C = 700-799 points

D= 600-699 points

 

* To receive full points students should make at least three significant responses to others

Feedback

You will be receiving feedback from me periodically - some is scheduled, and some is not. The feedback I usually give comes in four forms:

1. Public reply to an individual or group in the discussion area

2. Private e-mail to express delight or concern

3. Interim Grade report  which you receive at midterm from me by private e-mail

4. Final Grade Report which I will send to you by private e-mail at the end of final week of the course

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

1. Students should use e-mail for private messages to the professor and other students. The Discussion area is for public messages.

2. THE DROPBOX
 Use the the Dropbox to turn in homework assignments. The Dropbox is the second tab from the right at the top of your screen. Follow the instructions in Homework to
 submit
  your work.

3. Students are expected to complete more than an hour per week in the discussion area and several hours working on their project. Students taking an internship must work 135  hours for three hours of credit and then spend several hours meeting with the professor, writing weekly journal entries, and writing a brief four to five page paper. In an eight-week format, you should be working on the project for more than ten hours and in the conference area for more than one.

4. In order for you to be marked present each week, you must be in the classroom, the discussion area.  You must write a progress report about the topic of discussion and significantly respond to those of others.  Two weeks of absence and you are dropped from the course.

NO LATE ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED unless you have special permission before the deadline.

5. If personal computers malfunction, please make other arrangements to seek online access through public library computers, community colleges, etc.  I recommend that you do NOT wait until the last minute to submit assignments, as computer errors or glitches can be expected.  In a course of this type, which hinges on completion of a single project, if something can go wrong, it will.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Each student will be an important member of the learning community and class participation represents a substantial component of this course. Moreover, the learning created through class discussion/postings, collaborative group work, and experiential learning will be essential for developing an understanding of course material.

Weekly Entries in the Discussion Area about Your Porject(160 points) This should be a descriptive as well as a reflective entry in the discussion area. Thus, you may write that you interviewed Captain John Smith and he possessed a wealth of information (descriptive) but then add that you wish you had tape recorded your session because you forgot some crucial points (reflective). In the first week you may be discussing several projects and then commenting about why you decided on the project you did.

Discussion and Responses (160 points) These responses are to entries posted by your classmates. You should post at least three and they must be significant. You should spend more than an hour preparing these minimally three responses. Posting responses similar to others will not be meaningful , and the response that I agree or the comment that this is an interesting subject will not be considered significant. Quality counts more than quantity here. Since you are employed in the CJ field, you should have information to shareabout where classmates might look for information

Project (600 points) The project requires development by the student and then a written report about what the student studied, implemented, analyzed, with a minimum of 20 pages and an annotated bibliography. Sections of the paper could be introduction, description of the problem/situation, perhaps background of the problem or situation, proposed or implemented solution, evaluation or critical analysis of the solution, need for further exploration, conclusion, but the chapters in your paper depend on the student and the project.

Project Defense (80 points) The student must have a face to face or telephonic discussion with the professor. The purpose of this is to guarantee that the paper's author is the person receiving a grade.

APA Style Thread

APA style is the accepted editorial style approved by the American Psychological Association. Basically, APA style is a means of correctly referencing and citing work within a written document. To help you correctly use APA style in your work for this course, you should visit the “Sample APA Reference Page” provided by the Academic Support Center at Park University (http://www.park.edu/support/citeapa.asp).

Proctor Qualification Thread

For this class, you must defend your project face to face or telephonically. The proctor's role is simply to identify you for the professor. For example, the proctor will say, "I am Captain Jones and I have standing before me Officer Smith. I can verify that he has been working on a project in this department for the last eight weeks because he has talked with me about it several times." If defense is face to face, you do not need a proctor.

Park University site administrators or adjunct faculty are preferred. Appropriate proctors may also include any college or university faculty member or administrator, K-12 school officials, military education officers, pastors, chaplains, senior personnel in your place of employment, US Embassy or Consular officers.

The following persons do not qualify as appropriate proctors: family members, neighbors, co-workers, friends, and immediate supervisors.

All students within the Kansas City metropolitan area should use a Park University proctor at the home campus or at one of our local sites – MetroPark Downtown or Independence. Any student within a two-hour drive of a Park University site should use a Park University proctor. A list of all Park University sites is located at: http//www.park.edu/dist/res.htm



Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Welcome to Senior Writing Project!  You will be working with other students and your professor but on your own project. I am here to facilitate and guide you, but you are responsible for your learning process.  Your classmates will enrich your experiences with this course.


THIS IS A UNIQUE COURSE FOR STUDENTS CURRENTLY WORKING IN A CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELD.  If you are not currently working in CJ, then you must complete an internship.  All Criminal Justice graduates from Park University will take CJ 450, Senior Seminar, and then either this course or CJ440, the internship.


You may design and propose a project in your working environment; design, implement and evaluate a project; or analyze and critique an existing project. Primarily you will be working on your project and discussing it with your professor and classmates.  Occasionally you will write up a part of your project and place this is the dropbox for evaluation and comment by the professor. 


The course does not have a text and does not have weekly assignments.  You are expected to have meaningful discussions with your classmates and professor and to work on your project. You should spend at least 135 hours on this course. 


I will work to stimulate your interest and learning; however, you will be expected to display initiative and a program of self-study as well.


 



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using more than 10 sources Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using eight to ten sources Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using more than six to eight sources (e.g. no evidence of operationally defined competency) No evidence supporting the problem/situation in the work environment 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Using many  (more that 10) sources of academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs at least five possible corrective solution(s) to the identified problem Using some (eight to ten) academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs five possible corrective solutions to the identified problem Using six to eight academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs less than five corrective solutions to the identified problem. Use of no or appropriate academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations).  Constructs no solutions for the identified problem. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2, 3, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Compare and contrast more than 10 sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution Compare and contrast 10 sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution Compare and contrast less than 10  sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution No solution proposed 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Implement the solution and report the results for two weeks or provide clear evidence of submission of  the proposal to the appropriate persons in the work environment Implement the solution  or submit the proposal to the appropriate persons in the work environment Solution proposed but no evidence of implementation or submission of proposal No evidence of proposal 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 10 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 5 - 9 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 3 - 4 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies less than 3 concepts relating to the solution 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
No errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting No more than 5 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting No more than 10 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting Contains more than 10 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting 
First Literacy (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
Community and Civic Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project by discussing more than five issues Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project five issues Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project by discussing less than five issues No demonstrated evidence of an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project 
Second Literacy (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
Ethics and Values                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Analyzes more than five ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project Analyses three to five  ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project Analyzes three to five ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project No demonstrated acquisition of tools for analyzing ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senor Writing Project 

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Last Updated:8/29/2006 8:20:19 AM