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EN 325 Modern Grammar
Glauner, Jeff


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EN 325 Modern Grammar

Semester

F2T 2006 DL

Faculty

Glauner, Jeff

Title

Professor of English (Retired)

Degrees/Certificates

Professor of English

Daytime Phone

816-584-6352

E-Mail

jeff.glauner@park.edu

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/jglauner/

Semester Dates

F2T 2006

Class Days

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
( EDU 325) This course concentrates on modern approaches to English grammar and its teaching after a brief historical perspective of transformational, structural, and traditional methodologies. 3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with three movements in grammatical study: traditional, structural, and generative-transformational through daily exercises, individually and in peer groups, and through formal testing (MoSTEP 1.1).
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the language for contemporary grammatical study and in the recognition and manipulation of grammatical structures. Proficiency will be demonstrated through regular completion of assignments from the text, through class discussions, and through formal examinations (MoSTEP 1.1).
  3. Investigate an issue related to the study of grammar, demonstrating scholarly skills of research, synthesis and analysis (MoSTEP 1.1, 1.2.7).
  4. For students who plan to earn their English/Language Arts teacher certification, the following MoSTEP Standards guide this course:
  5. - The preservice teacher will demonstrate a knowledge of and/or competency in the following areas: (MoSTEP 1.1, 1.2.1, 1.2.7)
  6. - Using standard spoken and written English (CA 1; NCTE 2.4; CR 1)
  7. - Identifying diversity in language use and dialects (CA 7; G 1.10; 4/2-4.3; NCTE 2.1.4-3.2.5; CR 2-4)
  8. - Understanding the history and the dynamic nature of the English language (CA 7; G 1.9; NCTE 2.1.2; CR 2)


Core Assessment:

EN/ED 325:  Modern Grammar
Term Project
Formal Essay (min of 2000 words) and Oral Presentation (10 minutes)

Purpose and Content

The purpose of this assignment is to allow you to become more aware of and to contribute to the body of scholarly dialogue on the topic of grammar—its history, theory, and practice.  The essay prompt is intentionally broad to allow both education and non-education majors flexibility in investigating an issue of most relevance to their current and future interests/pursuits.  With that said, however, education majors will be asked to investigate as their issue a pedagogical approach (past or present) to the teaching of grammar.  Each student must contextualize his/her topic within the appropriate history relating to language study/grammatical instruction.

The investigative essay will contain an analysis of the scholarly research (from professional, peer-reviewed journals) collected on the topic and will also include the writer's own response to the research.  This response should move beyond simple agreement or disagreement with the ideas presented to provide the writer's extension, complication, or application of the ideas.  For education majors, this response will take the form of a narrative description of an activity devised to teach a particular grammatical concept to a particular grade level—this narrative should be no longer than 1000 words.

In terms of the core learning outcomes for this class, the formal essay/presentation assignment responds to:

Outcome #2:  Students will demonstrate proficiency in the use of the language for contemporary grammatical study and in the recognition and manipulation of grammatical structures (MoSTEP 1.1).

Outcome #3:  Students will investigate an issue related to the study of grammar, demonstrating scholarly research, synthesis and analysis skills (MoSTEP 1.1, 1.2.7).

Outcome #4:  For students who plan to earn their English/Language Arts teacher certification, the following MoSTEP Standards guide this course:  The preservice teacher will demonstrate a knowledge of and/or competency in the following areas (MoSTEP 1.1, 1.2.1, 1.2.7):

  • Using standard spoken and written English (CA 1; NCTE 2.4; CR 1)
  • Identifying diversity in language use and dialects (CA 7; G 1.10; 4/2-4.3; NCTE 2.1.4-3.2.5; CR 2-4)
  • Understanding the history and the dynamic nature of the English language (CA 7; G 1.9; NCTE 2.1.2; CR 2) 

Audience

Your targeted audience should be individuals interested in teaching, in learning more about grammar (and/or socio/linguistics to a limited degree), its history, theory, practice—in other words, a college-level audience, professionals. You will need to organize your material clearly both in the written and oral versions (10 minutes) so classmates can take notes easily for discussion and examination purposes. Copies of your papers for classmates will be provided for download through our eCompanion shell.

Requirements

In composing your draft, you will want to use the literary present tense and avoid the use of the first person pronouns (I, we). This assignment is intended to give you practice writing formal analysis of scholarly material, and it needs to be presented in a formal format and with a formal tone.  Your project will adhere to either MLA or APA for overall format, in-text citations, and bibliography.  Consult your Everyday Writer and ask questions if any of these items are not clear, or if you are unsure about other documentation requirements not specifically mentioned.   

Assessment

Term projects are assessed upon the following four factors:

1)  Focus: The content must reflect a specific focus on a carefully narrowed topic and issue (determined in consultation with instructors).

2)  Development/Analysis: The content must reflect a strong understanding of and response the issue under examination, including representation of multiple perspectives.

3)  Coherence: The project must be ordered in such a way that the reader can follow the coherence of the project's intent from point to point and start to finish.

4)  Mechanics: The project must reflect the writer's mastery of the conventions of standard written English and the conventions of scholarly research and writing, including careful documentation of ideas, paraphrases, and direct quotations from outside sources.

In general terms, significant weakness in any one of these areas reduces the value of a project by a letter grade. However, serious weakness in one area can lead to the loss of two or three letter grades or to a failing grade.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Each student is responsible for:
a) completing weekly reading assignments;
b) completing weekly discussionhomework activities;
c) completing responses to classmates' research paper and/or teaching package first drafts and other posts as required;
d) completing an unproctored midterm examination;
e) completing a proctored final examination.

A computerized examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

Other information on proctored exams:

  • It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
  • Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.
  • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.
  • Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.  

Grading:

A computerized examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

Other Information on proctored exams:

  • It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
  • Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.
  • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.
  • Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.  

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week Readings Assignments Due
One Glauner, Chap. 1-4 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; complete un-graded "initial assessment".
Two Glauner, Chap. 5-8 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; post term project ideas in "Term Project Discussion" thread.
Three Glauner, Chap. 9-12 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; complete mid-term preparation quiz.
Four Glauner, Chap. 13-14 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; complete mid-term examination.
Five Glauner, Chap. 15-16 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; submit first draft of term project; complete peer response activity.  Proctor arrangements are due this week.
Six Glauner, Chap. 17-18 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; continue working on term project.
Seven Glauner, Chap. 19-20 Participate in Discussion and Homework threads; post questions to "Final Exam Discussion" thread; submit final draft of term project.
Eight n/a Participate in Discussion threads; complete final examination in-person with approved proctor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Tips for Success:


Based on my experience as both a student and teacher of grammar, here are my top five tips for success in EN/EDU 325:



  • Read and Re-Read:  The readings of this course are not intended to be difficult; but because of the enormous scope of grammatical study and the short time we have to explore it, the coursework is intense, requiring your complete attention and a great deal of rereading and reconsidering. The textbook is brief, but every word is there for a purpose. Every example is worth considering carefully. It is also cumulative. If you don't understand one chapter, the next chapter will be much more difficult to understand. 

  • Ask Questions:  Don't hesitate to ask questions in the Office area of our course or, if you would prefer, via email to your instructor.  Since the course is cumulative, it is critical that you diligently pursue a complete understanding of each concept.  Don't be afraid to ask any question!  In each week's discussion, you'll also have opportunities to work with each other--peer learning/teaching is usually the most rewarding component of an online course, especially this one. 

  • Identify Online Resources:  Although our emphasis in this course will be on function (how a grammatical constituent functions in the context of a given sentence), it is helpful to have a good dictionary handy, as sometimes a form definition is a good place to start.  My online dictionary of choice is Merriam-Webster, http://www.m-w.com/.  Also, a good online language handbook will provide definitions as a starting point.  Some of my favorites include The Guide to Grammar and Writing, http://webster.comment.edu/grammar/ and Daniel Kies' textbook Modern English Grammar, http://papyr.com/hypertextbooks/engl_126/books126.htm.

  • Login and Participate Regularly:  Some online students simply login once or twice during the week...to post their initial responses and to respond to peers.  A better approach is to login each day or every other day to monitor (not necessarily respond to) the online discussions.  That way, you aren't trying to absorb all of the postings in one or two sittings.  I recommend going into the online course on Monday or Tuesday and trying to ask any questions you have about the readings before your online discussion posting is due.  You can post questions in the discussion area; in our virtual office (under Course Home); or via private email to your instructor

Expect responses from your instructor submitted by email or on the threads within 48 hours.  Expect responses to major assignment submissions (e.g., a draft of your research project) within a week after the week it is due.  You should check your email and the various course threads at least every two or three days and you should check the gradebook once each week.  Grading for each week is normally completed by Wednesday of the following week.



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
3, 4a, 4b                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Discussion of topic presents and expresses the relationship among viewpoints from multiple and diverse perspectives Discussion of topic presents viewpoints from multiple and diverse perspectives Discussion of the topic presents only one perspective (or only the binary—pro/con—perspectives) or presents viewpoints from non-scholarly resources Discussion of the topic does not present any perspectives from scholarly research 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The writer makes clear, sophisticated, and persuasive links between research presented and thesis The writer clearly relates research presented to thesis The relationship of the research to the thesis is unclear or inconsistent The writer does not relate the research presented to the thesis 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
3, 4a, 4b                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
The paper presents a sophisticated and compelling thesis in response to the scholarly conversation taking place about the topic The paper presents a clear and arguable thesis in response to the scholarly conversation taking place about the topic The thesis presented simply restates a viewpoint expressed in the research There is no thesis statement (overall argument about the topic) present 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Paper demonstrates sophisticated use (understanding) of grammatical/linguistic terminology in presentation of thesis and support Paper accurately appropriates grammatical/linguistic terminology in presentation of thesis and support Paper does not accurately incorporate grammatical/linguistic terminology Paper does not incorporate grammatical/linguistic terminology 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Paper demonstrates a thorough and sophisticated investigation of an issue related to the study of grammar, demonstrating scholarly research, synthesis and analysis skills Paper investigates an issue related to the study of grammar, demonstrating scholarly research, synthesis and analysis skills Paper reflects only a surface investigation of an issue related to the study of grammar and/or does not demonstrate scholarly research, synthesis and analysis skills Paper does not investigate an issue related to the study of grammar and/or demonstrate scholarly research, synthesis and analysis skills 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2,3,4a, 4b                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Writer contextualizes argument within the broader field of language study (linguistics, socio-linguistics, or education) Writer contextualizes argument within the broader field of language study (linguistics, socio-linguistics, or education) Writer minimally or inaccurately contextualizes argument within the broader field of language study (linguistics, socio-linguistics, or education) Writer does not contextualize argument within the broader field of language study (linguistics, socio-linguistics, or education) 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
3, 4a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Content displays consistent facility in the use of standard edited English, demonstrating variety in sentence structure and range of vocabulary

 
Content conforms to standard edited English with a minimum of grammar or mechanical errors Frequent/distracting errors in grammar and mechanics Errors in grammar and mechanics are so severe as to obscure meaning 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Paper format and documentation of sources reflect mastery of MLA or APA conventions Writer accurately uses MLA or APA format to document ideas, paraphrases, and direct quotations from outside sources Paper contains errors in in-text or end-text citations, including missing citations for ideas, paraphrases, and direct quotations from outside sources Writer does not utilize MLA or APA to document sources 
M/LL Courses                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
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Last Updated:10/11/2006 10:44:39 AM