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CJ 232 Introduction to Corrections
Getty, Carol P.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 232 Introduction to Corrections

Semester

FA 2006 HO

Faculty

Getty, Carol P.

Title

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Department Chair

Degrees/Certificates

PhD, University of Missouri - Kansas City
MS, University of Arizona
BA, Wellesley College

Office Location

Mackay 20 B

Office Hours

T and R: 8:30 - 10; Wed: 8 - 11; before and after class; by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6336

E-Mail

carol.getty@park.edu

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu

Semester Dates

August 15 - December 15, 2006

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

1:00 - 2:15 PM

Prerequisites

None

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Corrections, An Introduction, Richard P. Seiter, Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2005

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
This basic course discusses correctional concepts from their historical background to the present. An emphasis will be placed on the multi-faceted approach to corrections in our society, including the use of alternatives to incarceration. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
My educational philosophy is one of intractiveness based on lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogoues, examinations, Internet research, video viewing, and writing.  I encourage each learner to participate and to engage in lively exploration of ideas, issues, and contradiction.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Employ the vocabulary in corrections and learn to gather, evaluate, and communicate information about the subject effectively.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the American correctional system, its history, its evolution to the present and the future.
  3. Discuss the increasing role of private entities support the public system.
  4. Compare the American system to systems in other nations.
  5. Apply sensitivity to value questions in corrections and understand current issues and be able to communicate various positions on these issues.


Core Assessment:




  • Class participation, quizzes & exams




  • Class participation, quizzes & exams




  • Class participation 


  • Papers, presentations, group &/or individual activities with written assignments (see CJ205)

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Classes will consist of lecture, class discussions, and group projects. Also planned for this course: a field trip to jail/prison, at least one guest lecturer.   Students are expected to participate in class and to present information and research.

Papers:  You must write 15 responses of at least one page, using the text and an additional source and answering one of the questions at the end of the chapter.  (Your choice.)  Citations are necessary. These papers are due on the day the chapter is being discussed.  If the chapter is listed for discussion two days, then the short response is due the second day. In order to gain complete points (20 per paper) you must present your response, without reading it, when called upon. (Most students will be called upon.) Late papers will loose 5 points per class day of lateness.

Participation is expected.  If you are not present, you can't participate.

Grading:

                                                                                          By percent         By points             

Two tests (10% each) and a comprehensive final             30%                   300

Class participation                                                             20%                    200

Experimental project summary or book review                 15%                    150

15 written responses to chapter questions                      30%                     300   

                                                                 TOTAL              100%                     1000

In computing grades, the following scale will ordinarily be used, although I reserve the right to make adjustments: A = 90 -–100%, B = 80 – 89%, C = 70 – 79%, D = 60 – 69%, F = less than 60%.  In determining grades, major factors to be considered include whether the assignment was completely correctly in a timely manner.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Certain work may be made up in cases of legitimate absence.  Legitimate absences include student illness, death in the immediate family, and approved activities where students represent the college.  I have the right to make the final decision on what absences are legitimate and when make-ups will be allowed or given.  Generally, tests will not be given after the class has taken them.  Once the test has been returned to the class, no student can take the test for a grade.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Reading:  The entire text will be read for the class.  Assignments are indicated on the schedule below.  Reading of a chapter in the text is required for almost every class. Students are expected to read the material before coming to class.

Lecture:  Students may ask questions anytime during lectures.

Tests: There will be two tests. Additionally, there is a comprehensive final examination.  Tests will be both objective and subjective. No test will be given after graded tests have been returned to the class.

Exercises:  A five-minute written exercise will be part of many classes.  These exercises will be announced and unannounced.  Since they are for my benefit as well as yours, they may sometimes be collected and recorded.

PARTICIPATION IS EXPECTED. Promptness is expected

Papers:  Papers should be computer generated and be in proper format, including citations and bibliography. For possible full credit, these must be submitted on or before the due date.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS: The instructor may amend this schedule based on the progress of the course and the needs of the students.

Aug. 15 and 17 Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2

Aug. 22 and 24 Chapters 2 and 3

Aug. 29 and 31 Chapters 3 and 4

Sept. 05 and 07 Chapters 4 and 5

Sept. 12 and 14 Chapters 5 and 6

Sept. 19 and 21 Test 1 and Chapter 7

Sept. 26 and 8 Chapters 7 and 8

Oct. 03 and 05 Chapters 8 and 9

Oct. 10 and 12 Chapter 10

Oct. 14 to 22 Fall Break

Oct. 24 and 26 Chapter 11

Oct. 31 and 02 Chapter 12

Nov. 07 and 09 Chapter 13

Nov. 14 and 16 Chapter 14

Nov. 21 and 23 Test 2 and Thanksgiving Recess

Nov. 28 and 30 Chapter 15

Dec. 05 and 07 Chapter 16

Dec. 12, 1 - 3pm FINAL

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90
My Attendance Policy:  In order to do well in this course, students should attend class.  Material presented in class lectures and in discussions can be gained in no other way. If you must be absent, please inform me before class by calling my office.  Classes missed for legitimate reasons are excusable only by prior approval.  This means that excuses for athletic events must be given before class.  Students are responsible for making up any work missed and for turning in any assignments before the missed class. Five points will be deducted from class participation for every class missed.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

 


HOME CONFINEMENT PROJECT


 


One of the best ways to learn is through experience.  Reading about corections cannot begin to effectively communicate the personal impact of correctional policies and practices on those who are incarcerated. Because I cannot arrange for an overnight or week end stay in a correctional facility for students in this class, this home confinement assignment is designed to stimulate some aspects of being incarcerated


 


This project counts for 30% of your grade. It consists of three parts, one of which is the writing of a paper.


 


Part I (10%),  Confinement:


Confine yourself to your home, apartment, or dormitory from 7 pm Friday to 7 pm Sunday (or any other consecutive 48-hour period).  NOTIFY ME OF THE DATES OF YOUR CONFINEMENT BEFORE YOU BEGIN.  During this time the following restrictions will be followed:



  • No watching TV or using a computer, CD, or stereo

  • No use of any weight-lifting, exercise equipment, or recreational games

  • Only 3 twenty-minute trips to the kitchen/refrigerator per day at these times: #1 -= 8am. #2 = 12 noon, #3 = 5 pm.  No eating at any other times.

  • No use of anything from the medicine cabinet (e.g., aspirin) without prior approval (except for standard prescribed medication or a medical emergency)

  • Except of  1 five-minute phone call per day, no verbal or physical contact with anyone from outside who does not live in the facility

  • Only 4 verbal communications per day with anyone living inside the facility with each conversation limited to 5 minutes ( all other communication must be in writing)

  • No closing the bathroom door at any time, and no baths (only one 2-minute shower per day)

  • No jewelry (other than a watch) or make-up; outer clothes are limited to jeans and a T-shirt

  • Additional or other restrictions may be added by me prior to your confinement

 


If at any point,  this experience becomes physically or psychologically overwhelming for you, terminate the assignment immediately. Record this in your hourly log and explain.  Consult with me about an extension  of the book alternative.


 


Part 2 (10%), Read a Book


Read a book written by an inmate or inmates about experiences behind bars.  I will give you a list of approved books.  You chosen book may be written before, during, or after your confinement.


 


After reading your book and completing the home confinement experiment, you will write a paper.


 


Part 3 (10%): Paper


 


The paper should contain:


 


COVER PAGE: Course number and title, your name, and the following statement which must be submitted on the cover age, typed as follows:


 


            I verify that I personally conducted the assignment reported herein, and that this paper is


an accurate reflection of my findings.  I understand that falsifying or fabricating information is fraud.  I understand that misrepresenting another person's material as my own is plagiarism.  I further realize that wither fraud or plagiarism will result in failing this class, and subsequently can lead to formal charges and dismissal from the university.  Moreover, I verify that this paper was developed on the basis of my experiences during home confinement and was written exclusively for the class by: ______________________ (Student's signature)


 


(20) points)


Section 1: HOURLY LOG AND PERSONAL REACTIONS 


            Documentation of the precise dates and times of confinement, detailed accounts of exactly what you actually did during each of the 48 hours confines, and how you were feeling as each hour passed.


 


(15 points)


Section 2: COMPLIANCE WITH RULES


            How easy or difficult you found it was to comply with each of the require regulations, whether you broke any of the rules, etc.  If you broke rules, explain why.


 


(30 points)


Section 3: INMATE COMPARISON


            Using material from the book you selected, (with all citations properly referenced by page number), compare your home confinement experience with that of the inmate author of the book you selected.  In what ways was your experience similar?  In what ways did it differ from really being behind bars.


 


(20 points)


Section 4: PERSONAL REFLECTIONS


            Possible ideas: Your views about the nature of confinement as a punishment technique.  What you initially thought the experiment would be like prior to actually participating in it, and whether those perceptions remained the same. Insights into how the experience affected you, how you felt at various points as you progressed through it, whether it changed your thinking in any way.


 


Section 5: BIBLIOGRAPHY:


            Citation of the book used in the comparison


 


(15 points)


MECHANICS


            Proper punctuation, grammar, spelling, organization, writing style, etc.


 


This material was adopted given to me by Dr. Janet Stichcomb, PhD, Associate Professor at Florida Atlantic University after I hear her presentation at a national criminal justice conference and after discussion with her.


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
2,4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Evaluates the characteristics of the following five aspects of the American incarceration system (history, structure, inmate treatment, correctional policies, and consequences of incarceration).  At least two characteristics for each aspect must be included. Evaluates the characteristics of the following five aspects of the American incarceration system (history, structure, inmate treatment, correctional policies, and consequences of incarceration).  At least one characteristic for each aspect must be included. Evaluates the characteristics of the following five aspects of the American incarceration system (history, structure, inmate treatment, correctional policies, and consequences of incarceration).  No characteristics for each aspect are included. (e.g. no evidence of operationally defined competency) Fails to provide evidence of judgment about incarceration 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Using personal home confinement experience and/or inmate writings, constructs explanations for the five aspects of the  American incarceration system over time, for both state and federal systems Using personal home confinement experience and/or inmate writings, constructs explanations for the five aspects of the  American incarceration system for either the federal or state systems Using personal home confinement experience and inmate writings, constructs explanations for less than five aspects of the  American incarceration  system Failed to participate in the home confinement project (project and/or books) and failed to produce assigned paper 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Compares and contrasts the similarities and differences between the personal experience and that of inmate author(s) using all five aspects Compares and contrasts the similarities and differences between the personal experience and that of inmate author(s) using some (three to four) of the five aspects Compares and contrasts the similarities and differences between the personal experience and that of inmate author(s) one or two aspects Fails to follow directions and or fails to complete the project as assigned. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Demonstrates in writing an understanding of many (at least five)  aspects of America's current incarceration policies Demonstrates in writing an understand of some (three to four) aspects of America's current incarceration policies Demonstrates in writing little understanding of the consequences of America's current incarceration policies by discussing one or two aspects of the incarceration policies. Fails to demonstrate any understanding of the consequences of America's incarceration policies 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Using terminology from the course and research correctly, identifies more than 10 concepts about incarceration in the paper Using terminology from the course and research correctly, identifies ten concepts about incarceration in the paper Using terminology from the course and research correctly, identifies less than ten concepts about incarceration in the paper Using terminology from the course and research incorrectly and fails to identity  concepts about incarceration in the paper 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Paper contains no errors on the following items: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting. Paper contains one to five errors on the following items: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting. Paper contains from six to ten errors on the following items: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting. Paper contains numerous errors (more than 10) on the following items: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting. 
First Literacy (or Disciplinary Competency) Community and Civic Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
Community and Civic Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of the American correctional  system using social, political, and economic concerns Demonstrates an understanding of complexity of the American justice system using two of the concerns (social, political, economic) Demonstrates an understanding of complexity of the American justice system using only a single concern (social, political, economic) No demonstrated evidence of an understanding of the complexity of the American justice system 
Second Literacy  (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
Ethics and Values                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Demonstrates an understanding of more than  five ethics and value questions relating to the American correctional system Demonstrates an understanding of three to  five ethics and value questions relating to the American correctional system Demonstrates little  understanding of ethics and value questions relating to the American correctional system by discussing only one to three of these No demonstrated acquisition of tools for analyzing ethics and value questions relating to the American correctional system 

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Last Updated:8/7/2006 1:59:25 PM