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ED 630 Action Practicum
Wilson, Catherine


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

Course

ED 630 Action Practicum

Semester

F1P 2006 EDI

Faculty

Wilson, Catherine

Title

Associate Professor of Education, Retired/Adjunct

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D.

E-Mail

catherine.wilson@park.edu

Semester Dates

August 22-October 10, 2006

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Prerequisites

ED 629

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Roberts-Holmes, Guy.  (2005)  Doing Your Early Years Research Project : A Step by Step Guide.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
One of two concluding courses in the Master of Education designed to complete the praxis model. This is the action/application of information learned in the program. Each student will develop and apply an educational plan utilizing new learning. The project must be related to the emphasis area. Prerequisites: 15 hours in the program including ED 629.
a. general studies
b. school law
c. multi-cultural
d. teaching at-risk students
e. early childhood
f. adult education
3 cr.

Educational Philosophy:

Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism. 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply the theories and practices learned in the program to an actual classroom or educational situation. [1.2.1 - 1.2.11]
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the current teaching situation and will identify areas that need improvement. [1.2.1 - 1.2.11]
  3. Develop and implement an action plan to meet the need for improvement. [1.2.1 - 1.2.11]
  4. Demonstrate the ability to identify pressing needs in the school environment, research information using educational and psychological sources, synthesize the information, apply it to a practical situation, and evaluate the success or failure of the effort. [1.2.1, 1.2.8]
  5. Demonstrate understanding of educational principles, ability to assess needs, sensitivity to student preferences and diversity, and the ability to implement sound educational practice. [1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2..8, 1.2.9]
  6. The student will demonstrate the ability to be an independent, life-long learner. [1.2.9]


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. See Additional Information for NAEYC Standards and Professional Tools
Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:

Participation - Student attendance and participation is essential in achieving maximum learning.  It is generally expected that students will attend all scheduled class sessions and contribute to the classroom learning environment (e.g. constructive peer reviews).  

Project - Each student will complete the action/teacher research project they developed in ED 629.  It should include:  an introduction, review of literature, methodology, results, and conclusions and implications. 

 I.         Define the Problem

Ø      State a well-defined problem.

Ø      Identify possible solutions, again using current appropriate research.

Ø      Identify your solution and why you decided on your particular approach.

 

II.        Review of Literature  

Ø      Include current and appropriate research in review. 

Ø      Literature review should include multi-disciplinary perspectives when appropriate

Ø      The project needs to be related to current best practice research.

 

III.      Methodology

Ø      Action Research design should be sound and relevant.

Ø      Data collection techniques should be workable and design should include a triangulation of data sources.

Ø      Hypothesis should be testable when included.

 

IV.     Results 

Ø      Themes or categories emerging from the data should be presented, analyzed, and discussed. (See Chapter 10 of course text for further details)

 V.      Conclusions and Implications        

Ø      Tentative conclusions are explained and evaluated, that is, what kinds of understandings did your action research project provide?  Are these understandings of value?  If so, how and why?  How will these understandings improve the quality of learning opportunities or interactions in the classroom?  Who might benefit and why?

Ø      Methods of gathering information in your action research project are evaluated.

Ø      Relationships with research participants are appraised.

Ø      Contributions to existing knowledge are explained.

Ø      Questions unanswered or emerging new questions are identified.

 

 

Grading:

Written Project (100 pts.)

Scale

90 - 100 – A

80 – 89 – B

70 – 79 – C

60 – 69 – D

0 – 59 – F

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Work must be turned in on time to receive full credit.

 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Please reserve Tuesday evening for this class meeting, and arrange your day so that you are able to arrive at 5:00pm and remain until 9:30pm.  We will begin class promptly at 5:00pm, take breaks to keep our minds fresh and engaged, and plan for a variety of learning opportunities, including small group research work and large group conversations. 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

The following is a tentative weekly schedule of classroom activities.  Please note that the schedule may be modified to achieve to maximize learning opportunities.  If appropriate, individual meetings/ communications with students will held during weeks three through seven in lieu of one of the formal class meeting.

Week One-Two (August 22 and 29)

Ø      Discussion, question/answers concerning methods of gathering information

Ø      Research peer group work and individual meeting/communications with instructor

Week Three-Six (September 5, 12, and 19)

Ø      Weekly 'Progress Reports'

Ø      Qualitative data analysis practice

Ø      Research peer group work and individual meeting/communications with instructor

Week – Six -Seven September 26 and October 3)

Ø      Chapter 4 "Results" due for peer review

Ø      Peer review concerning conclusions and implications

Ø      Final instructor review with suggestions for implications

Week Eight (October 10)

Ø      Final project due

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Graduate Catalog Page 23-24

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct. Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2006-2007 Graduate Catalog Page 23-24


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, in a 16-week semester (or 2, in an 8-week term) will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Dean, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2006-2007 Graduate Catalog Page 27
Only one absence will be excused in the 8-week graduate sessions.  More than one absence, and late arrivals or departures will influence your final evaluation.  

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

NAEYC Standards and Professional Tools:


 


Demonstrate the ability to be an independent, life-long learner. [1.2.9] (NAEYC Standards 5  Professional Tools 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 )


 


Apply the theories and practices learned in the program to an actual classroom or educational situation. [1.2.1 - 1.2.11] (NAEYC Standard 5  Professional Tools 4,5,6 )


 


Demonstrate an understanding of the current teaching situation and will identify areas that need improvement. [1.2.1 - 1.2.11]  (NAEYC Standards 5  Professional Tools 5,6,7,8,9 )


 


Develop the ability to identify pressing needs in the school environment, research information using educational and psychological sources, synthesize the information, apply it to a practical situation, and evaluate the success or failure of the effort. [1.2.1, 1.2.8] (NAEYC Standards 5  Professional Tools 5,6,7,8,9 )


 


Demonstrate understanding of educational principles, ability to assess needs, sensitivity to student preferences and diversity, and the ability to implement sound educational practice. [1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2..8, 1.2.9] (NAEYC Standards 5  Professional Tools 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,9 )

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:7/24/2006 2:31:23 PM