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CJ 441 Senior Writing Project
Plumb, Greg


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 441 Senior Writing Project

Semester

S1T 2007 DL

Faculty

Plumb, Greg

Title

Professor of Criminal Justice

Degrees/Certificates

B.A. History & Economics, University of Missouri-Columbia 1973
J.D. University of Missouri-Columbia 1975

Office Location

Mabee 226

Office Hours

Wednesdays 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Daytime Phone

(816) 584-6506

E-Mail

greg.plumb@park.edu

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/gregplumb

Semester Dates

January 15 - March 11, 2007

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

There is no approved text for this course.  There is, however, a great deal of literature available that will provide guidance in completing your project. Previous program evaluations should offer suggestions in terms of how to approach, gather data, and evaluate a particular project. Of course, I am available for any particular resource issues that each student may confront. The additional resources list provided with the syllabus includes online full-text sources.

Additional Resources:

Some resources you might find helpful:

Books:

Bloom, Michael F. (2002). The Infinite Organization: Celebrating the Positive Use of Power in Organizations. Mountain View, CA: Davies-Black.

Church, Allan H., Waclawski, Janine, and Kraut, Allen I. (2001). Designing and Using Organizational Surveys: A seven step process. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Holman, Peggy., Decane, Tom, and Cady, Steven. (2006). The Change Handbook: The Definitive Resource on Today's Best Methods for Engaging Whole Systems. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler.

Kerley, Kent R., and Dantzker, M.L. (2004). Policing and program evaluation. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. (ISBN 0-13-039473-4)

Web links

Professor Plumb's website http://captain.park.edu/gregplumb

International Association of Chiefs of Police
http://www.iacp.org/

Organizational Development Network http://www.odnetwork.org/

American Justice Institute http://www.americanjusticeinstitute.com/

Basic Guide to Program Evaluation. http://www.managementhelp.org/evaluatn/fnl_eval.htm

Annotated bibliography resources: 

www.bothell.washington.edu/library/guides/annotations.html 

http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/AnnotatedBibliography.html

Journals

Camp, Scott D. and Lambert, Eric G. (2006). The Influence of organizational incentives on absenteeism: Sick-leave use among correctional workers. Criminal Justice Policy Review, 17 (2), 144-172.

Chermak, Steven; Weiss, Alexander. (2006). Community Policing in the News Media. Police Quarterly, 9 (2), 135-160.

Durfee, Jessica L. (2006). Social change and status quo; framing effects on risk perception: An Exploratory Experiment. Science Communication, 27 (4), 459-495.

Owen, Stephen S. (2006). Occupational Stress Among Correctional Supervisors. The Prison Journal, 86 (2), 164-181.

Sklansky, David Alan. (2006). Not your father's police department: making sense of the new demographics of law enforcement. Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, 96 (3), 1209-1243.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
This capstone course may be taken instead of CJ 440, Internship in Criminal Justice. It is designed for students currently employed in a criminal justice field who do not need the practical experience of an internship. Students in this course must design, implement, evaluate, analyze, and/or critique a project connected to their work environment in written format. This course may be taken online or an independent study in a face to face setting. The student's advisor or the department chair must approve students to substitute this course for the internship. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

Professor Plumb's educational philosophy is based on using a variety of methods in learning, focusing on the interactive.  In the online learning environment, the concentration is on class discussion (both initial postings and responses to classmates), written assignments, and a major applied project paper.  Students will be required to analyze, criticize, and synthesize information learned and apply this information in the examination of case studies.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and analyze different approaches to a problem/situation in your work environment
  2. Design a possible correction solution to the problem/situation
  3. Apply the corrective solution or offer it to your organization as a possible solution
  4. Design an annotated bibliography with at least 10 sources
  5. Defend the senior writing project face-to-face or telephonically to the instructor


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Decide on the specific research goals.
  2. Justify reasons for selecting project variables.
  3. Adapt evaluative methodology in case studies as a potential project model.
Core Assessment:

Students in this course must identify a problem/situation in their work environment which could be improved, research possible solutions to the identified problem/situation., evaluate these, propose a solution based on their work environment, implement the solution or propose the solution to appropriate person(s).  Students must write a 20 page paper explaining their project.

Link to Class Rubric

Grading:

Student evaluation will be based on individual performance on examinations, written reports, and class participation. There are 400 total points for this course and the accumulated sum will determine the final grade based on the following scale.

            Participation in threaded discussion .........100 points

            Annotated bibliography............................ 50 points

            Essays (2 @ 25 points each).................... 50 points 

            Paper...................................................... 200 points

            (Structure 50 points; Evidence 50 points; Analysis 50 points, and Mechanics 50 points.)

            A = 360-400; B = 320-359; C=280-319; D=240-279; F= <240

 Grades for papers will be based on specific criteria, the project, structure, evidence, analysis and mechanics. These criteria have standards for evaluation upon which a grade will be assessed.

 “A” grade (180 - 200 points)

The highest quality or “A” paper is one in which the performance of these criteria are truly outstanding in every aspect. The structure is unchallengeable with appropriate evidence for each major point and analyzed in a scholarly manner. In addition, contrary arguments are included in the discussion of major points or conclusions. Poor grammar or mechanics have no place in an “A” paper.

 “B” grade (160 - 179 points)

The next level is a paper that appears to be excellent in quality to which a grade of “B” is assessed. This grade is based on meeting all of the specific criteria, but not at the outstanding level. The structure may not be fully outlined and only some supporting evidence and the resultant analysis exhibit some inconsistencies. Ignoring or failing to identify major objections For example, an interviewed source makes an assertion but not fully verified or documented. Mechanically, there are some spelling, grammar and punctuation errors.

 “C” grade (140 - 159 points)

The average or “C” paper is one that only meets the assessment criteria. The structure may be identified but not fully explained or outlined. Supporting evidence only “noted” and not well integrated into the overall content. For example, citing an agency administrator for making a specific comment, but failing to verify whether it is a subject or objective analysis of the issue.    Spelling, grammar and punctuation errors detract from the overall presentation.

 “D” grade (120 - 139 points)

A “D” paper is one in which there is the lack of the assessment criteria. The author suggested points but failed to meet even the minimum of support. There were numerous mechanical errors that either indicate a lack of attention or knowledge. The quality of this paper fails to achieve even

 “F” grade (< 120 points)

F paper does not meet the minimum criteria for a “D” paper.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

I do not accept late assignments.  It important to maintain a predetermined pace to ensure academic goals will be achieved. Even though this course is asynchronous there must be a schedule as a guide. All activities are designed to allow and encourage everyone to complete the assignments in a timely manner so that we all progress together. Since we are all in the same boat we must each share in the responsibility to maintain momentum and direction toward our academic goals. As a matter of fairness once the assignments and examinations have been posted we must reduce or eliminate any potential for compromise. Therefore, make-up assignments and examinations are discouraged and will be available only for emergency reasons, appropriately documented. Further, the date due is the last but not the first. In other words tasks can be completed or accomplished at any time after being made available. It is a good idea to accomplish the task early so that personal events do not preclude a timely completion of the assignment.  

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week 1 (January 15-21, 2007)  Topic: Problem solving model

Week 2 (January 22-28, 2007)  Topic: Define the problem

Week 3 (January 29 - February 4, 2007)  Topic: Gather the facts

Week 4 (February 5-11, 2007)  Topic: Generate alternatives

Week 5 (February 12-18, 2007)  Topic: Analyze alternatives

Week 6 (February 19-25, 2007)  Topic: Select the most appropriate alternative(s)

Week 7 (February 26 - March 4, 2007)  Topic: Evaluate the decision

Week 8 (March 5-11, 2007)  
Topic: Evaluate the decision

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:


Extra credit


I do not give “extra credit” as a means of increasing a grade. Basically, I believe that more of he same does not make anything better which could result in increased reward. The course requirements and means of achieving a grade are clearly outlined in the syllabus. If one desires a specific grade it is a matter of relating performance to the standard for that grade.


Participation


Participation in all aspects of this course is viewed as an integral part of the overall learning process. This is an online course so interactivity is very important to mastering the content material. By the nature of this delivery system all of the course requirements must be accomplished in a manner that takes advantage of technology. Technology is not an end, rather, the means for accomplishing the learning objectives of this material. I place a great deal of importance of being involved in the interactive nature of this online education. The value of participating in the interactive aspects of this course is 25 percent of the overall grade. With such emphasis there are certain rules to get maximum credit. The major emphasis is placed on the quality and quantity of participation in threaded discussion questions.   These questions are designed to encourage discussion and debate on relevant issues related to the course material. A quality comment or contribution requires more than a simple one-line statement such as, “good point,” “well done,” “I agree/disagree,” etc. The quality of the contribution is evaluated based on taking a position on the question or comments of other students by either stating a reason for agreement/disagreement or expansion of their idea or statement. Quantity is based on at least two separate contributions to question or discussion and response to one colleague's essay, each week.


Policy for incompletes?


As a matter of personal preference I discourage incomplete grades. I understand that there are unique or special circumstances that make this option seem to be an acceptable solution. However, such a grade place an additional burden on students during their subsequent term of study. Having to focus on the requirements of last term as well as their current term could cause stress that will negatively impact performance on both. Assignment of and “I” may result in: (1) an expansion of the requirement; (2) an increase in performance standard; or (3) both 


Park University policy on incomplete grades is as follows: “An incomplete grade (I) may be issued only upon completion of a “Contract for Incomplete” signed by the student and the instructor and placed on file in the Office of the Registrar or Campus Center. An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for the course.. An “I” indicates that the course work was not completed in the time allotted in the semester/term through no fault of the student as determined by the instructor. Final assessment of the grade is postponed to no later than 60 days after the last day of the semester/term in which the “I” was received. Failure on the part of the student to complete the work will result in an “F.” A student may submit a written request for one 30-day extension beyond the60 days. After approval by the instructor, the request is filed in the Office of the Registrar or Campus Center. (page 94, 2006-2007 Park University Undergraduate Catalog


Progress


Normally a text book would be assigned to a course which provides for a proposed schedule or timetable. The nature of this course seems to be a bit inconsistent with that norm because of the individual nature of each project. Each student's goal is to write a paper concerning some program/policy in their organization or agency. Individual papers will necessarily be distinctly different in terms of what or how their evaluation or assessment is to be accomplished. However, there is a collaborative component to assist in each students progress. 


The weekly discussion thread involves discussing projects with colleagues. The feedback and “lessons learned” shared provide an outside view of projects which will result in mutual assistance. The writing project is a major undertaking requiring a great deal of research and compilation of data. For those reasons students will have to maintain a steady progression toward completion of the project.


It is deemed inconsistent with normal progression for a student to get 3 weeks behind colleagues. Therefore, the weekly section activities will only be open for 3 weeks, the last, current and next weeks only. What that means is that if a student were to get 3 week behind colleagues individual progress is significantly hindered to achieve a successful outcome. The collaborative and cooperative nature of this course must be maintained as it is in the best interest of all students.


 




Attachments:
Full text online resources

How to write a thesis statement

Problem solving model

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using more than 10 sources Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using eight to ten sources Judge and provide evidence of that judgment of a problem/situation in the student's work environment. Investigate the identified problem/situation using more than six to eight sources (e.g. no evidence of operationally defined competency) No evidence supporting the problem/situation in the work environment 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Using many  (more that 10) sources of academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs at least five possible corrective solution(s) to the identified problem Using some (eight to ten) academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs five possible corrective solutions to the identified problem Using six to eight academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations), constructs less than five corrective solutions to the identified problem. Use of no or appropriate academic (books, journals, etc) and practical evidence (interviews, observations).  Constructs no solutions for the identified problem. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2, 3, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Compare and contrast more than 10 sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution Compare and contrast 10 sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution Compare and contrast less than 10  sources of corrective data and write a proposal to implement a solution No solution proposed 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Implement the solution and report the results for two weeks or provide clear evidence of submission of  the proposal to the appropriate persons in the work environment Implement the solution  or submit the proposal to the appropriate persons in the work environment Solution proposed but no evidence of implementation or submission of proposal No evidence of proposal 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 10 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 5 - 9 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies at least 3 - 4 concepts relating to the solution Uses terminology from research and the work environment correctly, and identifies less than 3 concepts relating to the solution 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
No errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting No more than 5 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting No more than 10 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting Contains more than 10 errors in the paper on the following: works cited, spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraph and sentence structure, APA or MLA formatting 
First Literacy (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
Community and Civic Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project by discussing more than five issues Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project five issues Demonstrates an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project by discussing less than five issues No demonstrated evidence of an understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding Senior Writing Project 
Second Literacy (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
Ethics and Values                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Analyzes more than five ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project Analyses three to five  ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project Analyzes three to five ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senior Writing Project No demonstrated acquisition of tools for analyzing ethics and value questions relating to the selected Senor Writing Project 

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Last Updated:1/5/2007 10:27:59 AM