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MK 385 Consumer Behavior
Cheadle, Sonja Karin


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

MK 385 Consumer Behavior

Semester

U1T 2007 DL

Faculty

Cheadle, Sonja

Title

Adjunct Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Business Administration degree with emphasis in Marketing from Avila University
Bachelor of Science degree in Business from University of Missouri-KC

Daytime Phone

816-507-8552

E-Mail

sonja.cheadle@pirate.park.edu

Semester Dates

June 4- July 29, 2007

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

Suggested prerequisite: MK 351 or equivalent

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Consumers, Second Edition,  by Eric Arnould, Linda Price and George Zinkhan, McGraw-Hill - Irwin, 2004. ISBN:   0072537140.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Recommended Readings: The Wall Street Journal Interactive Edition -  http://www.wsj.com Business Week -  http://www.businessweek.com Fortune -  http://www.fortune.com Barrons -  http://www.barrons.com Student Resources McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347. Park University Online Bookstore - Select "Distance Learning - Graduate," or "Distance Learning Internet," and then click on the appropriate course code (ex. AC 201, PA 501) to see the list of required and optional texts for each course that you are enrolled in.   Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Your Campus Center Administrator can provide advising to you, please contact them for assistance.  If you need contact information for your Campus Center, click here. Online Tutoring Services - Park University has arranged for Online students to receive five hours of free access to Online tutoring and academic support through Smarthinking. If you would like Online tutoring, please contact me to receive their recommendation and information on how to access the Online tutoring. Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success. Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom or your proctor form, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email the Park Helpdesk or call 800-927-3024.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
An integrated approach to the study of various behavioral concepts and theories useful for understanding consumer behavior and its relevance to the development of effective marketing strategies. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Overview and Course Goals Welcome to Consumer Behavior (MK 385) online! This course is designed to provide a theoretical framework and appropriate analytical and practical tools useful for the study of consumer behavior. Incorporated in the course are contributions from a diverse number of disciplines:  individual and social psychology, sociology, economics, and cultural anthropology.  Emphasis is also on  a cross-cultural perspective that explores consumer behavior around the world. The principles and concepts underlying consumer behavior covered in this course are designed to provide an understanding of the consumption experience useful to managers in business, government, and nonprofit organizations.  For marketing practitioners, knowledge of how individuals, families, and groups evaluate, acquire, use, and dispose of goods, services and ideas has significant implications for target marketing, product and service positioning, and developing marketing programs. For students, in general, this course provides useful information on how marketers use strategies and tactics to influence their behavior in the marketplace.  Knowledge of consumer behavior will enhance their ability to exercise effective control over their own consumption experiences. Prerequisite for this course is an introductory course in marketing (MK 351 or equivalent). Background in psychology is useful but it is not necessary. Each week we will focus on different topics and issues related to consumer behavior.  These are reinforced and expanded in our text, Consumers , Second Edition,  by Eric Arnould, Linda Price, and George Zinkhan. Proctored final examinations will be administered during the 8th week of class.  Your instructor will provide you with further guidance.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Define the domain of consumer behavior and explain why knowledge of consumer behavior is of value to you.
  2. Explain how to observe, record, and analyze consumer behavior activity.
  3. Explain how knowledge of consumer behavior impacts the field of marketing and advertising.
  4. Explain how marketers apply various theoretical contributions of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior.
  5. Apply your understanding of factors influencing consumer behavior by analyzing a cases and/or completing a project.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Define the domain of consumer behavior and explain why knowledge of consumer behavior is of value to you.
  2. Discuss the circle of consumption and how consumption relates to other technological and economic processes.
  3. Describe market segmentation, identify a process for segmenting markets and useful segmentation variables and criteria for effective market segmentation.
  4. Discuss the relationship between positioning and targeting.
  5. Describe the basics of consumer research and research techniques.
  6. Explain the complexities of doing international consumer research.
  7. Appreciate the ethical issues raised by market research.
  8. Identify some basic global trends influencing consumption and likely changes in consumer behavior for several different parts of the world.
  9. Understand the meaning and nature of culture, explain the importance of cultural values to consumer behavior and describe some ways of measuring cultural values.
  10. Explain the impact of social class, ethnicity, age, gender, and religion on consumption choices.
  11. Describe how the concept of cultural capital can be used to position products and services.
  12. Discuss the relationship between people
  13. Explain the relationship between personality traits and self-concept and discuss applications of personality theory to consumer behavior.
  14. Describe psychographics and lifestyle research and identify the value and limitations of lifestyle research.
  15. Explain the use of lifestyle data to profile lifestyle segments, identify related lifestyle interests, and locate lifestyle segments geographically.
  16. Describe lifestyle typologies such as VALS, LOV, Japan VALS, and Global Scan.
  17. Explain the meaning of perceptions and associations and discuss some basic facts about the classic five sensory receptors:  vision, smell, hearing, touch, and taste.
  18. Describe how sensory thresholds are used by marketers.
  19. Outline the process through which our sensory systems select, organize, and interpret stimuli, including preattentive processing, perceptual selection, organization and categorization, interpretation, and elaboration.
  20. Describe consumer acquisition strategies and major models of exchange.
  21. Explain the relationship between brand switching and marketing tactics.
  22. Discuss the importance of gift exchange in consumer behavior.
  23. Explain why people buy and consume the things that they do and discuss the meaning of consumer needs, wants, and motivations.
  24. Identify four classic approaches for accounting for human motivation and derive marketing applications  from these theoretical approaches to motivation.
  25. Describe the relationships among consumer experience, learning, memory, and knowledge and explain the marketing implications of these relationships.
  26. Explain the difference between consumer cognitions, affect, and behavior and describe their role in consumer decision making.
  27. Discuss theories that are applied to attitudes and attitude formation and describe their role in consumer behavior.
  28. Explain how household structure and characteristics relate to consumption activities.
  29. Discuss the important role of the family life cycle in consumption activities.
  30. Explain the importance of interpersonal influences for consumer preferences and choices.
  31. Describe the characteristics of innovations -- acceptance of new products and ideas -- that influence their rate of diffusion and help determine their market success.
  32. Describe consumer satisfaction and identify basic factors that influence satisfaction.
  33. Identify a variety of techniques through which consumers derive meaning and value from consumption and explain why meaning is an important issue for marketers.
  34. Discuss some of the practical implications that product disposition has for marketers and explain how understanding disposition provides key insights into consumption behavior.
Core Assessment:

Core Assessment Assignment:  Personal Consumption Journal


The purpose of this project is to help you relate consumer behavior principles to your own consumption experiences and enhance your self-knowledge and understanding of your behavior in the marketplace. This project enables you to not only observe and record your own consumption experiences, but also analyze the factors which might be influencing your buying decisions.


Instructions:


1.  Each student is required to keep a Personal Consumption Journal of all purchases of products and services for four weeks. The weekly entries for purchases should consider the following factors or issues:





      • Date of purchase and time of day

      • Where you shopped (type of store/non-store)

      • Number of stores/web sites you visited

      • Items purchased

      • Brand names

      • Total amount spent  Cash?  Charge?  Other?

      • For whom the items were purchased  Self?  Others?

      • Was it a planned purchase?  Impulse purchase?

      • Sources of information related to the purchases

      • Was someone with you at the time of purchase?  Did they influence your buying?

      • Role of sales people, advertising, coupons, sales, etc.

      • How satisfied you were with your choices

      • Any other significant information related to the purchase

2.  Review your list of products and services you purchased during the four-week period and select at least ten of your larger purchases which best portray your personality, values, and lifestyle.


3.  Using consumer behavior theory and principles, prepare a report in which you analyze the influences that led you to your purchase decisions.  Specifically, examine personality, family, peer, cultural, lifestyle, situational and demographic influences that led you to your purchases.


4.  Your written report for this project should include your Personal Consumption Journal and your analysis of your buying behavior. This report is due at the end of Week 6 and should be posted to the Dropbox for evaluation.


Project Report Format:



  • Report length: 8 to 10 pages double-spaced Microsoft Word document using 1 inch left and right margins

  • You may us Microsoft Excel to record your Personal Consumption Journal entries

  • Submit the report as an attached file to the Dropbox

  • Enter page numbers on all pages, including the first page

  • Spell check and proofread your report

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Examinations A midterm and a final examination are required and will be based on materials covered in the readings.  Specific instructions regarding exams will be posted later in the term. The final examination will be taken in person during the 8th week of instruction at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location approved by your Instructor where Park University sites are not available.   It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term.  The proctor will be accepted and approved by the instructor.  Park University site administrators or adjunct faculty are preferred proctors, but K-12 school teachers, counselors or administrators, certified librarians, testing centers at accredited colleges or universities are acceptable. Approved proctors may also include U.S. Embassy officials, military education officers, or testing control officers at U.S. military bases. Excluded from approval as proctors are family members, relatives, neighbors, friends, clergy, and employers, supervisors and co-workers.   For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test.  A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to me for approval.  Failure to take a final proctored exam will result in an automatic loss of points assigned to the final examination.     Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.  The final exam will count at least 20% of the grade, and will be closed book/closed note; the student must score 60% of better on the final to pass the class, regardless of other work.

Grading:

Evaluation

 The following table shows the points assigned for each component of required work in this course:
 
 

 

Points

Weekly Homework Questions (10 points each)

380

Weekly  Discussion Questions (6 points each)

48

Weekly Discussion "Responses" (4 points each)

32

Case Analyses (25 points each)

100

VALS2 Online Exercise

20

Term Project

100

Midterm Exam

120

Final Exam

200

Total  Points Possible-->

1000

Grading Scale:
 

A = 900 - 1000 points
B = 800 - 899 points
C = 700 - 799 points
D = 600 - 699 points
F = less than 600 points

 

All final exams will be comprehensive and will be closed book and closed notes.  If calculators are allowed, they will not be multifunctional electronic devices that include features such as: phones, cameras, instant messaging, pagers, and so forth.  Electronic Computers will not be allowed on final exams unless an exception is made by the Associate Dean.

The Proctored final exam for online courses must be passed with a grade of 60% or higher in order to pass the course regardless of the overall average.  The grade for students who pass the proctored final will be based on the overall average of homework and tests taken during the course.  The proctored final exam must address only material which the student has been taught in class.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Grading Criteria: Each student is responsible for: completing weekly reading assignments completing weekly homework assignments participating in weekly online discussions completing four case analyses completing the VALS2 online exercise completing a term project completing both a midterm and a proctored final exam.
 
Assignments Homework Questions -- A list of review questions is included at the end of each chapter in the text. Answer any two questions of your choice for each chapter based on the weekly assigned readings. This assignment is to be submitted to the instructor via the dropbox for evaluation at the end of each week.
Online Discussions -- A number of discussion questions will be posted weekly in a thread titled "Online Discussion Questions for Week #." Each student is required to select a question that has not been answered, develop a complete answer, and post it in the thread. In addition, each student is required to post a one- paragraph response to another student's answer.
 
Case Analyses -- A short case titled "You Make the Call" is included at the end of each chapter in the text. Select any four of these nineteen cases and prepare a written analysis, about two pages for each case. Use the questions listed at the end of each case you selected as a guide to formulate your analysis and to adequately address the issues in the case. Two of these case analyses are due at the end of Week 4 and the balance are due at the end of Week 8. All case analyses should be submitted to the instructor via the dropbox for evaluation.
 
VALS2 Online Exercise -- This exercise must be completed by the end of Week 5. Instructions: Review the discussion on VALS2 (Values and Lifestyles Systems) in the text, pages 448 - 453. Then visit the VALS web site at http://www.sric-bi.com/VALS/ and complete the online VALS Survey. Also, at the VALS web site, click on the VALS Types menu item and review the description of each VALS type. Enter the class conference thread titled "Week 5 -- VALS Online Assignment" and post your answers to the following questions: 1. What is your primary VALS type and your secondary, if any? Describe you VALS type using the information provided at the VALS home page. 2. Do you agree with the VALS type the Survey predicted for you? Why or why not? If not, what type do you think you should be? Explain.
 
Term Project -- Personal Consumption Journal The purpose of this project is to help you relate consumer behavior principles to your own consumption experiences and enhance your self-knowledge and understanding of your behavior in the marketplace. This project enables you to not only observe and record your own consumption experiences, but also analyze the factors which might be influencing your buying decisions.
Instructions: 1. Each student is required to keep a Personal Consumption Journal of all purchases of products and services for four weeks. The weekly entries for purchases should consider the following factors or issues:
Date of purchase and time of day
Where you shopped (type of store/non-store)
Number of stores/web sites you visited
Items purchased
Brand names
Total amount spent Cash? Charge? Other?
For whom the items were purchased Self? Others?
Was it a planned purchase? Impulse purchase?
Sources of information related to the purchases
Was someone with you at the time of purchase? Did they influence your buying?
Role of sales people, advertising, coupons, sales, etc.
How satisfied you were with your choices
Any other significant information related to the purchase
(it can be helpful to set up a spreadsheet with many of these factors/issues as your column headers, then enter your purchase information below each - this will help to keep your journal organized and will already be in a great format to turn in when the assignment is due).
2. Review your list of products and services you purchased during the four-week period and select at least ten of your larger purchases which best portray your personality, values, and lifestyle.
3. Using consumer behavior theory and principles, prepare a report in which you analyze the influences that led you to your purchase decisions. Specifically, examine personality, family, peer, cultural, lifestyle, situational and demographic influences that led you to your purchases.
4. Your written report for this project (8 to 10 pages) should include your Personal Consumption Journal and your analysis of your buying behavior.  The 8 to 10 pages includes both your journal and the written portion of your report.  As a rule of thumb, your journal should only take up 2-3 pages of your report - there should be more pages of written analysis. 
This report is due at the end of Week 7 and should be placed in the dropbox for evaluation. NOTE: All written assignments and online postings in this course will be evaluated by the instructor using the following criteria: thoroughness, application of consumer behavior concepts discussed in the readings, clarity, and creative thinking.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89
Academic honesty is the prerequisite for academic study. Academic dishonesty is inimical to the spirit of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers, and other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.

Plagiarism, the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one's original work, sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. This does not make it less serious. However, students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their course faculty member.
  


Academic dishonesty could involve:

having a tutor or a friend complete your work
having a reviewer make extensive revisions of your work
collaborating with other students in completing your work unless you have been instructed to do so
submitting somebody else's work as your own
submitting work that does not represent your original words and/or ideas.  This especially applies to answers to essay questions. Do not copy materials verbatim from the text. Answer the questions in your own words.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90
Professors are required to keep attendance records and report absences throughout the term. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands including temporary duty. The student is responsible for completing all missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods (2 weeks in a term) will be reported to the Dean for appropriate action. Any student failing to attend class for two consecutive weeks, without an approved excuse, will be institutionally withdrawn (unofficially withdrawn) and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded.

Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time online and offline each week including but not limited to responding to the weekly conference discussions, sending/receiving Email, reading and viewing online lectures, completing online quizzes and tests, and conducting research over the World Wide Web.  A rule of thumb is that you should spend approximately 4-5 hours per week online reviewing course content and engaging in group work and discussion and an additional 4-6 hours per week on readings, preparing assignments, or completing papers or examinations.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Uses  9 or more references to  contributions  of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior Uses  5 to 8 references to  contributions  of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior Uses  fewer than 4  references to  contributions  of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior Uses  no references to  contributions sof the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Identifies and analyzes factors influencing personal consumption behavior and thoroughly relates to  consumer behavior principles and theory. Identifies and analyzes factors influencing personal consumption behavior but moderately relates to consumer behavior principles and theory Inadequate analysis of personal consumption behavior and its linkage to consumer behavior principles and theory. Lacks understanding of the scope and nature of the assignment 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Assesses personal consumption behavior thoughtfully and demonstrates reflective and critical understanding of factors influencing it. Assesses personal consumption behavior with moderate understanding of the factors influencing it. Assesses personal consumption behavior bit demonstrates no understanding of the  factors influencing it. No understanding of the outcomes of the assignment. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
No factual errors. 1 or 2 factual errors 3 to 4 factual errors 5 or more factual errors. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Demonstrates mastery of 8 or more   references to  contributions s of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior. Demonstrates mastery of 5 or more   references to  contributions s of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior Demonstrates mastery of fewer than 4   references to  contributions s of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior Demonstrates no  mastery of  the contributions s of the behavioral sciences to the study of consumer behavior 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Thoroughly integrates and applies 9 or more concepts, principles, and theories of consumer behavior to explain personal consumption behavior. Effectively integrates and applies   5 to 8 concepts, principles, and theories of consumer behavior to explain personal consumption behavior. Effectively integrates and applies   3 to 4 concepts, principles, and theories of consumer behavior to explain personal consumption behavior. Integrates and applies  no 8 concepts, principles, and theories of consumer behavior to explain personal consumption behavior. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
No errors in grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling. 1 to 3 errors in grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling 4 to 6 errors in grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling 7 or more errors in grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Contains no errors in the following format items:
•Length
•Pagination
•Internal documentation
 
Contains one erros in the following format items:
•Length
•Pagination
•Internal documentation
 
Contains 2 to 3 errors in the following format items:
•Length
•Pagination
•Internal documentation
 
Contains 4 or more  errors in the following format items:
•Length
•Pagination
•Internal documentation
 

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Last Updated:5/15/2007 3:53:50 PM