Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

IS 315 Computer Systems Analysis and Design I
Haynie, Glyn E.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseIS 315 Computer Systems Analysis and Design I
SemesterF2A2004
FacultyHaynie, Glyn E.
TitleSenior Instructor
Office LocationRoom 107
Office HoursT/TH 1:00 - 5:00 PM
Daytime Phone(512)336-0475
E-Mailglyn.haynie@pirate.park.edu
Semester DatesOctober 25 – December 19 2004
Class Days--T-R--
Class Time7:40 - 10:10 PM
PerquisitesIS205
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Kendall, Systems Analysis & Design, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004, ISBN 0131188798.  Bundled with: Visible Analyst Workbench 7.5 CD.

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Course Description:
This course presents various philosophies, terminology, and techniques used in the analysis and implementation of the system development life cycle.  The student will investigate such areas as project proposals, logical systems, flow diagrams, data remodeling, dictionaries, and documentation.  The student will learn how to use a CASE tool.  Pre-requisite: IS205. 3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Identify stakeholders and describe their roles and individual needs in system development.

2. Understand the Information Systems professional and the user's role in system development in order to achieve user acceptance and a solution that fits both the user's needs and satisfies the business objective.

3. Evaluate strengths/weaknesses and applicable roles of several strategies/methodologies for design of information systems including Model Driven, RAD, Agile, OO development, and Prototyping.

4. Identify problem/opportunity/directive, cause/effect and business requirements for a given problem scenario.

5. Understand and explain project management life cycle, approaches to scheduling, measuring of project progress and relationship to the system development life cycle.

6. Identify the responsibilities of the Project Manager and discuss why they are important to the success of the project.

7. Practice systems analysis traditional tasks:
  • Problem analysis
  • Requirements analysis
  • Decision analysis

8. Build process and data models for analysis within the system development life cycle.

9. Differentiate between logical and physical models.

10. Build communication skills, both oral and written as well as teamwork.

Course Assessment:
A. Complete the following reading assignments prior to coming to class.
    1) Chapter(s) to be presented that night.
    2) Review questions at the end of each chapter.
B. Complete all homework assignments when scheduled.
C. Complete group project assignments when scheduled
D. Complete all examinations when scheduled.
E. Late work is not accepted.

Grading:

Mid Term Examination 30%
Final Examination 30%
Homework/Participation 20%
Project/Presentation 20%

A 100 - 90
B 89 - 80
C 79 – 70
D 69 – 60
F below 60

Late Submission of Course Materials:
No late work accepted.

 Class ActivitiesAssignments
Oct 26Class Policies: Introduction to Course, Description of Project Requirements
and Examinations
Preparing the Systems Proposal.
Chapter 10
Oct 28Assuming the Role of the Systems AnalystChapter 1
Nov 2Understanding Organizational StyleChapter 2
Nov 4Determining Feasibility and
Managing Analysis and Design Activities.
Chapter 3
Nov 9 Information Gathering: Interactive MethodsChapter 4
Nov 11Information Gathering: Intrusive Methods. Chapter 5
Nov 16Mid Term Exam (Chapters 1 -5)Review System Proposal Outline 
Nov 18Prototyping, RAD and Extreme ProgrammingChapter 6
Nov 23Lab/Group Work
Demo Case Tools
System Proposal
Nov 24Using Data Flow DiagramsChapter 7
Nov 30Analyzing Systems Using Data DictionariesChapter 8
Dec 2Describing Process Specifications and Structured DecisionChapter 9
Dec 7Preparing the Systems Proposal Lab/Group Work
Chapter 10
Dec 9Final Examination (Chapters 6 -10)
Lab/Group Work
 
Dec 14Presentations 
Dec 16Final Examination Review
Course Review Project Review
 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergradute Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergradute Catalog Page 100


Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Notes

ADD/DROP: October 25 - November 1, 2004

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW PASSING: November 11, 2004

INCOMPLETES: As a rule, incomplete grades will not be given. Incomplete grades will not be given for student laziness (i.e. work not in on time; missing exams; student missing final…etc.) Exceptions to the rule do exist, however: If a death in the student's immediate family (spouse, child, parent, grandparent, sibling, aunt, or uncle) affects the overall performance of the student in the course or if the student misses a significant portion of class due to their hospitalization, the student may be allowed to petition for an incomplete and make up the work prior to (19 December 2004). The instructor retains the right to veto any such petition, or grant an incomplete in other unforeseen circumstance.

WITHDRAWALS: The enrollment status of the student in this course is solely the responsibility of the student. If you wish to change your status in this course, be sure that you file the appropriate paperwork with the registrar before the appropriate deadlines. If you wish to drop, do not just stop coming to class! Get to the Campus Center Director and file a withdrawal slip. I will continue to consider you part of this class until notified otherwise by the Campus Center Director.

Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.