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SO 302 The Study of the Family
Pena, Sabrina S.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

SO 302 The Study of the Family

Semester

S2T 2006 DLG

Faculty

Pena, Sabrina S.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

B.S. Psychology/Sociology (double major)
M.Ed. Guidance and Counseling
Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Trainer (ASIST) and CISM Certified

Office Location

On-line Texas

Office Hours

By appointment: please email or call to schedule time

Daytime Phone

830-774-1093

Other Phone

830-298-4545

E-Mail

sabrina.pena@park.edu

allaboutkidz@msn.com

sabrina.pena@laughlin.af.mil

Semester Dates

June 5 - July 30, 2006

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Skolnick, A. S., & Skolnick, J. H. (2005). Family in Transition (13th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. ISBN:
0-205-41823-6

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore

http://www.apastyle.org/aboutstyle.html
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/
http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ddegelman/index.cfm?

Course Description:
A study of the family as a social institution and a social group in terms of cross-cultural, historical, and contemporary perspectives.  Current controversies concerning male-female roles, sexual morality, reproduction and other issues are considered.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Education, whether derived from traditional education, on-line education, or life experience, is invaluable to your personal and professional growth.  In this course, we will explore knowledge that you already have obtained as it applies to new material.  Learning will occur in a variety of forums including discussion groups, traditional readings and exploration of reputable information available on the internet.  

You will find that there is a wealth of knowledge available right here in our on-line class – in yourself, your classmates, and in my expertise.  You will find yourself fulfilling the role of both learner and teacher, which many of you will find increases your retention rate of some of the more complex material.

Welcome to SO 302!  I look forward to facilitating, but more importantly learning from each of you throughout our 8 weeks together!

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze the family as a social institution and a social group in terms of cross-cultural, historical and contemporary perspectives.
  2. Examine current controversies concerning male-female roles, sexual morality, reproduction and other issues.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Compose a definition of the family that reflects his or her understanding of the family today.
  2. Explain why the authors chose the term Family In Transition as the title for the text.
  3. Compare the current status of the family with the status of the family during the idealized "Golden Age" of the 1950s.
  4. Assess how the sexual and gender revolutions experienced by American society have challenged traditional gender roles and conceptions of marriage.
  5. Examine the historical development of the "cult of domesticity" and how the division of household labor reveals the relative power of members of the marital relationship.
  6. Propose a meaningful answer to the question; are we losing confidence in marriage?
  7. Compare and contrast the major tenets of divorce culture and marriage culture.
  8. Identify the major differences in the approaches to childcare that are employed in European countries and the United States.
  9. Summarize the findings of research on what children think about their working parents.
  10. Evaluate the accuracy of the statement, "when the economy falters, families tremble."
  11. Define the term and assess how working couples with children deal with the demands of the "second shift."
  12. Summarize the significant characteristics of African American families that distinguish them from white families or other minority families.
  13. Predict the outcome of the efforts of gay and lesbian parents to reinvent the family as a pluralistic phenomenon.
  14. Formulate a response to the question, why do teenage girls get pregnant when almost no one approves of it?
  15. Interpret the statement, poor women avoid marriage not because they think too little of it, but because they think too much of it.
  16. Appraise the myths that sociologists state are associated with the battering of women.
Core Assessment:

 Core Assessment Assignment

 

Research Paper

 

Drawing upon information gained from your research, the text and course discussions, analyze the changing structure and functioning of the family with regard to the following issues: the importance of marriage; gender roles; the place of children in the family; sexuality and the bearing of children; single parent families; the employment of parents with children; differences between African American or Asian American families and white families; and the acceptance of gay and lesbian families.

 

Additional questions to address:

 

  • What was the idealized family structure of the 1950's?  How does the ideal of the 1950's compare to the family of today?  Are the value judgments made about the structure and functioning of today's family in comparison to the 1950's ideal fair or unfair?
  • What will the family look like in 2026?  What will the family mean to its members and to American society 20 years from today?

 

Research Paper Format

 

  • Paper must be eight to ten pages in length (2,000 to 2,500 words).
  • At least five sources must be used to write the paper, not including the text and class notes.
  • American Psychological Association (APA) format must be used in preparing the paper.
  • Sources are to be properly cited following APA Style and included in a list of references at the end of the paper.
  • Complete the paper as a Word document and place it in the proper folder in the Electronic Dropbox.
  • Number all pages, including the first page, at the bottom, center.
  • Be sure to proofread the paper and run spell check and grammar check.
  • Assignment is due at the end of Week 7.
  • 50 points possible.
  • Assignment counts for 25% of the total points for the course.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Students are responsible for:

1.      Completing the reading assignments.

2.      Participating in the class through discussion of topics introduced by the instructor and responding to submissions by classmates.

3.      Completing the writing assignments, including the Research Paper. See the Writing Assignments section of the syllabus for more information.

4.      Completing the Proctored Exam. This will be a comprehensive final examination that is given the last week of class. See the Proctored Exam section of the syllabus for more information.

Writing Assignments

1.      Definitions of the Family - During the first and last weeks of the class (Weeks 1 and 8), you are to compose a definition of the family that best reflects your understanding of the family today.  Composing the definitions at the beginning and the end of the class is a method of assessing learning and will enable you to determine if your understanding of family changes as a result of participation in the course.

2.      Reaction Papers – The Reaction Papers are to be one-page reactions to a topic introduced by the instructor or to some aspect of one of the assigned readings for the week. In preparing the papers, you may chose to comment on what you believe is an important point made in the reading or by the instructor, agree or disagree with a statement or conclusion of the author or offer a related personal observation based on your own experience. Students will be asked to post the Reaction Papers in the discussion threads for discussion with their classmates.

3.      Internet Assignment #1 – For Internet Assignment #1, you are to prepare an annotated list of five Internet sites related to the family or an associated social issue. By annotated, I mean a detailed description of the site including: the correct URL, the author or source, a brief description of the purpose of the site (why it was developed), the information contained in the site and the value of the site for students or others in sociology or a related social science field.  Students should use the assignment to explore possible topics for the Research Paper. An example of the assignment will be provided.

4.      Internet Assignment #2 – For Internet Assignment #2, you are to evaluate two web sites that you are considering using as references in the Research Paper or two of the sites selected for Internet Assignment #1, using the evaluation criteria provided in the following web site:

        Beck, S. (1997). "Evaluation Criteria." The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly: or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources. Retrieved October 9, 2005, from New Mexico State University Library's website: http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/evalcrit.html.

           In addition, for each of the two web sites you are to identify which of the three major theoretical paradigms of sociology (structural-functional, social-conflict, symbolic-interaction) or a combination of paradigms, if any, is paramount in the views and content of the sites and justify your choice by referring to the tenets of the paradigm(s).

           Furthermore, you are to list the web sites in proper American Psychological Association (APA) Style, as if you were citing the web sites as references in a research paper.  Information about using APA Style to cite references may be found on the following web pages:

       http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html

       http://webster.commnet.edu/apa/apa_index.htm

       http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html

       http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ddegelman/index.cfm?doc_id=796

5.      Research Paper – The Research Paper is to be eight to ten pages in length (2,000 to 2,500 words) and focus on a topic related to the family. The topic needs to be selected and discussed with the instructor by the fourth week of the class. At least five sources are to be used to write the paper. The sources are to be properly cited using APA Style and included in a list of References at the end of the paper.

Drawing upon information gained from your research, the text and course discussions, analyze the changing structure and functioning of the family with regard to the following issues: the importance of marriage; gender roles; the place of children in the family; sexuality and the bearing of children; single parent families; the employment of parents with children; differences between African American or Asian American families and white families; and the acceptance of gay and lesbian families.

Additional questions to address:

What was the idealized family structure of the 1950's?  How does the ideal of the 1950's compare to the family of today?  Are the value judgments made about the structure and functioning of today's family in comparison to the 1950's ideal fair or unfair?
What will the family look like in 2026?  What will the family mean to its members and to American society 20 years from today?

Research Paper Format

Paper must be eight to ten pages in length (2,000 to 2,500 words).
At least five sources must be used to write the paper, not including the text and class notes.
American Psychological Association (APA) format must be used in preparing the paper.
Sources are to be properly cited following APA Style and included in a list of references at the end of the paper.
Complete the paper as a Word document and place it in the proper folder in the Electronic Dropbox.
Number all pages, including the first page, at the bottom, center.
Be sure to proofread the paper and run spell check and grammar check.
Assignment is due at the end of Week 7.
50 points possible.
Assignment counts for 25% of the total points for the course.
Proctored Final Exam

Park University requires the completion of a “significant exam” in the presence of an approved proctor by each student who is enrolled in an Internet course. “Approved proctors shall include testing center administrators; K-12 teachers, counselors or administrators; certified librarians; U.S. Embassy officials; military test control officers or unit education officers; and accredited college or university faculty members or administrators. Excluded from approval as proctors shall be family members, friends, neighbors, employers, supervisors, coworkers, clergy or other students and adjunct faculty members at colleges or universities.” Preferred proctors are staff at Park's campus centers. Students within one hour driving distance of a Park University campus should request a proctor from that campus.  Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

“It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor who will be accepted and approved by the instructor. For these proctored examinations, photo identification is required.” The completed proctor form must be received by the instructor and the proctor approved before the exam may be taken. Instructions for completing the proctor form will be sent to all students by the Online Administration and the form may be found at: http://proctor.park.edu.

The exam will be sent to the proctor with instructions for administration. The exam must be completed in the presence of the proctor during the eighth week of the term and returned by the proctor to the instructor.  The student may not return the paper to the instructor.

You will have two hours to complete the exam. You may use a computer to take the exam and the proctor may email me the finished product. The exam will be a closed book, closed note exam consisting of multiple choice and short essay questions. Per university policy, failure to take the exam will result in a grade of F for the course.

Other Information on proctored exams:

It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.  
Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.  
A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.  
Failure to take a proctored final exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.  

It should be understood that class participation is a separate category and is not associated with the submission of Reaction Papers or completion of other writing assignments. Points are awarded for the posting of replies to the discussion topics introduced by the instructor or the comments of other members of the class. 2.5 points may be earned per week. To earn the weekly participation points, responses must be posted by the end of the class week (midnight Sunday). Late participation is welcome but will receive no points, unless approved by the instructor before hand.

Grading:
- The course is graded A-F and is based on a point scale.
Grades for the course will be determined as follows:

Assignment, Percentage, Points

Definition of the Family #1, 2.5%, 5

Definition of the Family #2, 2.5%, 5

Class Participation, 10%, 20

Reaction Paper #1, 5%, 10

Reaction Paper #2, 5%, 10

Reaction Paper #3, 5%, 10

Reaction Paper #4, 5%, 10

Internet Assignment #1, 5%, 10

Internet Assignment #2, 10%, 20

Research Paper, 25%, 50

Proctored Exam, 25%, 50

Total 100%, 200 points

It should be understood that class participation is a separate category and is not associated with the submission of Reaction Papers or completion of other writing assignments. Points are awarded for the posting of replies to the discussion topics introduced by the instructor or the comments of other members of the class. 2.5 points may be earned per week. To earn the weekly participation points, responses must be posted by the end of the class week (midnight Sunday). Late participation is welcome but will receive no points, unless approved by the instructor before hand.



1.  Definitions of the Family #1 and 2

Due Weeks 1 and 8
Points assigned based on whether or not the assignment is completed and submitted by the due date.
5 points possible for each assignment.

2.  Reaction Papers #1, 2, 3 and 4

Due Weeks 1, 3, 5 and 6
Points assigned based on whether or not the assignment is completed and submitted by the due date.
10 points possible for each assignment.

3.  Internet Assignment #1

Due Week 2
Points assigned based on the following criteria:
5 sites reviewed with correct URLs given - 1 point for each site.
Value of the sites for students or others in sociology or a related social science field - 1 point for each site.
10 points possible for the assignment.

4.  Internet Assignment #2

Due Week 4
Points assigned based on the following criteria:
2 sites evaluated using the 5 Beck criteria - 1 point for each criteria.
Major theoretical paradigms identified - 2.5 points for each site.
Sites properly cited using APA Style - 2.5 points for each site.
20 points possible for the assignment.

5.  Research Paper

Due Week 7
Points assigned based on the learning rubric.

6.   Proctored Final Exam

To be taken Week 8
Points assigned based on the following criteria:
30 multiple-choice questions - 1 point for each question.
2 short essay questions - 10 points for each essay.
50 points possible for the exam.

Course Grading Scale

A =   90-100%     180 to 200 points
B =   80-89%      160 to 179 points
C =   70-79%      140 to 159 points
D =   60-69%      120 to 139 points
F =   < 60%       119 points or lower

Late Submission of Course Materials:
- It is your responsibility to plan for computer problems, emergencies, illness, etc. and to turn your work in within the contract time frame. Please ensure you allow adequate time to complete assignments and secure a back-up plan for your computer.
- With regard to the writing assignments, the syllabus specifies when they are due and I would like them to be submitted as Word or Word compatible documents (rtf is acceptable).
- Don't wait until the last minute to submit the assignments. As the syllabus indicates, they are due at midnight Sunday of the week in which they are assigned. Yes, I will accept assignments if they are late, but your score on the assignment is determined and then reduced by 50%.
- Participation is an essential part of the course. As the Grading Plan indicates, participation counts for 10% of the grade for the class and you may earn 2.5 points per week. To receive participation points, you must participate in the class discussion for the week by replying to the threads introduced by the instructor or to the comments posted by your classmates. While I am not expecting a dissertation, it is necessary to post a thoughtful response of more than just a few words to receive the points. Late postings to the weekly discussions are welcome, but will not receive participation points unless approved by the instructor. I want to stress that participation is different from submitting the Reaction Papers. Submitting the Reaction Papers will not earn you points for participation; a reply in the class discussion is necessary.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
I would like to comment on the necessity for respecting the opinions of others. A tiny minority of people seem to feel that the anonymity of Online communication, such as chat rooms or email, enables them to write whatever they want to write in any manner they want to write it. I do not anticipate any problems with rudeness in our class and I want everyone to know that the conventions of Online etiquette will be carefully observed. This is a university class and everyone deserves our respect and understanding when they share their opinions and comments. Additionally, postings to the class discussions are a public and permanent record and things written in the “heat of the moment” cannot be easily forgotten or retracted, as may be the case in strictly verbal communication.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Week 1: The Changing Family

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 1, the student will:

  Compose a definition of the family that reflects his or her understanding of the family today.

  Explain why the authors chose the term Family In Transition as the title for the text.

  Compare the current status of the family with the status of the family during the idealized "Golden Age" of the 1950s.

Discussion Topics –

  Introduction, Course Overview
  Major Theoretical Paradigms in Sociology
  The Family in Transition

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Introduction,
  Readings 3, 4, 5 and 7

Writing Assignments –

  Definition of the Family #1
  Reaction Paper #1


Week 2: The Sexes and Sexuality

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 2, the student will:

  Assess how the sexual and gender revolutions experienced by American society have challenged traditional gender roles and conceptions of marriage.

  Examine the historical development of the "cult of domesticity" and how the division of household labor reveals the relative power of members of the marital relationship.

Discussion Topics –

  Theoretical Interpretations of the Family
  Changing Gender Roles
  Sexuality and Society

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Introduction to Part II,
Readings 8, 9, 10 and 13

Writing Assignment –

  Internet Assignment #1


Week 3: Courtship and Marriage, Divorce and Remarriage

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 3, the student will:

  Propose a meaningful answer to the question; are we losing confidence in marriage?

  Compare and contrast the major tenets of divorce culture and marriage culture.

Discussion Topics –

  How the Family is Formed
  Courtship and Marriage
  Divorce and Remarriage

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Readings 16, 17, 18 and 20

Writing Assignment –

  Reaction Paper #2


Week 4: Parents, Children and Childhood

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 4, the student will:

  Identify the major differences in the approaches to childcare that are employed in European countries and the United States.

  Summarize the findings of research on what children think about their working parents.

Discussion Topics –

  Why the Family is Formed
  Parents and Children
  Childhood
  APA Style

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Introduction to Part III, Readings 22, 23, 24 and 26

Writing Assignments –

  Internet Assignment #2


Week 5: Work and Family

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 5, the student will:

  Evaluate the accuracy of the statement, "when the economy falters, families tremble."

  Define the term and assess how working couples with children deal with the demands of the "second shift."

Discussion Topics –

  Families in Society
  Work and the Family
  Grading Criteria for Research Papers

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Introduction to Part IV, Readings 28, 29 and 30

Writing Assignment –

  Reaction Paper #3


Week 6: Dimensions of Diversity

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 6, the student will:

  Summarize the significant characteristics of African American families that distinguish them from white families or other minority families.

  Predict the outcome of the efforts of gay and lesbian parents to reinvent the family as a pluralistic phenomenon.

Discussion Topics –

  African American Families
  Latino Families
  Gay and Lesbian Families
  Interpretations of the "Normal American Family"

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Readings 32, 33, 34 and 35

Writing Assignment –

  Reaction Paper #4


Week 7: Trouble in the Family: Part One

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 7, the student will:

  Formulate a response to the question, why do teenage girls get pregnant when almost no one approves of it?

  Interpret the statement, poor women avoid marriage not because they think too little of it, but because they think too much of it.  

Discussion Topics –

  Teenpregnancy
  Why Poor Mothers Stay Single

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Readings 36 & 37

Writing Assignment –

  Research Paper


Week 8: Trouble in the Family: Part Two

Learning Objectives -

Through the learning activities of Week 8, the student will:

  Compose a definition of the family that reflects his or her understanding of the family today.

  Appraise the myths that sociologists state are associated with the battering of women.

Discussion Topics –

  Domestic Violence

Reading Assignment –

  Skolnick & Skolnick: Reading 38

Writing Assignment –

  Definition of the Family #2
  Proctored Final Exam

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-87
Plagiarized materials will result in automatic failure of the course and my recommendation to the University for your removal from the Park University system. I have found several students enrolled in my Independent Study class plagiarizing in the past. When you do not give credit to others for their ideas or work, you are stealing. Without honor or integrity, the academic process is disgraced by plagiarism. Plagiarism sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance, but it does not make it less serious or excuse the behavior. If you find your self asking, "Should I give credit?" -- the answer is always affirmative.  You can always consult me if you have questions. Enough on that subject!

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2005-2006 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89
A class week is defined as the time between Monday and Sunday. The first week begins the first day of class and ends at midnight the following Sunday. Writing assignments should be submitted so that I have them no later than Sunday midnight of the class week in which they are due.

Since this is an online course, it is preferred that you submit assignments via eCollege. You must make arrangements with me prior to submitting assignments in some other fashion. If you have problems submitting assignments, contact me immediately and we will attempt to resolve the problem.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
                                                  
Uses 6 or more sources Uses 5 sources Uses fewer than 5 sources Uses no sources 
Analysis                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
1, 2                                               
Analyzes the changing structure and functioning of the family in terms of 10 or more of the issues identified in the assignment. Analyzes the changing structure and functioning of the family in terms of 9 of the 10 issues identified in the assignment. Analyzes the changing structure and function of the family in terms of less than 9 of the issues identified in the assignment. Does not analyze the changing structure and function of the family in terms of the issues identified in the assignment. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2                                               
Displays unique insights and presents superlative ideas in assessing the influence of the idealized family structure of the 1950's on the concept of the family today and critiquing the value judgments placed upon the family's structure and functioning. Displays some insights and presents sound ideas in assessing the influence of the idealized family structure of the 1950's on the concept of the family today and critiquing the value judgments placed upon the family's structure and functioning. Displays limited insights and presents few ideas in assessing the influence of the idealized family structure of the 1950's on the concept of the family today and critiquing the value judgments placed upon the family's structure and functioning. Does not assess the influence of the idealized family structure of the 1950's on the concept of the family today or critique the value judgments placed upon the family's structure and functioning. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                            
Outcomes
1, 2                                               
Demonstrates superior knowledge of terminology.  No factual errors. Accurately uses most terminology.  1 factual error. Accurately uses some terminology.  2 or 3 factual errors. Does not accurately use terminology.  More than 3 factual errors. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
1, 2                                               
Demonstrates mastery in analyzing 10 or more of the issues identified in the assignment. Demonstrates mastery in analyzing 9 of the 10 issues identified in the assignment. Demonstrates limited mastery in analyzing 8 or less of the issues identified in the assignment. Demonstrates no mastery by analyzing none of the issues identified in the assignment. 
Application                                                                                                                                            
Outcomes
1, 2                                               
Effectively incorporates (rather than merely mentions or borrows too heavily from) 6 or more sources to support the analysis of the issues. Effectively incorporates (rather than merely mentions or borrows too heavily from) 5 sources to support the analysis of the issues. Incorporates in a limited fashion (rather than merely mentions or borrows too heavily from) 4 or less sources to support the analysis of the issues. Incorporates no sources to support the analysis of the issues. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
                                                  
No errors in writing conventions (grammar/punctuation/sentence structure/paragraph construction/ typing and spelling).  Ideas are clearly expressed and the writing is easy to read. Minimal errors (1 to 3) in writing conventions (grammar/punctuation/sentence structure/paragraph construction/typing and spelling).  Ideas are clearly expressed with a few exceptions and the writing, for the most part, is easy to read (1 to 3 instances of poor syntax). Several errors (4 to 6) in writing conventions (grammar/punctuation/sentence structure/paragraph construction/ typing and spelling).  Ideas are not clearly expressed and the writing is not easy to read (4 to 6 instances of poor syntax) Many errors (7 or more) in writing conventions (grammar/punctuation/sentence structure/paragraph construction/ typing and spelling).  Ideas are not presented in an intelligible manner and the writing is unreadable (7 or more instances of poor syntax). 

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Last Updated:4/26/2006 10:08:33 PM