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CA 241 Photography I
Lofflin, John


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 241 Photography I

Semester

FA 2006 HOZ

Faculty

Lofflin, John

Title

Associate professor of journalism

Degrees/Certificates

MA

Office Location

Copley 1 South

Office Hours

Posted

Daytime Phone

816-584-6327

E-Mail

john.lofflin@park.edu

Semester Dates

Fall 2006 Independent Study

Class Days

W

Class Time

1:50-4:40 p.m.

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor

Credit Hours

4


Textbook:

The Ansel Adams Guide by John Schaefer

Kodak Black&White Data Guide

 

Textbooks can be purchased though the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:

(AR 241) An introduction to the basic techniques of black and white photography. Cameras, lenses, films, lighting, composition, etc, are discussed. Students must provide an acceptable camera and expendable supplies. Darkroom work is required and a darkroom fee is charged. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. 2:6:4

“...the purpose of media education is to produce well-rounded graduates who have critical thinking skills as well as practical skills, and who have an understanding of the philosophy of the media and a dedication to the public service role that the media have in our society.”

-- Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication

Curriculum Task Force, 1996, p. 106

 

THE MISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION ARTS / JOURNALISM

The communication arts graduate in journalism is a thinking journalist capable of adapting to change and creating change in the profession, open-minded, committed to truth and the empowerment of all citizens through the arts of journalism. Specifically, the graduate exhibits excellence in craft and an analytical approach to problems. The graduate recognizes excellence and strives to produce it. The graduate's professional and personal ethics are in harmony, motivated by a sense of purpose for good in the community. The graduate celebrates individuality and respects differences while searching for the common good.

 

HOW THIS COURSE FITS INTO THE DEPARTMENT MISSION

 

·        Photography I prepares the student with essential photographic skills

·        Photography I leads the student to her or his own concept of excellent in the art

·        Photography I students discuss ethical concerns in the visual media

·        Photography I students may develop a love of photography that will inspire life-long learning

 

Educational Philosophy:

Engagement with the ideas of the course is the essential prerequisite for higher level learning. The teacher serves as a guide to the construction of meaning, the development of skills and dispositions, the recognition of what constitutes excellence, and the consideration of ethical issues.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Operate cameras manually to make quality images.
  2. Evaluate light accurately to produce negatives that are easy to print.
  3. Make  clean  negatives with sufficient exposure to print easily.
  4. Make effective good quality  prints from your own negatives.
  5. Dry-mount your own prints.
  6. Experiment with alternative techniques.
  7. Find an outlet for expression in photography, after exploring the possibilities of the medium.
  8. Critique your own work and develop your own criteria of excellence


Core Assessment:

Core Assessment: PHOTO ESSAY



Due at the final

The essay will cover a single subject or event, in this case a craftsman at work. Think in terms of an event that would happen if you were not present. The essay should include people and faces and tell a story without any words. The essay should be told with five to seven photographs dry mounted on a 16-by-20 inch white mounting board.

An essay includes:
1.      An image that visually dominates the design.
2.      An image that provide perspective.
3.      Images that provide crucial visual details about the story.

The photographs should be similar in texture and contrast. No project should include even one photograph that is out of focus (even a little bit), has a dust or chemical spot, is crooked in the frame, or scratched. When in doubt, leave it out. The design should follow the principles of the poem illustration: all internal borders should be the same -- about a quarter-inch -- and the lines of the photographs should lead back into the display, not off the page. These simple design rules will serve you well.

The presentation will include strong technical details about all the photographs. You will receive two grades: one for the photographs and one for your ability to talk about the technical details of how they were made and analyze how they might be improved.











CA 241


(AR 241)


Photography I


An introduction to the basic techniques of black and white photography.  Cameras, lenses, films, lighting, composition, etc, are discusses.  Students must provide an acceptable camera and expendable supplies.  Darkroom work is required and a darkroom fee is charged.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.  2:6:4


 


1) You will begin to visualize the image before you push the button. That means:          


A. You will have confidence about the results.


B. You will control each sequence in the process


·         operate cameras manually to make quality images.


·        evaluate light accurately to produce negatives that are easy to print.


·        make your own clean negatives with sufficient exposure to print easily


·        make effective prints from your negatives.


·        make fine prints from your negatives.


·        dry-mount your own prints.


 


2) You will know what your are doing:


A. When I ask, you will know exactly what you did to produce the image


B. You will begin to diagnose your own problems


·        experiment with alternative techniques.


·        discover an outlet for expression in photography, after exploring the possibilities of the medium.


·        possess sufficient understanding to critique your own work and develop your own criteria of excellence


 


3) You will develop -- and articulate -- strategies for making images. Strategy is where art meets craft.


 


2006


·        You will be given about 10 photographic problems to solve across the semester.  They will be sequentially more difficult as time passes, so you are encouraged not to fall behind, nor to work ahead.  Each solution will be given an individual grade on a scale of one to 10, for a total of 100 points.  No more than three may be printed using the computer.


·        You will be given assignments for a mid-term project and a final project.  Each will be worth 100 points. 


·        * The final project will be due at the final (no final exam will be given) and the presentation of it will be part of the grade.  Both projects must be wet printed.


·        A 10-point quiz over the material safety data sheets will be given at the beginning of the third week.


 


Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

You will be given about 10 photographic problems to solve across the semester. They will be sequentially more difficult as time passes, so you are encouraged not to fall behind, nor to work ahead. No more than three may be printed using the computer.

You will be given assignments for a mid-term project and a final project. The final project will be due at the final (no final exam will be given) and your presentation of it will be part of the grade. Both projects must be wet printed.

A 10-point quiz over the material safety data sheets will be given at the beginning of the third week.

 

Grading:

Each solution will be given an individual grade on a scale of one to 10, for a total of 100 points.

Each project will be worth 100 points.

The portfolio will be evaluated at the conclusion of the course.

 

I will grade projects using letter grades with pluses and minuses. To compute the final grade I will assign values to those grades, then average the values.

A         = 11 points

A-        = 10 points

B+       = 9 points

B          = 8 points

B-        = 7 points

C+       = 6 points

C         = 5 points

C-        = 4 points

D+       = 3 points

D         = 2 points

D-        = 1 point

 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Deadlines will be discussed in detail when each assignment is made and, where possible, included on the working syllabus.

 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Special note:

 

If you are pregnant, or think you might be, at any time during the semester, please see me. I will ask you to check with your doctor before continuing to use the darkroom. You will be allowed to finish your assignments utilizing the computer for printing or to work in the lab with your doctor's approval. Thank you.

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Topics and order of topics may vary. See the working syllabus and be present in class to learn of changes.

 

·        Loading, focusing, holding the camera

·        Judging exposure accurately, then creatively

·        Composing in the camera

·        Composing in the enlarger

·        Making quality negatives -- understanding the relationship of film speed, contrast and grain

·        Printing accurately, then creatively; dodging, burning, use of contrast filters, Saran Wrap, et al.

·        Basic computer printing

·        Photographing people, nature, moving targets, subjects in challenging light, using depth of field and shutter speed for effect

·        Story-telling by bringing all these skills to the table

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The student adapts  principles and techniques covered in the course to the problems presented by the setting for the final essay. With prompting, the student describes this adaptation strategy. This project will have required sophisticated adaptation because the setting has not been described or experienced previously in the semester. The student will clearly discuss this. The student adapts  principles and techniques covered in the course to the problems presented by the setting for the final essay. With prompting, the student describes this adaptation strategy. The student does not adapt  principles and techniques covered in the course to the problems presented by the setting for the final essay. When asked, the student does not recognize adaptation. The project does not venture beyond the sunlit settings enumerated across the semester. The student reports no manipulation of prints, although manipulation is obviously needed. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
When asked in the presentation about certain images in the project, the student imagines how changes in the process or the setting might change the images. The student predicts outcome for all questions without prompting When asked in the presentation about certain images in the project, the student imagines how changes in the process or the setting might change the images. The student predicts outcome for all questions with prompting. When asked in the presentation about certain images in the project, the student imagines how changes in the process or the setting might change the images. The student falters in this, but is able, with prompting, to predict at least one outcome. The student cannot utilize the principles and technical information from the course to predict imaginary outcomes when asked. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
All the images are well chosen. When asked, the student articulates appropriate evaluation of the images utilizing the technical criteria and principles of the course. The excellent presentation includes critique of the principles themselves. The student argues for an innovation. All the images are well chosen. When asked, the student articulates appropriate evaluation of the images utilizing the technical criteria and principles of the course. The student is able to critique her own work. The student chooses images for the project which are weak, particularly in the area of technical criteria. This is evidence the student is not able to evaluate the quality of her work. The student's images are all weak and the student is unable to recognize in oral presentation why they are not acceptable. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student has read more than assigned and uses more vocabulary than expected. The student uses the vocabulary of photography appropriately in response to all questions about the photographs. The student uses the vocabulary of photography appropriately in response to some questions but falters and/or requires prompting for others. The student does not use the vocabulary. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Three general principles are articulated across the semester and the student will be asked to identify them in the photographs shown in the final essay, where appropriate. The three principles are: 1) Lines and shapes should be appropriate to the subject within the frame, 2) Focus, light and shutter speed are tools used to isolate and identify subjects, 3) The size of the light source defines the character of the light, 4) Depth of field and motion are tools for making statements in images. The student uses these tools to create images and is able to identify which tools were used when asked in the oral question period. When asked which principles could be used to change the images in the project (inprove, recast) the student always provides a confident, appropriate answer. In the excellent presentation, the student will also speak fluently about the strategy employed to create the photographs and describe alternative strategies using the general principles. Three general principles are articulated across the semester and the student will be asked to identify them in the photographs shown in the final essay, where appropriate. The three principles are: 1) Lines and shapes should be appropriate to the subject within the frame, 2) Focus, light and shutter speed are tools used to isolate and identify subjects, 3) The size of the light source defines the character of the light, 4) Depth of field and motion are tools for making statements in images. The student uses these tools to create images and is able to identify which tools were used when asked in the oral question period. In the above average presentation, when asked which principles could be used to change the images in the project (improve, recast) the student always provides a confident, appropriate answer. Three general principles are articulated across the semester and the student will be asked to identify them in the photographs shown in the final essay, where appropriate. The three principles are: 1) Lines and shapes should be appropriate to the subject within the frame, 2) Focus, light and shutter speed are tools used to isolate and identify subjects, 3) The size of the light source defines the character of the light, 4) Depth of field and motion are tools for making statements in images. The student uses these tools to create images and is able to identify which tools were used when asked in the oral question period. The student should be able to do this for most of the photographs in the project. The student is unable to identify or articulate any of the general principles in relationship to the images in the project., 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The application stage of the final photoessay is evidenced by the data provided about the images and the responses of the student to oral questions at the presentations. 1) Is the student fluent applying technical information about the camera to the making of these images? Evidence: Is the data provided complete, appropriate and probably accurate [given the nature of the image]? Does the student respond appropriate to questions about the images? Example: If I ask, "What f-stop and shutter speed did you use to make that image?" the student answers with an appropriate shutter speed and f-stop; 2) Is the student fluent applying the principles of the darkroom to the images in question? Evidence here is similar to questions about use of the camera. A successful student provides useful data and appropriate answers for applying previous knowledge to at least three of the images in the project. In addition, the excellent student articulates ways to use this previously acquired technical knowledge to improve individual images and articulates an overall strategy for making the images in the project based in previous knowledge The application stage of the final photoessay is evidenced by the data provided about the images and the responses of the student to oral questions at the presentations. 1) Is the student fluent applying technical information about the camera to the making of these images? Evidence: Is the data provided complete, appropriate and probably accurate [given the nature of the image]? Does the student respond appropriate to questions about the images? Example: If I ask, "What f-stop and shutter speed did you use to make that image?" the student answers with an appropriate shutter speed and f-stop; 2) Is the student fluent applying the principles of the darkroom to the images in question? Evidence here is similar to questions about use of the camera. A successful student provides useful data and appropriate answers for applying previous knowledge to at least three of the images in the project. In addition, the above average student articulates ways to use this previously acquired technical knowledge to improve individual images The application stage of the final photo-essay is evidenced by the data provided about the images and the responses of the student to oral questions at the presentations. 1) Is the student fluent applying technical information about the camera to the making of these images? Evidence: Is the data provided complete, appropriate and probably accurate [given the nature of the image]? Does the student respond appropriate to questions about the images? Example: If I ask, "What f-stop and shutter speed did you use to make that image?" the student answers with an appropriate shutter speed and f-stop; 2) Is the student fluent applying the principles of the darkroom to the images in question? Evidence here is similar to questions about use of the camera. A successful student provides useful data and appropriate answers for applying previous knowledge to at least three of the images in the project. The student articulates insufficient or inappropriate data or answers to questions. The student does not articulate application of technical information to the images in question. 

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Last Updated:8/20/2006 12:40:05 PM