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IS 315 Computer Systems Analysis and Design I
Cook, Ray


SYLLABUS

I. COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: IS-315
II. COURSE DESCRIPTOR: Core Course
III. COURSE TITLE: Computer Systems Analysis and Design I
IV. SEMESTER/TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT: Fall II - 2004
V. NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Ray B. Cook, Jr.
VI. TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Senior Instructor
VII. FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION: Quantico MCB ED Center, Bldg 3088
VIII. FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: 30 minute prior to class or by phone as needed
IX. FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: (540) 288-3603
X. FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: ray.cook@park.edu
XI. OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS: rbcookjr@adelphia.net
XII. DATES OF THE SEMESTER/TERM: 18 Oct – 18 Dec 2004
XIII. CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Wednesday
XIV. CLASS SESSION TIME: 1730 - 2230
XV. PREREQUISITE (S): IS-205.3:0:3
XVI. CREDIT HOURS: 3

XVII. MISSION STATEMENT:
The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

XVIII. VISION STATEMENT:
Park University will be a renowned leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners with in the global society.

XIX. COURE DESCRIPTION:
This course presents various philosophies, terminology, and techniques used in the analysis and implementation of the system development life cycle. The student will investigate such areas as project proposals, logical systems, flow diagrams, data remodeling, dictionaries, and documentation. The student will learn how to use a CASE tool.
Prerequisite: IS205.3:0:3

XX. FACULTY’S EDCUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:
I encourage lively discussion based on both my experiences and the students' experiences along with our current activities. Moreover, each student is encouraged to engage interactively with both fellow students and instructor to share and provide experiences with research and laboratory activities from both class assignments and employment activities. Each student is encouraged to bring and discuss articles from periodicals, newspapers, Internet and technical writings that are germane to the Systems Analysis and Design discipline.

XXI. COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Each student is required to successfully complete five of six homework quizzes consisting mainly of definitions; multiple workshops; satisfactory completion of both the Mid-Term and Final Exams, and the satisfactory completion Phase I of the Systems Analysis and Design Project.

1. Critical Literacy: The students will understand and master the basic communication, computing, and information management in terms of gathering, evaluating, processing and distributing information. In addition, the students will also be able to explain SDLC, RAD, data flow diagrams, as well as Entity Relation Diagrams. The students will learn to recognize major ways proposed for resolving value questions and the ability to identify and use them where appropriate on particular solutions.
2. Civic Literacy: The student will recognize the existence of diverse alternative systems and their global relationships. The students will also understand the social political and economic issues in developing, designing and implementing a computer system.
3. Scientific Literacy: The student will examine the mechanics of the SDLC for effective use in the application of analysis and design.
4. The student will:
a. Learn the steps in the preliminary investigation;
b. Learn the system development process;
c. Understand the general tools and techniques of systems analysis;
d. Apply the preliminary investigation and systems analysis phase;
e. Understand requirements modeling and systems design specification;
f. Learn, understand, and apply the activities of the SDLC.

XXII. COURSE TEXTBOOKS:
Systems Analysis and Design Sixth Edition by Kendall & Kendall, Prentice Hall ISBN-O- 13-145455-2. For any papers presented for this class, either the American Psychological Association (APA) style or the Modem Language Association (MLA) style will be the only writing styles accepted.





Supplemental Resources:
1. Structured Systems Development 2nd ed., Fraser Publishing. 19902001.
2. Systems Analysis and Design, Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. 1987.
3. Database Systems: Concepts. Languages. & Architectures, McGraw-Hill, 1999.

XXIII. ACADEMIC HONESTY:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101- "Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park."

XXIV. PLAGIARISM:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101 -"Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructor." Class participation is expected and will form part of the final grade for the course. Students are expected to come to all classes and to be on time. Students are expected to sign the attendance sheet at each class.

XXV. ATTENDANCE POLICY
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH". A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
(Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100)

XXVI. LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:
Homework problems will be assigned throughout the course. Homework is due at the beginning of class. Students cannot work on due homework during class. Homework problems collected will be graded. If for some reason, you are absent, or going to be absent, you must turn in your homework prior to the date due for homework. Homework will be graded for only those dates/times due. For any homework not submitted on time, grades will be reduced 5 points for each week late. After two (2) weeks of homework not submitted, the student will receive a grade of ZERO for that particular homework.

XXVII. COURSE ASSESSMENT:
The course will consist of Lectures, Class Discussions, Computer Lab Sessions, Computer Lab Assignments, Reports, Briefings, Weekly Homework Quizzes, Midterm and Final Exams, Term Paper combined with Presentation.

The student will:
a. Identify stakeholders and describe their roles and the individual needs in system development;
b. Understand the Information Systems professional and the user’s role in systems development in order to achieve user acceptance
and a solution that fits both the user’s needs and satisfies the business objective;
c. Identify problem/opportunity/directive, cause/effect and business requirements for a given problem scenario;
d. Differentiate between logical and physical models;
e. Describe duties of a Systems Analyst;
f. Build communications skills, both oral and written as well as develop teamwork skills.

Additionally, each student's homework must be typed (via word processor) and neat.

XXVIII. CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:
Understand that computers can cause problems as printers run-out of ink and hard drives crash. Students will ensure that work is properly saved on floppy drives or CDs for backup. Students should also make hard copies for backup purposes.

Each student will properly turn off computers and straighten chairs and desks before departing the classroom.

Additionally, each student will ensure that no trash is left on the desks, work areas, or floors before departing the classroom.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability

XXIX COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENT

DATE CHAPTER (S) TOPIC(s) STUDY ASSIGNMENT
20 Oct 2004(Week 1) 1 Assuming the role of the Systems Analyst – CASE Tool Read Chapters 1; Answer questions at end of Chapters 1
27 Oct 2004 (Week 2) 2 Organizational Style and its impact on I.S. Read Chapter 2; Answer questions at end of Chapter 2. Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 1 – !!!! Project Proposals DUE !!!!
3 Nov 2004 (Week 3) 3 MID-TERM REVIEW Determine Feasibility and Managing Analysis and Design Activities Read Chapter 3; Answer questions at end of Chapter 3. Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 2
10 Nov 2004 (Week 4) 4 MID-TERM EXAM Information Gathering: Interactive Methods Read Chapter 4; Answer questions at end of Lesson 4. Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 3
17 Nov Sept 2004 (Week 5) 5 Information Gathering: Unobtrusive Methods Read Chapter 5; Answer questions at end of Lesson 5.Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 4
24 Nov 2004 (Week 6) 6 Prototyping, RAD, and Extreme Programming Read Lessons 6; Answer questions at end of Lesson 6. Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 5
1 Dec 2004 (Week 7) 7 Using Data Flow Diagrams Read Chapters 7; Answer questions at end of Chapter 7. Student brief, Quiz, Workshop 6
8 Dec 2004 (Week 8) 8 – Final Exam Review Information Gathering: Interactive Methods Read Chapters 8; Answer questions at end of Chapter 8. Student brief, Quiz, and final exam review; PROJECT BRIEFS
15 Dec 2004 (Week 9) 9FINAL Exam Describing Process Specifications and Structured Design -- FINAL Exam Read Chapters 9; PROJECT BRIEFS - Final Exam.

METHOD PERCENT POINTS
Quizzes (5) (Collectively) 7.89% (20 pts each) 100
Brief & Class Participation (Collectively) 6.58% 100
Workshops (6) (Collectively) 19.74% (50 pts each) 300
Midterm Exam 22.89% 500
Final Exam 22.89% 500
Project 20% 500
***TOTAL*** 100% (rounded) 2000
XXX. GRADING PLAN
Each student will be assigned to a group for purposes of the project. Each member in the group will evaluate the participation/contribution of all group members. This will assist the instructor in evaluating groups members participation of lack there of. The project briefing/contents six quizzes, student brief/class participation, six workshops, a midterm exam, and a final exam will determine your course grade. Further details of student briefs and workshops will be covered in class. The relative weight of the course will be as follows:
Grade/Points
A = 90-100% 1800 - 2000
B = 80-89% 1600 - 1780
C = 70-79% 1400 - 1580
D = 60-69% 1200 - 1380
F = Less than 60% 1199 - Below

Making Up Final Examinations:
Only extraordinary circumstances warrant a student's being allowed to make up a missed final examination. It is the student's responsibility to contact the instructor before the scheduled exam or by the end of the first working day after the day of the missed exam to request permission to take a make-up exam. In the process of determining whether a make-up exam should be allowed, the burden of proof is on the student. The instructor has the right to request verification of any excuse offered by the student.

The student who is denied permission to take a make-up exam may appeal immediately to the Academic Director or Resident Center Administrator. The appeal must be made by the end of the first working day after the day of the denial. The appeal will be forwarded immediately to the Assistant Vice President for Extended Learning whose decision will be final.
EXTRA WORK WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FOR CREDIT!