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CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration
Johnson, Jerome


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration

Semester

S2B 2007 BL

Faculty

Johnson, Jerome

Title

Adjunct Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

BS, MA

Office Location

Classroom

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

915-525-1601

E-Mail

Jerome.Johnson@park.edu

djdj1055@aol.com

Semester Dates

Mar 19 to May 9

Class Days

-M-W---

Class Time

7:40 - 10:10 PM

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Schmalleger, Frank. (2007). Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century, 9th Ed.
Pearson Printice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, ISBN: 0-13-171950-5. 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:

To be discussed in class. On occasion the instructor will refer students to supplemental reading material, case studies, and current newspaper articles.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the history, nature, structure, and function of the criminal justice system in America, with comparisons to systems in other nations. Examinations of the various aspects of the administration of the justice systems, including law enforcement, courts, correctional agencies (including probation and parole), and including the increasing role of private entities in the system will be conducted. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

The facilitator's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, class discussion/participation, regarding current events in the news and in news articles.  The emphasis will be to challenge the adult learner to engage and explore a myriad of ideas and issues confronting the modern criminal justice system.
 
The instructor's approach to education is to emphasize and broaden the student's critical thinking skills and for the student to be able to articulate his or her ideas in written form and through public speaking. The instructor will use lectures, class discussions, group activities, and supplemental readings to facilitate learning. Student performance expectations:
 
1. The instructor assumes the student has read and understands the syllabus and expects the students to ask questions if any aspect of the course requirements is unclear.
 
2. Students are expected to demonstrate that they are meeting the course objectives by attending class, actively participating in class discussions, submitting all written work in a timely manner, prepared to discuss oral presentation by due date and being in class for all scheduled examinations.
 
3. Students are assigned readings from the required text in advance of each class meeting are are expected to be prepared for class.
 
4. Students are expected to ask questions if they do not understand something.
 
 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the use of basic vocabulary of criminal justice.
  2. Express a basic understanding of the American criminal justice system, its history, nature, and structure (including law enforcement, courts, and corrections) and how it functions, while examining the role of private entities in the CJ system.
  3. Compare the American criminal justice system with systems in other nations.
  4. Explain how the current issues such as juvenile justice, technology, terrorism, and drug use affect the criminal justice system.
  5. Discuss some aspect of a current issue in international criminal justice.
  6. Demonstrate the use of tools for gathering, retrieving, evaluating, and communicating information about criminal justice
  7. Express an appreciation for the diversity of value systems and their interconnection with their cultures.


Core Assessment:

You will be expected to write a paper containing three essays in CJ 100, Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration - one law enforcement, courts and corrections.  The essays may be collected all at once or at different times during the couse. 



An essay is a short work that treats a topic from an author's personal point of view, often taking into account subjective experiences and personal reflections upon them. 



In one part of the paper, you must report and reflect on an interview with a professional; in another you must observe an agency in action and report and reflect on the observation (a case in a courtroom, probation and parole clients reporting to their officer, ride alone in a police car), and in the third you must watch a movie and relate its contents to the course. The order of the interview, observation, or movie doesn't matter.  Thus, the first essay may be a movie about law enforcement. 



Each part of the paper should be two to three, computer-generated pages written in American Psychological Style (APA).  You can learn about this style from the Park University website. Late papers will not be accepted.  Students should use six sources (the activity, your text, and four others) for each essay, and they should tie their topic to the text.  



An essay is a well-structured (i.e., organized) presentation of your ideas about what you have read, observed, heard, seen.  It is presented in a way that is easy to follow and understand. 



An essay can have many purposes, but the basic structure is the same no matter what. You may be writing an essay to argue for a particular point of view or to explain the steps necessary to complete a task. You may begin with a topic sentence such as:



 



  • The ride along with the ABC police was not as exciting as I expected after watching many police shows on television.


  • I observed in the DEF courtroom and was surprised to realize that 30 cases processed in an hour


  • The character “Red” played by Morgan Freeman in the movie Shawshank Redemption was institutionalized by his long time in prison and this institutionalization related to the discussion in the text about the appropriateness of long prison sentences.


 To write an essay, follow a few simple steps:






·         Decide on your topic.



·         Prepare an outline or diagram of your ideas.



·         Write your thesis statement.



·         Write the body.



·         Write the main points.



·         Write the sub-points.



·         Elaborate on the sub-points.



·         Write the introduction.



·         Write the conclusion.



·         Add the finishing touches.



 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Each student is responsible for reading all chapter assignments and to be prepared to discuss chapter contents. Student essays will be orally presented to the class at a designated date/time, per our class schedule.  There will be two exams, one mid-term and one final core learning objective exam.  The presentation of the essays, class discussions, exams, and attendance will form the basis for your final grade.

Grading:

Mid-term exam @ 35%
Final core learning objective exam @ 35%
Presentation and term paper @ 20%
Class participation @ 10%
 
Total @ 100%
 
A  90-100
B  80-89
C  70-79
D  60-69
F  59 and below - failure
 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Work missed due to military absence must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment. Work missed because of any other absences or work turned in late will not be accepted.  It is your responsibility to meet deadlines and turn in completed work when it is due.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Academic honesty is required as per Park University policy.  All absences in excess of two, excused or unexcused will result in a letter grade deduction from your final score. Absences related to military duty will require leveling work as assigned by the instructor and the absences must be approved in advance.  Cell phones must be turned off or on manner mode during class. Students are expected to particpate in class discussions.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

3/19 Introduction, Class expectations, Administrative Issues, Term paper topics
3/21 Chapters 1 and 2
3/26 Chapters 3 and 4
3/28 Chapters 5 and 6, discussion
4/2 Chapters 6 and 7
4/4 Chapters 8 and 9
4/9 Chapters 10 and 11, review
4/11 Mid-term exam over chapters 1-11
4/16 Chapters 12 and 13, start presentations
4/18 Chapters 14 and 15, presentations
4/23 Chapters 16 and 17, presentations
4/25 Chapter 18, Presentations
4/30 Presentations, discussion
5/2 Presentations, discussion
5/7 Final core learning objective exam
5/9 Review of grades with students

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1 and 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Combines interview, observations , or watching of a movie (depending on the paper) with the text and four or more other sources into a consistent whole Combines interview, observations , or watching of a movie (depending on the paper) with the text and three other sources into a consistent whole Combines interview, observations , or watching of a movie (depending on the paper) with the text and less than three other sources into a confusing essay Combines interview, observations , or watching of a movie (depending on the paper) with a text but fails to use others sources and essay is unorganized 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1 and 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Analyzes key elements from all sources (the activity, text, and three sources) Analyzes and key elements from all five sources (the activity, text, and three sources) Mentions but does not utilize key elements from sources (the activity, text, and three sources) Doesn't recognize and/or use key elements from sources 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
2 and 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Appraises the sources into a congruous and thoughtful essay (thoughtful implies original thinking) Appraises the sources into a congruous essay Essay appraises limited sources into a suitable whole Evaluation is not present in the artifact 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
By using multiple (more than 8) words specific to the aspect of the profession (law enforcement, courts, corrections),  the artifact demonstrates an exceptional understanding of the terminology in an introductory CJ course By using many (about 8) words specific to the aspect of the profession (law enforcement, courts, corrections),  the artifact demonstrates the expected understanding of the terminology By using less only a few (5) words specific to the aspect of the profession (law enforcement, courts, corrections),  the artifact demonstrates less understanding than expected By not using words specific to the aspect of the profession (law enforcement, courts, corrections),  the artifact fails to demonstrate an understanding of the terminology in a CJ 100 course 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2 and 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
By discussing multiple (more than 5) key ideas in law enforcement, courts, or corrections, the essay demonstrates an exceptional understanding of key concepts By discussing many (about 5) key ideas in law enforcement, courts, or corrections, the essay demonstrates the expected understanding of key concepts By failing to discuss key ideas in law enforcement, courts, or corrections, the essay demonstrates a less then expected understanding of key concepts An artifact that fails to discuss key ideas in law enforcement, courts, or corrections is unsatisfactory 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2 and 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The essay shows multiple instances and exceptional understanding of  terminology and concepts throughout the paper An essay shows sufficient and satisfactory use of terminology and concepts throughout the paper An essay shows little and unsatisfactory use of terminology and concepts throughout the paper An essay fails to demonstrate an understanding of terminology and concepts 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The essay contains fewer than 5 errors in the APA writing convention and in the paper presentation (grammar, spelling, etc.) The essay contains 5 to 10 errors in the APA writing convention and in the paper presentation (grammar, spelling, etc.) The essay contains more than 10 errors in the APA writing convention and in the paper presentation (grammar, spelling, etc.) The essay contains so many errors in the APA writing convention and in the paper presentation (grammar, spelling, etc.) that it is difficult to read 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact contains less than 2 errors in the following paper components: cover sheet, body of essay, or reference page The artifact contains 2 to 3 errors in the following paper components: cover sheet, body of essay, or reference page The artifact contains more than 3 errors in the following paper components: cover sheet, body of essay, or reference page The artifact is missing some of the required components or they are inappropriately completed 

Copyright:

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Last Updated:2/16/2007 3:48:57 PM