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PS 222 Adult Development and Aging
Reed, Joseph Emel


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CoursePS 222 Adult Development and Aging
SemesterS1J2005
FacultyReed, Joseph Emel III
TitleAdjunct Faculty
Degrees/CertificatesMaster of Science Education with Urban Emphasis
Master of Science Management
Bachelor of Science Social Psychology
Daytime Phone816-881-3108
Other Phone816-921-2424
E-MailJoseph.Reed@park.edu
Semester DatesJan 10 thru March 6, 2005
Class Days----R--
Class Time5:30 - 9:50 PM
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Aging and Diversity,
                                                          An Active  Learning Experience  
                                                          Fried, Stephen B., Mehrotra, Chandra M.

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore


Course Description:
Focuses on the developmental tasks and psycho-social services during the adult years with special emphasis placed on the social psychology of aging.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
COURSE GOALS: Upon completion of this course, the student will:

have an increased awareness of elements of their own diversity; be able to identify, understand  and compare the major theoretical perspectives of adult development; be able to predict trends and analyze probable effects of societal changes as they interact with the family system.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: During this course students will: demonstrate knowledge of the different domains of adult development, specifically, biological, cognitive, social and emotional; demonstrate knowledge of theories associated with adult development; demonstrate a basic understanding of a variety of social issues associated with late adulthood.

Course Assessment:
COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students are responsible for reading assigned text prior to class.  Students will participate in all class discussions, and be prepared to engage in the class discussions, case studies, individual and group presentations and group activities.  Groups will be designated for various class activities and activities will vary throughout the course.  

CURRENT EVENTS:  Students will be required to present an oral report on any aspect of Adult Development and Aging weeks 2, 4, and 6. This will include turning in a one and one half page (minimum), typed, double-spaced synopsis of your report.  Information can be obtained from any source, ie: newspapers, magazines, internet, journals, etc.  Students are required to attach the source of the article to the report.



MINI-PROJECT PAPER:  This is a scholarly paper on a topic of your choice that is associated with aging. The paper should be a review of research and/or policies addressing that issue. You must include at least 3 references from professional journals or texts. In addition you may use references from the Internet (provided they are well referenced). I have provided you a list of possible topics. The project must be at least 5 pages, typed, double-spaced, using the font described in the Written Assignments section of this syllabus. Although I am not requiring you to use APA format, I will be grading you on proper grammar and misspelled words. As you are college students, I know that it is your desire to submit a well-written paper.

Possible Paper Topics
I am requiring you to focus your paper on issues associated with middle or late adulthood or the aging process.
• Alcoholism in the elderly population
• Alzheimer's disease
• Aging in America - or any country or society of   your choice
• AIDS in the older population (it is growing)
• Artistic accomplishments of older adults
• Being the child of older parents
• Career opportunities for older adults
• Child bearing in mid life (women are having babies in their 50s)
• Death & dying - Attitudes or some other aspect that is associated with older persons
• Depression in mid and/or later life
• Dietary issues pertinent to mid and later life
• Elder abuse (granny, grandpa bashing)
• Gender issues in mid or later life
• Grand-parenting
• Grandparents as primary caregivers of their grandchildren
• Family relationships in mid or later life - select a specific relationship (parent/child, etc.)
• Family violence in mid or later life
• Handicap(s) and the elderly
• Health issue - you can select any one that affects persons in mid or later life
• Housing issues associated with the older population
• Leisure activities for older adults
• Loss in mid- and/or later life - for example loss of an adult child
• Medicare (or medicaid in mid or later life)
• Mate selection the second time around (mid or later life)
• Marriage or remarriage in mid or later life
• Media portrayal of older persons (ads, films, TV, magazines, etc.)
• Medical problem(s) associated with aging (your choice)
• Menopause
• Nursing homes
• Nutrition and aging
• Osteoporosis
• Parenting: (1) adolescents (2) handicapped adult child (3) relations w/adult children
• Programs - Local, state, federal, etc. that addresses associated with the aging population
• Religious convictions in mid or later life
• Retirement
• Senility - or other mental disorders associated with aging
• Sexuality in mid and later life (yes older people still have sex!)
• Spousal abuse in mid or later life
• Suicide in mid or later life (did you know that elderly white males are at highest risk?)
• Widowhood
These are just suggestions. You can select another topic, not on the list, or you can write about a specific portion of a listed topic. In short - it is up to you. Select a topic that blows your hair back. You will be more highly motivated, and you will enjoy the process more. Please inform your instructor of your topic choice.


COMMUNITY PROJECT :  The Kansas City Metro community is home to many nursing homes, senior citizen centers, low-income senior citizen residential  and retirement facilities. Many of these facilities and agencies welcome visitors as a means for providing companionship for their senior citizens. Many of these centers have welcomed pet visits (dog and cat) as an enrichment activity for their patients. Many will pair residents with students in order to keep patients socialized and up on world events. Other nursing homes will do the same, and most all would welcome visitors to talk or read to their patients. Satisfactory completion of this project includes 12 hours of volunteer service plus completion of a 10-15 page “Life History Project”, as well as documenting your experiences (what you did, how it impacted you, what  you liked, what you did not like, etc.) as a volunteer. You will also need to provide verification of your service with a signature from a representative of the organization. Although I am not requiring you to use APA format, I will be grading you on proper grammar and misspelled words. As you are college students, I know that it is your desire to submit a well-written paper.

GUIDELINES FOR LIFE HISTORY PROJECT
This project option involves the student interviewing an older adult (OVER 65 YEARS OLD) with the questions listed below, and compiling the answers into a paper that integrates the information provided by the interviewee with concepts from the course in what is called a "Life History." The interview may be recorded on audiotape or videotape, or you may record the answers in written notes. You will not be asked to hand in this material but should save it in case of questions about your report.

Feel free to enhance your report with photos from the person's life (copies or scans are acceptable).

The following are instructions for completing this project:

1. The Interview
There are four major sections to the interview. Allow as much time as necessary for the interview, and during this time, try to get as much information as you can. In addition to including "facts" about the person's life, try to gain an understanding of how the person has reacted to certain events and occurrences. What have been the major challenges of this person's life and how has he or she coped with them? What historical events of significance influenced the person's life (e.g. the Depression, World War II, Sept 11th). Be sure to read the requirements for the report before beginning the interview so that you will focus on class concepts in your questions.

a. The developmental phases of the person's life from childhood through old age. Ascertain a chronological order of events in the person's life and an understanding of major life events or transition points.

b. Major areas of life including family, school, work, health (mental and physical), social relationships, religion, and leisure activities. For each phase of life inquire about these specific content areas.

c. The individual's reactions to these life phases and events. Find out how the interviewee felt about each period of life and its major events.

d. The individual's attitudes toward aging. Try to apply some of the concepts from the course related to identity to the individual's approach to development in the later years.

Suggested questions:
What changes in your physical functioning have affected your life the most?

What changes have you noticed in your vision or hearing, and how have these changes affected you?

Do you think your memory or ability to use your mind has changed, and if so how has this affected you?

How do you feel about the way that younger people treat you?

What do you regret most in your life?

What do you think has contributed most to your sense of wisdom?

Is there anything you've always wanted to do that you haven't done yet?

If you could be any age, what would it be?

How do you feel about getting older?

2. The Report

The report must be at least 10 pages, typed, double-spaced, using the font described in the Written Assignments section of this syllabus. It will be evaluated on the clarity of your presentation, selection of appropriate life history content, inclusion of relevant material from class, and discussion of the quality of the individual's adaptation to aging. The quality of your writing will also be assessed as part of your grade, elements graded are organization, grammar, syntax and spelling.

USING THE INFORMATION FROM THE INTERVIEW, ORGANIZE YOUR REPORT INTO THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND LABEL EACH SECTION. STICK TO THE PAGE GUIDELINES OR POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM THE TOTAL YOU RECEIVE FOR THE PAPER.

Part I (1-2 pages)
Briefly describe your interviewee's life chronologically, highlighting events of major importance (1-2 pages). This is a minor part of the paper and is intended to provide basic information about the individual.

Part II (7-8 pages)
Describe the circumstances, relationships, and events that have shaped this person's life. Include the interviewee's interests, ideas, and attitudes as they have changed over the years. In this part, you are expected to relate the events in this person's life to the seven (7) chapters covered in the text, including theories, or ideas, that you have learned about in class. Each chapter contains many concepts, and you are expected to use at least 2 concepts from each chapter. Underline each concept as you apply it to the individual's life. There must be a minimum of 14 concepts from the text described and illustrated (concepts must be terms or theories specific to the text).
If these instructions are not followed you will lose points from your paper.

Part III (1-2 pages)
Provide your reactions to having completed this life history report, focusing particularly on how your attitudes and feelings toward older adults and the aging process changed or were affected by completing this project.

Grading:
GRADING POLICY:  

Attendance/Class Participation, Quizzes       200 points   (25 pts for each session)

Weekly Reports              150 points (50 pts for each report)

Mini-Project Presentations              250 points

Community Service Hours              150 points (50 points for each session)

Community Project       250 points

                                                                  1000 – 900 = A 790 – 700 = C            

        890 – 800 =   B   690 – 600 =   D

        Below 600 = F


? GRADES
90% and above =        A
80% to 89% = B
70% to 79% = C
60% to 69% = D
Below 60% = F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:  Students are required to turn in all written assignments on time and will not be given full credit if not. All written assignments will be done in no more than 12 pitch Times New Roman font, with no more than one inch

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
CLASS ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is expected at all classes, and absences will be a strong consideration in the calculation of course grades. In the event of  two (2) consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of an “F”.  Unexcused absences means the student not notifying the instructor in advance that he/she would not be in class.  Attendance will be taken at least twice per class session.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
WEEK 1 – 1/13 Introductions and review of class meetings, attendance policies, class assignments, and course expectations.  
Review of grading policies, and course overview.
Chapter to be announced by instructor
Group Exercise/Video

WEEK 2 – 1/20 Current Events Presentations
Chapter to be announced by instructor
Group Exercise/Video


WEEK 3 – 1/27 Nursing Home Projects/No Class Meeting


WEEK 4 – 2/3 Current Events Presentations
Chapter to be announced by instructor
Group Exercise/Video

WEEK 5 – 2/10 Nursing Home Projects/No Class Meeting

WEEK 6 – 2/17 Current Events Presentations
Chapter to be announced by instructor
Group Exercise/Video

WEEK 7 – 2/24 Nursing Home Projects/No Class Meeting

WEEK 8 – 3/3 Community Project Presentations

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. <a href="http://www.park.edu/catalog">
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog</a> Page 101
Academic Honesty:  Academic honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Therefore, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers, or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.
o Plagiarism - the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one's own original work sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
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