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EDE 311 Children’s Literature for Early Childhood and Elementary Teachers
Greene, Judy Ann


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EDE 311 Children's Literature for Early Childhood and Elementary Teachers

Semester

SP 2007 HO

Faculty

Greene, Judy Ann

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

MA, Special Education
PC II Reading Specialist

Office Location

rm. 317 Copley

Office Hours

M/F = 8:30-10:30, T = 11:45-1:45, or by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6421

Other Phone

--

E-Mail

judy.greene@park.edu

--

Semester Dates

January 16-May 11

Class Days

-M---F-

Class Time

11:00 - 12:15 PM

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

 

Cullinan, B., & Galda L. (2006) Literature and the Child 6e. Thomson-Wadsworth: Belmont, CA

ISBN: 0-534-55544-6

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
A survey of traditional and modern literature best suited to children from early childhood through the elementary grades. An attempt is made to develop an appreciation for prose and poetry suitable for children of different ages. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

 

Teachers must be willing learners who embody what they hope to cultivate in their students—curiosity and joy of learning, courage to risk being wrong, ability to connect the classroom to the world around it as a desirable way to enrich and empower genuine mobility in personal, social, and professional life. Teachers must also have at heart, the understanding that little of value can be communicated without first establishing and maintaining a human, mutually respectful relationship. In other words, teachers must model what they ask of and expect from the students they teach, and they must enter the classroom with a disposition toward teaching-learning as an “us-we” instead of “me-them” effort.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Use available resources to access a wide variety of good literature for children. (Relevant MOSTEP Standard: 1.2.9) (Framework: Knowledge 4; Skills 18; Dispositions 9, 16)
  2. Critically discuss and evaluate literature for children by using theories, terminology and standards currently used by professionals who know the field of children's literature. (Relevant MOSTEP Standards: 1.2.1, 1.2.9) (Framework: Knowledge 4; Skills 8, 17, 18; Dispositions 2, 4, 6, 9, 16, 19)
  3. Develop instructional activities for engaging children with literature, and for using literature across school subject areas. (Relevant MOSTEP Standards: 1.2.1,1.2.4, 1.2.5) (Framework: Knowledge 6, 7, 8; Skills 11, 12, 13, 19; Dispositions 2, 4)
  4. Select children's literature that is appropriate in terms of children's developmental levels as well as their prior knowledge. (Relevant MOSTEP Standards: 1.2.2) (Framework: Knowledge 1, 2; Skills 5; Dispositions 1)
  5. Describe the possibilities for celebrating a diverse culture through children's literature; In addition, incorporate books representing many types of people within instruction. (Relevant MOSTEP Standard: 1.2.3, 1.2.4) (Framework: Knowledge 2, 8; Skills 5, 12; Dispositions 1, 3, 8)
  6. Effectively and confidently, present children's books to children and colleagues. (Relevant MOSTEP Standard: 1.2.7) (Framework: Knowledge 13; Skills 10, 11; Dispositions 23, 25)
  7. Collaborate with colleagues to share books, resources and ideas within the professional community. (Relevant MOSTEP Standard: 1.2.10) (Framework: Knowledge 5; Skills 7, 9 16; Dispositions 7, 9, 18, 19, 25)


Core Assessment:

Resource file of 100 annotations of children's books.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

 
  1. Reader Response Text Notes To be prepared for each class discussion and activities based on the course text, record your thoughts and/or feelings as you read the selected chapter for the class (see Schedule of Sessions, Topics, and Assignment Due Dates at the end of this syllabus). This is actually a strategy called Reader Response that you can use with your learners in the classroom. When you come across something that evokes an “Aha!” or “I didn’t know that!” or “That doesn’t seem right,” or “That reminds me of . . .,” “I really like this!” “I really don’t like this!” reaction, jot it down on a sticky note or pencil it in, in the margin if you plan on keeping the textbook. When we have our text chapter discussions, you will be ready to contribute your thoughts and feelings to enlarge the group’s schema and perspective. There are a total of 13 Reader Response Text Notes required. They must be visible in your text to earn credit. Students who do not have some form of notes for the chapter being discussed that night will receive a score of 0 for this assignment.

 

  1. Read Aloud Presentation  This will be a live reading to the class of a book that you have selected and read. This is another strategy that you can use in your classroom with your learners. Your Read Aloud for this class should incorporate the elements discussed in class based on the text for an expressive and engaging presentation. Therefore, it should be practiced before presenting it to the class as it will be graded on a scoring guide by the instructor and included as part of the final grade. Fellow students will also score your presentation as an exercise in developing their own skills for conducting Read Alouds. You will be provided with a Post-Session Reflection Sheet (PSRS) that you will fill out after your Read Aloud Presentation and submit it to the instructor at the beginning of the next scheduled class session.

 

  1. CHILDREN’S BOOK Write your own children’s book that can be used to amuse, inspire,

engage curiosity, teach something, and/or that speaks to children’s feelings and perceptions. Your book should be appropriate for the age group of your education program degree. It must mimic children’s literature books by including the following:

 

(a)     a sturdy, durable cover with the title and an illustration that could be used for children to make guesses about what is in the book

(b)    a title page including the author’s name with another, smaller, illustration, and the date of “publication”

(c)     at least 5 front and back pages (total of 10 actual book content pages) for ECE students; at least 8 front and back pages (total of 16 actual book content pages) for EDE students. ECE books may entirely consist of illustrations that directly relate to the title, or they may contain text that is appropriate to their preferred age group.    EDE books must have a ratio of illustrations to text suited to their preferred age group. All students should use the books in their Children’s Literature Resource File as models. All book content pages must be able to weather frequent use and be firmly attached to the front and back covers.

(d)    A sturdy, durable back cover with or without an illustration.

 

  1. Lesson Plan  Students are to read their Children’s Book, then use it to develop and present a lesson plan to the class. A formal lesson plan will need to be followed. The teacher will provide this. Each lesson plan must include:

 

(a)     A full bibliography for the book at the top of the written lesson plan.

(b)    A live reading of all or a key excerpt from the book according to the Read Aloud standards for engaging the audience.

(c)     Accommodations and/or adaptations for children with special needs in the regular classroom. There must be 2 identified types of special needs, and 3 possible accommodations or adaptations for each of the 2 needs.

(d)    A relatively short activity that relates to the book. There is a wide range of possibilities, but the activity should incorporate the following:

                                                              i.      Allow learners to express themselves creatively

                                                            ii.      Help learners understand the diversity in our society

                                                          iii.      Build knowledge and skills in at least at least one modality from each of the three types of literacy: text (reading and writing), oral (speaking and listening), and visual (viewing and visual representation). E.g., lesson activity calls for learners to read, listen, and look at illustrations in such a way that learners can develop or strengthen their literacy skills.

 

Each lesson plan presentation should be between 15 and 20 minutes long. Students will present their lessons as they would in front of their future learners in their classrooms. After class on the day of your presentation, you are to fill out a Post-Session Reflection Sheet (PSRS) and submit it at the beginning of the next scheduled class session as you did with the Read Aloud assignment. 

 

5. I Know That I Know Notebook (IKTIKN): Students will collect course materials and assignments he or she feels will be useful for their future classrooms, and organize them in a binder so they can serve as a resource for future needs.   This is essentially the same thing as a resource notebook. The binder must (a) be labeled on the front and side identifying the contents, have (b) table of contents, listing sections according to students' preferences, and, (c) have each section clearly labeled & tabbed. Students are to bring their notebooks on the last day of class to receive points. 

 

6.    Children’s Literature Resource File (CORE ASSESSMENT): All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Departmental Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.

 

The Children’s Literature Resource File consists of brief but focused annotations for 100 children’s books that you have read this semester. Each annotation should include the following:

a.        Full bibliography for each book

b.       Genre it may be categorized under (note: not all libraries or bookstores correctly categorize their books, so use your own judgement instead of depending on theirs)

c.        Age level(s) for which the book is relevant & meaningful

d.       Awards it has received

e.        A one-sentence synopsis of the book

f.         Description of what you think are the 3 main strengths of the book

g.       Description, if any, of a potential problem or challenge the book may present to teachers, parents, children, administrators

h.       A minimum of 3 uses for the book

 

You may keep your file on the note cards and store them in a file or on paper and keep them in a notebook. You may use technology. You will most likely use at least parts of this file as portfolio artifacts for the departmental portfolio are you working on, so you may use the computer to create the annotations. It is important that each annotation is done carefully, neatly, and in order as described above. 

 

NOTE: There must be a table of contents and an explanation of how the annotations are organized.

 

Since many people use their Children’s Resource File in their classrooms, the file should be easy to use and organized. Therefore, the file should be clearly labeled on the top and all sides. You will notice on the schedule that there are dates for “progress checks” on the Resource Files. This is to help you avoid procrastination, to give you feedback as to your progress, and to insure fairness and consistency in evaluating them.

 

Book Genres & Distribution of Annotations for Children’s Literature Resource File To insure that your file represents a wide range of genres to meet a wide range of learners’ interests, needs, and skills, use the list below to gather your annotations.

 

                        Traditional literature/folklore              15

                        Poetry                                                  15

                        Modern Fantasy/Science fiction           15

                        Realistic Fiction                                   15

                        Historical Fiction                                 15

                        Nonfiction Biography                           15

                        Genre of your choice                            10

           

NOTE: Annotations for books you chose should be labeled according to their

genre (“Choice,” “My Choice,” are not genres.)

           

            You do not need to organize the genres in particular order; however, it should be a system that you find easy to use and maintain. Some students choose to go genre by genre. Others prefer to alphabetize by title or genre. 

 

            You may count a book only once in your annotations toward 100 entries, even if it fits more than one category. Follow the Core Assessment Rubric for you annotations in addition to the list of items a-g above.

            At least ¼ of your books (excluding picture books and poetry) should be longer books for older children (7-12 years of age). In fiction, these are often called “chapter books.” Make time to read some longer books. If your true interest is in grades 4-6, you probably need larger proportions of such books. You want to be able to use this resource in your classroom one day, so think ahead to what would benefit you and your learners the most. If you decide to read a majority of longer books and are having a problem reading the number needed, see the instructor for ideas of ways to preview a book without reading every word.

 

Look for examples of good children’s literature. Avoid what is called “grocery store books.” These are the kinds of books that you buy at a supermarket or discount store for a couple of dollars or less. Examples might be the Little Golden Book series, Walt Disney books, R.L. Stine, etc. Be careful with series books. Some are fine, but others are the equivalent of “pulp” romances (e.g., Babysitters’ Club, Goose Bumps, Berenstain Bears). If in doubt, consult a librarian, a classroom teacher, or the instructor for this course. However, even in libraries you will sometimes see this kind of substandard or commercial (designed to appeal for impulse buying or to hype movies and merchandise) books for children. The Cullinan text has an excellent bibliography if you need help. The instructor can also provide you with other sources for bibliographies of quality. It is imperative that you select quality literature and not books to simply fill your file. You are not putting this together merely for the instructor and a grade; this is to prepare you to be ready for your learners when you are in your first classroom. You will not want to support more of the sensational, easy, shallow type of entertainment aimed at making a few people extremely wealthy! You will want literature to inspire, delight, provoke thought, etc., in your learners.

 

CORE RUBRIC: A Core Rubric for the Children’s Literature Resource File will be given to you to help you develop your file.

Grading:

 

Points for final grade are earned as follows: 

 

Assignment                                                            Points                                      

Reader Response Text Notes (13 @ 5 pts each)                        65

Read Aloud Presentation                                                           50

Post-Session Reflection Sheet                                      10

Children’s Book                                                                        70

Lesson Plan                                                                               75

            Post-Session Reflection Sheet                                      10

I Know That I Know Notebook                                                   15

Children’s Literature Resource File                                         

            1st check (35-45 books/annotations)–                          35

            2nd check (65-75 books/annotations)                              35

            3rd check (100 or more books/annotations)                 35     

                                                               TOTAL POINTS:       400

 

 

A = 375 – 400 points     

B = 355 - 374

C = 335 - 354

D = 315 – 334

F = 315 points or less

 

 

NOTE: final grades are calculated by points only, not percentage.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

 

o       Assignments should be submitted on time even if student is absent (excepting emergencies). Use fax, email, ask fellow class member and/or friend to deliver to instructor’s mailbox, rm. 309 on the third floor of Copley Hall, or to box on instructor's office door.

 

o       Unless circumstances qualify for emergency absence, the following assignments will lose 5 points per day late: Reader Response Text Notes, Children’s Literature Resource File, and both Post-Session Reflection Sheets. All other assignments (Read Aloud Presentation, Children’s Book, Lesson Plan, and I Know That I Know Notebook must be submitted on time or receive a score of 0.

 

o       Assignments submitted before or on their due dates listed in the Schedule of Sessions at the end of this syllabus may be revised for more points until the last scheduled class session before finals week. 

 

§         Any assignment submitted after the due date will not be eligible for revision unless it is, due to circumstances that meet criteria for excused absence, including documentation.

§         Assignments must be submitted in person to qualify for evaluation for points. The instructor will not print, evaluate, or score emailed assignments. The only purpose for emailing assignments is to establish submission date & time.

§         If computer/technology accessibility or problems interfere with meeting a due date, an assignment may be emailed by midnight of the day it is due to establish on-time submission. A hard copy must still be submitted to the instructor to qualify for evaluation for points.

§        Each time an assignment is submitted for re-evaluation, it must include all previous drafts and rubric scoring/written feedback from the instructor. This is to support consistency and fairness in grading. Any revised assignment that does not have previous draft(s) and feedback will be returned to the student until it is accompanied by previous drafts & instructor’s rubric/feedback. 

 

General Directions for Assignments

 

o       Students are responsible for reading and understanding this syllabus, rubrics and other course materials in eCompanion to know what assignments are required, when they are due, how to do them, how they are scored, and any other pertinent information. Points have been deducted because failed to follow syllabus directions and/or study the rubrics in eCompanion. 

 

o       Some course materials for this syllabus (rubrics, directions, handouts, etc.) will be provided for students to download and print from eCompanion. (NOTE: before printing, adjust the font size to avoid overlarge type and excessive amounts of pages!) 

 

o       Questions and/or concerns regarding assignments will be handled before or after class, during breaks, during office hours, by appointment, or by phone or email. If a question or concern is raised that the instructor deems important for the entire class, the instructor will inform the class via email. Ideas for improvement are most welcome! A significant portion of this course is the result of previous students' creative and helpful ideas.

 

Written AssignmentsClear written and spoken communication is absolutely essential and expected for future classroom teachers. We are all models of literacy to our learners. The way learners see us use our literacy skills is what they will believe is correct and right for their own writing and speaking. Therefore, all written and spoken communication will be subject to correction for basic Standard English. (This includes the instructor--to err is human!)  

 

Students are expected to: 

(1)                           Use correct, standard English technical writing skills (i.e., grammar, usage, and "mechanics"--spelling, punctuation, grammar, capitalization, sentence structure, etc.);

(2)                           Proofread carefully for technical skills errors, missing words, missing letters, making all necessary revisions;

(3)                           Make certain terms and phrases are used correctly for meaning. 

 

All assignments containing basic writing errors will be returned for correction and points toward a grade will be withheld until the errors have been corrected. 

 

Any student needing help with particularly stubborn errors of basic writing skills will be referred to the Student Assistance Center if the instructor and student are unable to find time to work together. 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

 

Students are to demonstrate the same dispositions, behavior, and responsibility they would expect from learners and peers in their own classrooms. Therefore, the following will apply to all students enrolled in this course:

 

·        Email is essential to this course. All students will need to check their PirateMail on a regular basis--at least twice a week. Typically, several days may pass when no email is sent, only to be followed by several emails in one day. Students are to notify the instructor as soon as possible if they have difficulty accessing their PirateMail accounts. Students who do not regularly check email run the risk of losing points on assignments, misunderstanding important information, not having materials needed for an activity or assignment, etc.

 

  • Key moments can be sabotaged by cell phones, text messaging, and doing homework assignments. Making, receiving phone calls, text messaging, and/or working on a homework assignment during class is rude to fellow class members, and disrespectful to the instructor; therefore, you will be asked to turn off the devices/stop the homework or leave class.

 

  • Completing assignments for this course or working on assignments for another course will also not be tolerated in class. This shows Students who choose to disrespect their fellow students and the instructor by

 

  • Speak and we will listen—with respect, from everyone. Students should also exhibit polite consideration when speaking as they would at their assigned school sites.

 

  • Computers can make it easier to do assignments; however, students must recognize that technology can also cause problems--printers run out of ink, hard drives crash.   Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

 

  • Professional demeanor & dispositions are essential evidence that students are ready to be classroom teachers--passing grades on assignments are not sufficient. The Professional Teaching Dispositions will be presented to students on the first day of class. The instructor will go over the dispositions with students at that time. Students will be evaluated by the instructor on all teaching dispositions. The purpose of this is to give feedback to students to help them reflect upon and develop the degree and depth of the attitudes and behaviors expected of outstanding educators.   Overall demeanor & dispositions will be confronted that do not meet expectations as described above.

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

 

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

1

F

Jan 196

? TOPIC: Introductions: people, course, procedures, policies, dispositions, syllabus overview

                (students read on their own, then come to 2nd session w/questions), find one or

                more children’s libraries to work with this semester

 

2

M

Jan 22

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: What is literature? What is a genre? Compare & contrast early childhood, children’s,

               & YA literature

? TOPIC: Self-assign Read Aloud & Lesson Plan presentation dates

 

3

F

Jan 26

? TOPIC: Preview textbook & resources (check out Teaching Ideas as resource for Children Bk

                also, refer to ch. 13 as resource for Read Aloud, Children’s Book & Lesson Plan.)

? TOPIC/ACTIVITY: Reading Aloud—pgs. 328-330 in Cullinan (read & discuss to prepare for

                                Read Aloud assignment

? TOPIC: Socratic Seminar

 

4

M

Jan 29

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 1 & Appendix E—Children’s & Adolescent Literature

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 1 & Appendix E (counts as 2 Text Notes)

 

5

F

Feb 2

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 1 & Appendix E—Children’s & Adolescent Literature

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

 

6

M

Feb 5

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 2—Art of Picture Books

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 2

 

7

F

Feb 9

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 2— Art of Picture Books

? DUE: Read Aloud Presentations 

 

8

M

Feb 12

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 3—Content of Picture Books

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 3

? DUE: Read Aloud Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Read Aloud on Feb. 9

 

9

F

Feb 16

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 3— Content of Picture Books

? DUE: Read Aloud Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Read Aloud on Feb. 12

 

10

M

Feb 19

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 4—Poetry & Verse

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 4

? DUE: Read Aloud Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Read Aloud on Feb. 16

11

F

Feb 23

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 4—Poetry & Verse

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Read Aloud on Feb. 19

 

12

M

Feb 26

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 4—Poetry & Verse

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

 

 

13

F

Mar 2

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 5—Folklore

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 5

? DUE: Children’s Literature Resource File, Check #1 (35-45) Files will be collected!

 

14

M

Mar 5

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC/ACTIVITY: Lesson Plan Assignment (discussion, questions, start in class—partners,

                               feedback)

 

15

F

Mar 9

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 5—Folklore

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? TOPIC/ACTIVITY: Lesson Plan Assignment (continue working on in class, feedback)

 

 

Week of March 12 -16: Spring Recess – Students will need to tutor/assist at assigned sites

 

16

M

Mar 19

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 6—Fantasy & Science Fiction

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 6

 

17

F

Mar 23

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 6—Fantasy & Science Fiction

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

 

18

M

Mar 26

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 7—Contemporary Realistic Fiction

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes on Ch. 7

 

19

F

Mar 30

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 7—Contemporary Realistic Fiction.

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

 

20

M

Apr 2

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 8—Historical Fiction

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes Ch. 8

 

21

F

Apr 6

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 9—Biography

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes Ch. 9

 

22

M

Apr 9

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 9—Biography

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: Resource File 2nd check (65-75) Collected TODAY

 

23

F

Apr 13

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 10—Nonfiction

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes Ch. 10

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 9

 

24

M

Apr 16

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 10—Nonfiction

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 13

 

25

F

Apr 20

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 11—Cultural Diversity

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes Ch. 11

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 16

 

26

M

Apr 23

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 11—Cultural Diversity

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 20

 

27

F

Apr 27

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 12—Developing Responsive Readers

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: Reader Response Text Notes Ch. 12

? DUEChildren’s Book/Lesson Plan Presentations 

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 23

 

28

M

Apr 30

? Advance Organizer (instructor reads children’s literature book)

? TOPIC: Text Ch. 12—Developing Responsive Readers

? ACTIVITY: Discussion

? DUE: PSRS for those who did Lesson Plan Presentation on April 27

? DUE: RESOURCE FILE DUE (100 or more) Files will be collected!

 

29

F

May 4

? TOPIC: TBUAN (to be used as needed)

? DUE: IKTIKN NOTEBOOK

 

 

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90
• Students may have no more than two (2) absences.
• A third absence will drop the final course grade by one letter grade.
• A fifth absence will drop the final course grade by two letter grades.
• It is considered standard professional courtesy for the student to notify the instructor by phone or email ahead of time of any and all absences or late arrival/early departures (excepting emergencies).  
• In the event of an absence from tutoring session, students are required to call and personally notify the cooperating teacher and, if possible, speak to the learner being tutored, apologizing for the absence.  Students must obtain the school and, if applicable, teacher phone numbers before beginning involvement as tutor.
• The following will be unconditionally excused and require documentation:  medical or dental emergency, student's hospitalization, serious illness of close family member, natural disasters (e.g., fires, flood, etc.), jury duty, unexpected military call-up, death in family.
• The following will not be considered for excused status in excess of the two absences allowed:  job schedule, wedding or other family event, other class schedule, and other situations that are avoidable by responsible planning.  If students are in doubt, ask the instructor first.  The instructor will uphold the policies set out in this syllabus.
• Late arrival and early departures of 15 minutes or more past the scheduled class starting and ending time each count ¼ of an absence.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
When appraising children's literature more than three strengths and well stated concerns  demonstrate insight of each book evaluation. When appraising children's literature three strengths and valid concerns will be sited for each book evaluation. When appraising children's literature less than three strengths, no concerns, or strengths/concerns are repetitious within the book evaluations. When appraising children's literature, strengths and concerns for evaluating children's books are lacking. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
When evaluating children's literature the student sites more than 5 uses for each selection and the uses vary in type. When evaluating children's literature the student has a minimum of  5 uses and develops variety in the uses for each selection. When evaluating children's literature the student has less than 5 uses and lacks variety in the uses for each selection. When evaluating children's literature the student does not note uses for each selection. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student demonstrates an understanding of a child's development intellectually and emotionally documenting specific information relating each literature selection to grade/age level  i.e. lesson ideas for different levels The student demonstrates an understanding of a child's development intellectually and emotionally identifying a reasonable and justified grade/age level for each selection. The student demonstrates a limited understanding of a child's development intellectually and emotionally identifying a grade/age level for each selection but each is not reasonable or justified. The student does not demonstrate an understanding of a child's development intellectually and emotionally lacking grade/age level for each selection. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student demonstrates an ability to formulate an organizational system for the resource file that shows considerable efforts including resources i.e. internet, author information, etc. The student demonstrates an ability to formulate an organizational system for the resource file that is classroom ready, easily accessible and flexible. The student does not have  a resource file that is classroom ready and its organization is poor and/or not accessible demonstrating a lack of understanding when formulating an organizational system. The student does not have a resource file that has any organization (i.e. selections are placed with no order in mind) demonstrating an inability to formulate an organizational system. 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The student inventories each resource selection with a unique presentation and a complete and consistent bibliography format.  The student's literature selections are from both current and classical literature focusing on a child's development intellectually and emotionally using a wide variety of topics and genres. The student inventories each resource selection with a complete and consistent bibliography format.  The student's literature selections are examples of quality literature with an understanding of genre and a wide variety of topics (30). The student inventories each selection with a mostly complete bibliography.  The student's literature selections are limited, genres are confused 20% or less of the time and the variety of topics is less that 30. The student inventories selections with missing key information in the bibliography.  The student's literature selections are weak/poor, genre selection is nonexistent and variety in topics is lacking. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student has examined, acquired and inventoried 110 or more selections (books) for the resource file having a wide variety of authors.  The selections are formatted(i.e. APA, MLA, etc)  with cross references ( i.e. genres, age/grade, themes) and excellent conventions (i.e. grammar, punctuation, etc.) The student has examined, acquired and inventoried 110-100 selections (books) for the resource file having a wide variety of authors (85).  The selections are formatted consistently (i.e. APA, MLA, etc) organized (i. e. genre, age/ grade, themes) and care has been taken in conventions (i.e. grammar, punctuation, etc.) The student has examined, acquired and inventoried 99-90 selections (books).  The selections are inconsistent in format but organized in a manner that includes information (i.e. genre, grade/age, themes) and care has been considered but may be inconsistent in conventions (i.e. grammar, punctuation, etc.) The student has examined, acquired and inventoried fewer than 90 selections (books).  The selections are inconsistent in format and or organized lacking/missing information 
Disciplinary Competency:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP Indicator 1.2.7 The pre-service teacher models effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
___ models exceptional verbal/nonverbal communication skills (no errors) 1.2.7.1
___ documents an sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, and physical ability differences classroom communication and in responses to students' communications in each lesson/card. 1.2.7.2
____ documented multifaceted support and expansion of learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and other media. 1.2.7.3
____  always uses more than three media communication tools 1.2.7.4

 
___ models effective verbal/nonverbal communication skills. (errors are few and do not disrupt communication) 1.2.7.1
___ documents sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, or physical ability differences classroom communication or in responses to students' communications. 1.2.7.2
____  evidence of support and expansion of learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and other media. 1.2.7.3
___ uses three media communication tools 1.2.7.4
 
____  inconsistent in modeling effective verbal/nonverbal communication skills (errors disrupt communication) 1.2.7.1
____  Inferred sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, or physical ability differences classroom communication and in responses to students' communications. 1.2.7.2
____ unsubstanuated support and expansion of learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and other media. 1.2.7.3
____  uses at least two media communication tools 1.2.7.4 
____  does not model effective verbal/nonverbal communication skills (errors are frequent and many) 1.2.7.1
____ does not demonstrate sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, and physical ability differences classroom communication and in responses to students' communications.(biased information, i.e. favors girls) 1.2.7.2
____  does not support and expand learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and other media 1.2.7.3
____ uses only one media communication tools  1.2.7.4

 
Disciplinary Competency:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP Indicator: The pre-service teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually assesses the effects of choices and actions on others.  This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning for more students.                                                                                                                                                                                 
____ applies and includes a multifaceted  self-assessment and problem-solving strategies for reflecting on practice, their influences on students' growth and learning, and the complex interactions between them. 1.2.9.1  
____  uses a variety of documented resources available for professional development 1.2.9.2
____ practices and reflects upon professional ethical standards 1.2.9.3
 
____ applies a self-assessment and problem-solving strategy for reflecting on practice, their influences on students' growth and learning, and the complex interactions between them. 1.2.9.1  
____ uses a documented resource for professional development 1.2.9.2  
____ practices  professional ethical standards 1.2.9.3  
 
____  a self-assessment or problem-solving strategy for reflecting on practice is included, but their influences on students' growth and learning, and the complex interactions between them is not included.   1.2.9.1  
____ evidence of but no documentation of resources available for professional development inconsistently or on a limited basis 1.2.9.2
____  fails to practice one of the  professional ethical standards 1.2.9.3

 
____  does not apply a variety of self-assessment and problem-solving strategies for reflecting on practice, their influences on students' growth and learning, and the complex interactions between them. 1.2.9.1  
____  does not use resources available for professional development 1.2.9.2
____ Fails to practice two of the professional ethical standards  1.2.9.3

 

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Last Updated:1/22/2007 10:09:49 AM