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EDC 357 Family Involvement in Early Childhood Education
Svoboda-Chollet, Mary


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EDC 357 Family Involvement in Early Childhood Education

Semester

UMA 2007 HO

Faculty

Svoboda-Chollet, Mary

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

M.S., B.S.

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

(816) 759-4442

E-Mail

Mary.Svoboda-Chollet@pirate.park.edu

Mary.Svoboda-Chollet@mcckc.edu

Semester Dates

Maymester 2007

Class Days

May 14 – 25

Class Time

M-R 1:00 - 4:45 pm and Fridays 1:00 - 3:15 pm

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Gestwicki, C. (2007). Home, school, and community relations. 6th edition. New York: Thomson Delmar Learning.

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

    Required Readings on Reserve in Park University Library

Bowman, B. (2006). Resilience: Preparing children for school. In School Readiness and Social-

Emotional Development (pp/49-57). National Black Child Development Institute.

Brown-DuPaul, J., Keyes, T., & Segatti, L. (2001). Using documentation panels to communicate with families. Childhood Education, Summer, 209-213. (On reserve in library.)

Christian, L. G. (2006). Understanding families: Applying family systems theory to early childhood practice. Young Children 61 (1): 12-20.

Edmiaston, R., Dolezal, V., Doolittle, S., Erickson, C., & Merritt, S. (2000). Developing individualized education programs for children in inclusive settings: A developmentally appropriate framework. Young Children, 36-41.

Friedman, S. (2007). Coming together for children: Six community partnerships make a big difference. Young Children 62 (2): 34 – 41.

Grossman, S. (1999). Examining the origins of our beliefs about parents. Childhood Education, Fall, 24-27. (On reserve in library.)

Huntsinger, C. C., Huntsinger, P. R., Ching, W., & Lee, C. (2000). Understanding cultural contexts fosters sensitive caregiving of Chinese American children. Young Children, 7-15.

Kaiser, B., Rasminsky, J.S. (2003). Opening the Culture Door. Young Children, 53-56.

Martini, M. (2002). How mothers in four American cultural groups shape infant learning during mealtimes. Zero To Three, 14-20.

Okagaki, L., & Diamond, K. E. (2000). Responding to cultural and linguistic differences in the beliefs and practices of families with young children. Young Children, 74-79.

Olson, J., Murphy, C. L., & Olson, P. D. (1999). Readying parents and teachers for the inclusion of children with disabilities: A step-by-step process. Young Children, 18-22.

Simons, K. A., & Curtis, P. A. (2007). Connecting with communities: Four successful schools. Young Children 62 (2): 12 - 20.

Tabors, P. O. (1998). What early childhood educators need to know: Developing effective programs for linguistically and culturally diverse children and families. Young Children,  20-26.

Turbiville, V. P., Umbarger, G. T., & Guthrie, A. C. (2000). Fathers’ involvement in programs for young children. Young Children, 74-79.

Williams, K.C., Clooney, M.H. (2006). Young Children and Social Justice. Young Children, 75-82.

Young, D., Behounek, L.M. (2006). Kindergartners Use PowerPoint to Lead Their Own Parent-Teacher Conferences. Young Children, 24-26.

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Course Description:
A course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills  necessary to promote and support family involvement in early childhood  settings (including Infant/Toddler, Pre-K-Kindergarten, and Primary K-3).  Emphasis will be placed on learning to work effectively with families and  other adults from a variety of cultural/linguistic and socio-economic  backgrounds.   Prerequisite:  Admission to the School for Education..  3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze and evaluate different programmatic approaches to connecting home and school. (MoSTEP 1.2.10 EC 3.5 NAEYC 2c)
  2. Examine the role of cultural, socio-economic, and linguistic factors in home/school relationships. (MoSTEP 1.2.10 EC 3.2, 3.5 NAEYC 2c)
  3. Design strategies for working with families to develop goals for their children. (MoSTEP 1.2.10, EC 3.4 NAEYC 2c)
  4. Develop techniques for successful conferences, home visits, and use of family members as program volunteers. (MoSTEP 1.2.10 EC 3.4 NAEYC 2c)
  5. Analyze potential barriers in teacher/family communication. (MoSTEP 1.2.10, EC 3.2 NAEYC 2b)
  6. Formulate a working philosophy of family involvement in early childhood care and education. (MoSTEP 1.2.10 EC 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 NAEYC 2a, 2b, 2c)


Core Assessment:
Family Involvement Plan and Philosophy Statement

Class Assessment:
Site observations, interviews, presentations, projects, discussions, reflections, papers.

Grading:
  

 

GRADING POLICY: The course requirements are all assigned point values. Rubrics will be provided for each of the assignments. Students will earn grades on the basis of total points earned in the course. 

Becoming Aware of Cultural Bias 20pts.

Barriers to Effective Home/School Relationships 10 pts.

Communicating with Families: Beginning the Year 10 pts.

Communicating with Families: Child-Led Conferences 10pts.

Family Involvement Analysis/Plan and Philosophy Statement 50 pts.

  

A= 100 – 90 pts.   B= 89 – 80 pts.   C=79 – 70 pts.

All assignments must be turned in on time.

Late assignments will not be given full credit. 


Late Submission of Course Materials:
Assignments are due on the date listed. Learners must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of computer problems. Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
The Maymester session requires intensive reading, well-organized study, and active participation in class discussions.  Plan to attend all classes.  Each student will be an important part of the community of learners.  In order to participate effectively in class discussion, readings should be completed before each meeting.  Strategies for active reading and discussion will be demonstrated in class.  If you should have an emergency and are unable to attend, please be sure to call the instructor before the class meeting.  Attendance and effective participation will be considered in determining the final course grade. This includes each student taking an active part in the questioning processs, and participation of each site visit, as well as questioning and processing information of class speakers.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:


Long-Term Assignment:
Approaches to Family Involvement Analysis. Throughout the semester the class will visit programs serving young children and their families (birth through grade 3) to interview professionals (teachers, administrators, support staff) to learn about approaches to family involvement. As a group, we will develop questions and conduct interviews with the professionals. The final paper for this assignment will be an extended analysis of the programs including the role of 1) positive teacher attitudes; 2) strong leadership and support systems for family involvement; 3) sufficient and flexible communication time; 4) variety in the ways for families to be involved in the program/school, including significant decision-making; and 5) generous opportunities for a 2-way flow of information with all families. After carefully reviewing the course readings, you will use these criteria to make a detailed analysis of each of the programs visited by the class. (see rubric for complete description of the expectations). After completing the program analysis, conclude with a well-developed working philosophy of family involvement in which you reflect upon the development of your learnings through the semester.
Daily Assignments: (see schedule and rubrics)

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS AND TOPICS
All readings and assignments should be completed by the class meeting.
Introduction to Families
M/May 14
Create sample questions for professionals Readings: Gestwicki Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 4 Grossman, S. (1999). Examining the origins of our beliefs about parents. Childhood Education, Fall, 24-27. Kaiser, B., Rasminsky, J.S. (2003). Opening the Culture Door. Young Children, 53-56. Christian, L. G. (2006). Understanding families: Applying family systems theory to early partnerships make a big difference. Young Children 62 (2): 34 – 41. Simons, K. A., & Curtis, P. A. (2007). Connecting with communities: Four successful schools. Young Children 62 (2): 12 - 20. Friedman, S. (2007). Coming together for children: Six community partnerships make a big difference. Young Children 62 (2): 34 – 41.

Teacher-Family Partnerships
T/May 15
Field Site: Independence Head Start at Hanthorn School Readings: Gestwicki Chapter 5
Huntsinger, C. C., Huntsinger, P. R., Ching, W., & Lee, C. (2000). Understanding cultural contexts fosters sensitive caregiving of Chinese American children. Young Children, 7-15. Okagaki, L., & Diamond, K. E. (2000). Responding to cultural and linguistic differences in the beliefs and practices of families with young children. Young Children, 74-79. Tabors, P. O. (1998). What early childhood educators need to know: Developing effective programs for linguistically and culturally diverse children and families. Young Children, 20-26. Williams, K.C., Clooney, M.H. (2006). Young Children and Social Justice. Young Children, 75-82.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W/May 16
Review Gestwicki Chapter 5
Readings: Gestwicki Chapters 6, 7
Edmiaston, R., Dolezal, V., Doolittle, S., Erickson, C., & Merritt, S. (2000). Developing individualized education programs for children in inclusive settings: A developmentally appropriate framework. Young Children, 36-41. Olson, J., Murphy, C. L., & Olson, P. D. (1999). Readying parents and teachers for the inclusion of children with disabilities: A step-by-step process. Young Children, 18-22. Martini, M. (2002). How mothers in four American cultural groups shape infant learning during mealtimes. Zero To Three, 14-20. Assignment: Becoming Aware of Cultural Bias: Create a written/visual portrait of your family. Write a reflection on how your experiences as a child/parent influence your cultural identity and explore the ways these experiences might shape your beliefs and expectations about those in other groups. How might your experiences interact with those of a child or family from a different culture? Review each of the readings on reserve and consider how your own experiences and communication style may influence your interactions with families described in the articles. Conclude with a reflection on your learnings from this assignment and a discussion how these learnings will be important in your teaching. (This final portion of the assignment should be well developed. It is the most important part of the assignment.) (20 pts.)



Methods for Developing Partnerships
R/May 17 Readings: Gestwicki Chapters 8 and 9 Bowman, B. (2006). Resilience: Preparing children for school. In School Readiness and Social-Emotional Development (pp/49-57). National Black Child Development Institute.
Assignment: Barriers to Effective Home/School Relationships. Interview two different families whose children are currently in an early childhood setting (birth through grade 3). Do they recall negative experiences in their relationship with the teacher or program/school? Describe the experiences and points of view of the families. Then, using Chapter 6, analyze the barriers that might have been present. Conclude with a reflection on your learnings from this assignment and a discussion how these learnings will be important in your teaching. (This final portion of the assignment should be well developed. It is the most important part of the assignment.) (10 pts.)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F/May 18 Readings: Gestwicki Chapter 11 Assignment: Communicating With Families: Introduction to the Year. Create a booklet (or other form of communication) that will introduce children and families to their experiences in your room. Conclude with a reflection on your learnings from this assignment and a discussion how these learnings will be important in your teaching. (10 pts.)

Week 2 M/May 21 Field Site: Francis Child Development Institute Readings: Gestwicki Chapter 10 and 12
Brown-DuPaul, J., Keyes, T., & Segatti, L. (2001). Using documentation panels to communicate with famlies.
Childhood Education, Summer, 209-213.

Turbiville, V. P., Umbarger, G. T., & Guthrie, A. C. (2000). Fathers’ involvement in programs for young children. Young Children, 74-79.
Young, D., Behounek, L.M. (2006). Kindergartners Use PowerPoint to Lead Their Own Parent-Teacher Conferences. Young Children, 24-26. Due: Independence Head Start Program Review Assignment: Communicating With Families: Conferences. Create a booklet (or other form of communication) that effectively communicates to families the procedures and purpose of a family–centered conference. If you plan to teach in a K-3 classroom, create your booklet for child-led conferences. Conclude with a reflection on your learnings from this assignment and a discussion how these learnings will be important in your teaching, including “pitfalls to avoid.” (10 pts.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- T/May 22 Field Site: Prairie Point Elementary School Readings: Gestwicki Chapter 13

Making a Partnership Work
W/May 23 Readings: Gestwicki Chapters 14 and 15
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- R/May 24

 

Readings: Gestwicki Chapters 16 and 17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F /May 25 Readings: Gestwicki Chapter 18
Assignment: Family Involvement Plan and Philosophy Statement

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
Rubric for Reflecting on Cultural Bias

Rubric for Analysis of Family Involvement Programs

Rubric for Barriers to Effective Home/School Relationships

EDC 357 Rubric for Communicating With Families Assignments.doc

Focus on NAEYC Standard 2.doc

Maymester Field Sites

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:5/14/2007 10:57:44 PM