Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

HI 319 Russia in the 20th Century
Schneider-Hector, Dietmar


Course Number: History 319
Course Title: RUSSIA IN THE 20th Century
Instructor: Dr. D. Schneider
Term Dates: Fall I – 3 August-23 September 2004
Meeting Times: Tu/Th 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Center: Park University

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION:

History 319 is designed to provide an introductory survey of the history of the Soviet Union, from its antecedents in the tsarist period until the present day. The lectures and discussions will focus on some of the major historical issues concerning this time period, such as why the 1917 revolution took place, Stalin’s rise to power, the collectivization of agriculture, the Great Purges, Gorbachev’s reforms, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the new Commonwealth.

II. GOALS OF THE COURSE:

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of how and why Russian society and institutions developed. The course should also help the student to understand how the events of the past, in that nation and elsewhere, shaped the world of today and may affect the future.

III. LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After completion of this course the student will be able to:

- Define and discuss common historical and political terms relating to Russia, the USSR, and Communism.
- Define, describe, and make comparisons of the various cultures of Russia, and the Soviet Union.
- Evaluate the effects of 19th century Communism on Russia.
- Evaluate the impact of early 20th century International events on Russia.
- Analyze the 1905 and 1917 Russian revolutions.
- Discuss the 1917 Communist coup in Russia.
- Discuss the major social, economic, and political developments in the USSR.
- Compare and evaluate the situations in the U.S., the USSR, and the rest of the world, 1918-1990.
- Assess the impact of World War II on the USSR.
- Discuss the general developments in the USSR/Russia since WWII.
- Compare political, economic, and social trends in the USSR/Russia with the U.S. and other nations of the world.
- Understand current activities of Russia, at home and abroad.

IV. COURSE ARRANGEMENT:

This is a lecture and discussion course; therefore, note taking is a must. Tape recording is not allowed. Reading assignments and lectures constitute the questions for the examinations.

V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Students are required to read the assigned chapters and participate in class discussions when called upon by the instructor.




VI. COURSE TEXT:

The text for the course is M. K. Dziewanowski’s Russia in the Twentieth Century,
6th ed.

VII. SUPPLEMENTAL RESOURCES: None.

VIII. CLASS MEETING AND EXAMINATION SCHEDULE:

3 August INTRODUCTION
GEOGRAPHY
RUSSIA IN THE 19th CENTURY

5 August 1905 REVOLUTION AND AFTER
THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTIONARY TRADITION

10 August WORLD WAR I
THE 1917 REVOLUTIONS

12 August CIVIL WAR
THE FIRST STEPS OF THE NEW REGIME

17 August EXAMINATION #1

19 August NEP
THE STRUGGLE FOR POWER

24 August THE STALIN REVOLUTION

26 August THE STALIN REVOLUTION (continued)

31 August THE 1930’s; THE PURGES

2 September EXAMINATION #2

7 September FOREIGN POLICY UP TO WORLD WAR II

9 September WORLD WAR II
LATE STALINISM

14 September Soviet Post-War Expansion
KHRUSHCHEV

16 September BREZHNEV
GORBACHEV AND PERESTROIKA
AFTER GORBACHEV

21 September EXAMINATION #3 (FINAL EXAM)

23 September MAKE-UP EXAM

TENTATIVE TEST SCHEDULE:

I. 17 August Chapters 1-8
II. 2 September Chapters 9-15
III. 21 September Chapters 16-26

IX. CLASS POLICIES:

ATTENDANCE: It is expected. No points are awarded. The instructor may refuse admittance to any or all students who come late to class. Because this is a lecture driven class it is important for students to attend all class meetings. AFTER TWO UNEXCUSED ABSENCES YOUR FINAL GRADE WILL BE LOWERED ONE LETTER GRADE.

X. ACADEMIC HONESTY:

All class work must be your work. Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated. If academic dishonesty has occurred in any part of the course, the student(s) involved will normally be given an immediate grade of F and dropped from the course.

XI. GRADING POLICY:

EXAMINATIONS: There will be three examinations in this course: two examinations during the semester and a final examination. Each examination will count as
100 points.

COURSE GRADES:

A = 300-270 EXAMINATION VALUE: 100 pts each
B = 269-240
C = 239-210
D = 209-180
F = 179-000

MAKE-UP EXAMINATIONS: You are permitted to make-up only one test. Arrangements with the instructor must be accomplished before any make-up is administered. Questions are from assigned textbook readings only.

Any item in the syllabus is subject to change.