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CA 517 Exper Methods of Comm Research
Aitken, Joan Evelyn


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

Course

CA 517 Experimental Methods of Communication Research

Semester

F1P 2007 MC

Faculty

Dr. Joan E. Aitken

Title

Professor, Communication Arts

Degrees/Certificates

Ed.D. Higher Education/Communication
M.A. General Speech; M.A. Curriculum & Leadership
B.A. Communication Theory

Office Location

Copley 229  Virtual office hours by phone or chat function.

Office Hours

Onground classroom before and after class or by appointment.

Daytime Phone

816-584-6785 (office/message)

E-Mail

joan.aitken@park.edu

Web Page

http://onlineacademics.org/CA517/

Class Days

As scheduled.

Class Time

As scheduled.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Sumser, J.  (2001).  A guide to empirical research in communication:  Rules for looking.  Thousand Oaks:  Sage. 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES  CA 517

The course core assessment final due date is Week/Unit 6.  This provides an opportunity for the instructor to give detailed feedback and give time for the student to revise, if needed.  No late assignments accepted.  Students must submit the assignments on time by the original due date in order to have the option to revise and resubmit to improve the assignment grade.

 

PROGRAM GOALS FOR THIS COURSE:
1.  To develop the ability of students to read and interpret experimental research.
2.  To apply research skills to resolve organizational issues and improve decision-making.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES MEASURED BY CORE ASSESSMENT ASSIGNMENT
1.  Demonstrate cognitive skills that can lead to theory building.
a.  Identify a theory or foundational theories for testing, which may require the student to synthesize MA program learning to create an experimental research project grounded in communication theory.
b
Design a real or hypothetical experimental research project intended to resolve organizational issues or improve decision-making (e.g., measure, sampling procedures, test-retest procedures, statistical tests).
c.  Write an answerable research question or testable hypothesis, and operational definitions.
2.  Demonstrate technical and professional research and writing skills.
a.  Find, read, and analyze 20 relevant scholarly, peer-reviewed, research articles that using quantitative research--in communication arts or leadership studies--for inclusion in a survey of literature for the introduction.
b.  Follow standard organizational pattern for a substantive thesis or project proposal.  The proposal should contain, for example a title page (e.g., straightforward title, headings, pagination), abstract, rationale for research (need), communication theory underpinnings and survey of literature, method section, timeline, proposed product, presentation method defense), reference list (approximately 20 pages in total length).
c.  Use APA style correctly to write a formal experimental proposal.
d.  Give formal prospectus presentation (e.g., 15 minute PowerPoint with sound).
3.  Demonstrate professional disposition for ethical, scientific, and academic quality.
a.  Provide proposal by deadlines and revise for high quality.
b.  Cite every journal article in the reference list and lists every citation in the reference list.
c.  Provide sources credit to all ideas presented in the proposal introduction (review of literature).
d.  Approach each subject as an objective, social scientist.
e.  Demonstrate academic integrity in research and reporting process, which includes a plan for obtaining IRB approval for any research using human subjects.
4.  Demonstrate leadership skills by solving problems through collaboration.

a.  Work with others in research processes (e.g., planning, design, implementation, analysis, and theory building).
b.  Provide evidence that research was with other members of the course (face-to-face or via the Discuss/Post section).
c.  Completed steps to develop the research plan and implementation over time.


LEARNING OUTCOMES MEASURED BY READING PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES AND EXAMINATION OUTCOME
5.  Identify the role of experimental and quantitative research in communication studies, by reading and interpreting the nature of scientific inquiry, research design, problem solving, and prediction.
a.  Recognize principles, definitions, and jargon related to the quantitative research process (e.g., sampling, significance levels, and hypothesis testing).
b.  Identify parameters of research ethics in communication studies. 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES MEASURED BY COLLABORATIVE AND MINOR ASSIGNMENTS
6.  Apply research to communication and leadership principles and decision-making to a project about improving intercultural communication, motivation, research, or some other relevant communication and leadership topic(e.g., the protocol for an experimental study or other quantitative research designs).
a.  Identify, analyze, and evaluate problem formulation and hypothesis testing in the process of scientific research.
b.  Identify, analyze, and evaluate appropriate research design and notice design details.
c.  Identify, analyze, and evaluate use of measurement, observation, survey, and data collection in experimental or quantitative research.
 

A professor may add supplemental learning outcomes.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.

http://parkonline.org/

Course Description:
A study of the basic principles used to construct experimental designs, test hypotheses, and apply methods of behavioral science to communication. 

We will broaden our approach, however, to include various research designs in quantitative research with the objective of helping you effectively read quantitative journal articles and apply these principles to your research project or thesis proposal. You will learn about how to read research and use research to answer your questions.

Educational Philosophy:

Our course goal is for you to read and analyze experimental and other forms of quantitative research so that you can conduct a comprehensive survey of literature for your Master's thesis or project. We do not expect all our students to start from the same place.  We'll take a somewhat unique approach because students come from various backgrounds and a wide array of preparation--or lack of preparation--for this course.  We will focus on mastery of content as applied to reading experimental research articles and meeting the individual student's objectives for the Master's thesis or project.   For information about the thesis, see http://onlineacademics.org/CA797/
For information about the project, see http://onlineacademics.org/CA700/

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. Evaluate potential topics and select a topic appropriate for a thesis or research project.
  2. Synthesize program learning to create a thesis or research proposal.
  3. Follow organizational pattern for a thesis proposal.
  4. Identify the role of experimental and related research in communication studies, with emphasis on the nature of scientific inquire and research design.
Class Assessment:

Submit a hardcopy of your assignment at the beginning of the class meeting to receive a grade.  Remember, even a tentative draft is better than no assignment.  You need to turn in the assignment by the due date in order to have the option to revise for a higher grade.  Thanks.


Grade Weight

 

Course Home  - Collaborative Project

20%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 2 Core 2 20 References, Hypothesis, & Operational Definitions

5%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 3 Core 3 Hypothetical Experiment

5%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 4 Core 4 Draft of Literature Review

5%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 5 Core 5 Design & Measure

5%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 6 Core 6 Final Proposal

15%

 

Course Home  - Due Wk 8 Core 8 Revision, if needed. Extra Credit

* Extra Credit

 

Course Home  - Final Exam

10%

 

Course Home  - Motivational Story

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 1 In-class Participation Assignments

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 2 Part Assign

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 3 Part Assign

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 4 Part Assign

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 5 Part Assign

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 6 Part Assign

5%

 

Course Home  - Wk 7 Part Assign Extra Credit

* Extra Credit

 

Course Home  - Wk 8 Part Assign Extra Credit

* Extra Credit

 

Total

100%

 

Grading:

See http://onlineacademics.org/Guidelines.html#GRADING_&_ASSIGNMENTS0

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Assignments are due each week.  http://onlineacademics.org/Guidelines.html#BE_ON_TIME 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
http://onlineacademics.org/Guidelines.html

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week or Unit 1.  Examine the Map! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to IDENTIFY EFFECTIVE WRITING FOR RESEARCH USING COMMUNICATION THEORY.

Assignments

1.       Begin assignments due week two.

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).

3.       Decide on a research topic for a hypothetical experimental research proposal.  Find 20 quantitative, communication, peer- reviewed articles related to the topic, which you may want to analyze for the course. Use Communication and Mass Media Complete (EBSCO), http://www.park.edu/library/


Week or Unit 2.  Follow the Path! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to IDENTIFY THE NATURE OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY AND RESEARCH DESIGN.  The student will be able to IDENTIFY THE BASICS OF EXPERIMENTAL/QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH.

Assignments

Read Sumser chapter 1-3, 5, 7.

1.       DUE IN CLASS : For Core Project (Research Proposal):  Reference list of 20 quantitative, peer-reviewed research articles in communication and leadership. Use Communication and Mass Media Complete (EBSCO), click here. Hypothetical experimental research question or hypothesis and operational definitions.

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).


Week or Unit 3.  Get Your Feet Wet! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to IDENTIFY THE PRINCIPLES OF ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND MEASUREMENT.

Assignments

1.       DUE IN CLASS : Proposed hypothetical experiment outline.

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).


Week or Unit 4. Watch Your Step! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to APPLY APA STYLE AND SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES IN WRITING AN EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH PROPOSAL.

Assignment

1.       DUE IN CLASS : Rough draft of hypothetical experimental research proposal.

2.       Read Sumser, chapter 5.

3.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).


Week or Unit 5. Just Hard Work!
UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to ANALYZE HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN THE PROCESS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH.

Assignments

1.       DUE IN CLASS : Experimental design section and measure.

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).

3.       Read Sumser, chapters 6 & 8


Week or Unit 6. Stretch Yourself! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to IDENTIFY APPROPRIATE RESEARCH DESIGN AND NOTICE DESIGN DETAILS.  The student will be able to USE CRITICAL THINKING--ANALYSIS, EVALUATION--TO ANALYZE RESEARCH LITERATURE.

Assignments

1.       DUE IN CLASS : ABSOLUTE FINAL DEADLINE: CORE ASSESSMENT DUE IN CLASS (onground) OR SUNDAY BEFORE MIDNIGHT (online).

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat).

3.       You may want to work through a variety of self-check items to prepare for your final exam. Note the study guide.


Week or Unit 7. The Summit! UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to IDENTIFY USE OF MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND DATA COLLECTION IN EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH.

Assignment.

1.       Complete the final exam this week.

2.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat), as appropriate.


Week or Unit 8.  Heading Home UNIT LEARNING OUTCOME:  The student will be able to PRESENT A PROFESSIONAL-STYLE THESIS OR PROJECT PROPOSAL TO A GROUP.

Assignments

1.       DUE IN CLASS : Revision due in class if previously submitted by the week six due date.

2.       PRESENT your proposal to the rest of the class. 

3.       Participate in learning activities, whether onground or online (e.g., discussion board, chat), as appropriate.

4.       Review course materials and complete final exam, if you haven't done so.

5.       If you missed a minor assignment earlier, complete additional work or revision this week.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY is the foundation of the academic community.  Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  

Definitions

Academic dishonesty includes committing or the attempt to commit cheating, plagiarism, falsifying academic records, and other acts intentionally designed to provide unfair advantage to the students.

Cheating includes, but is not limited to, intentionally giving or receiving unauthorized aid or notes on examinations, papers, laboratory reports, exercises, projects, or class assignments which are intended to be individually completed.  Cheating also includes the unauthorized copying of tests or any other deceit or fraud related to the student's academic conduct.
Plagiarism involves the use of quotation without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignments (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Falsifying academic records includes, but is not limited to, altering grades or other academic records.
Other acts that constitute academic dishonesty include:
Stealing, manipulating, or interfering with an academic work of another student or faculty member.
Collusion with other students on work to be completed by one student.
Lying to or deceiving a faculty member.
Procedure

In the event of alleged academic dishonesty, an Academic Dishonesty Incident Report will be submitted to an Online Academic Director who will then investigate the charge.  Students who engage in academic dishonesty are subject to a range of disciplinary actions, from a failing grade on the assignment or activity in question to expulsion from Park University.  Park University's academic honesty policy and related procedures can be found in full in the Park University Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs.

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct. Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26


Please follow APA style, using citation for all paraphrased or quoted ideas.  Give a complete reference listing for the weekly journal analysis and each submission of the project/thesis proposal.

Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, in a 16-week semester (or 2, in an 8-week term) will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Dean, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 28
Onground students are expected to actively engage in class learning activities.

Online students are expected to log in to eCollege and actively engage multiple days/times each week.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

COURSE
INFORMATION MAY CHANGE DURING COURSE:  SEE WEBPAGE FOR UPDATES.
http://onlineacademics.org/CA517/






My General Expectations
for Professor and Students: http://onlineacademics.org/Guidelines.html


My APA Style and Writing Tutorial:  http://onlineacademics.org/APA.html

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and cannot be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:8/17/2007 10:56:28 AM