Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

ED 585 Emergent Literacy Diverse Soc I
Choi, Dong Hwa


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 585 Emergent Literacy Diverse Soc I

Semester

F1P 2007 ED

Faculty

Choi, Dong Hwa

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph. D

Office Location

Independence campus

Daytime Phone

816-584-6563

Other Phone

816-820-7950

E-Mail

dong.choi@park.edu

Semester Dates

August 20-October 13

Class Days

----R--

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Clay, M. M. (1998). By different paths to common outcomes. York:ME. Stenhouse.

Owocki, G., & Goodman, Y. (2002). Kidwatching: Documenting children’s literacy development.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (To be consulted throughout the 8-weeks)

E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.). Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
 

Readings:

Anning, A. (2003). Pathways to the Graphicacy Club: The crossroad of home and preschool. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 3, 5-35

               

Brooker, L. (2002). ‘Five on the first of December!’: What can we learn from case studies of early childhood literacy? Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 2,291-313.

 

Duke, N. K. (2000). For the rich, it’s richer: Print experiences and environments offered to children in very low- and very high –socio-economic status first-grade classrooms. American Educational Researcher Journal, 37, 441-478.

Durante, A., Ochs, E., & Ta’ase, E. K. (2004). Change and tradition in literacy instruction in a Samoan American community. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 159-170. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

Gregory, E., Long, S., & Volk, D. (2004). A sociocultural approach to learning. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 6-20. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

Haight, W. L., & Carter-Black, J. (2004). His eye on the sparrow: Teaching and learning in an African-American church. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 195-20. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

Handell, R. D., & Goldsmith, E. (1994). Family reading-still got it: Adults as learners, literacy resources, and actors in the world. In D. K. Dickinson (Ed.). Bridges to literacy: Children, families and schools (pp. 150-174). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

Kendrick, M., & McKay, R. (2004). Drawings as an alternative way of understanding young children’s constructions of literacy. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 109-128.

McNaughton, S. (2001). Co-constructing expertise: the development of parents’ and teachers’ ideas about literacy practices and the transition to school. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 40-58.

Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom. Theory into practice, 31, 132-41.

Neuman, S. B. (1999). Books make a difference: A study of access to literacy. Reading Research Quarterly, 34.

Tabors, P. O., Beals, D. E., & Weizman, Z. O. (2001). “You know what oxygen is?”: Learning new word at home. In D. K. Dickenson, & P. O. Tabors, (Eds.). pp.93-110. Beginning literacy with language: Young children learning at home and school. Brookes Publishing.

Taylor, D. (Ed.) Many families, many literacies: An international declaration of principles. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (selected writings)

Volk, D., & de Acosta, M. (2001). ‘Many differing ladders, many ways to climb…’: Literacy events in the bilingual classroom, homes, and community of three Puerto Rican kindergartners. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1,193-224

Wollman-Bonilla, J. E. (2001). Family involvement in early writing instruction. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 167-192.

 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
The first course in a two-course sequence that examines literacy development (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in young children and explores the implications for teaching practices (birth-grade 3). This course focuses on the sociocultural contexts of childhood literacy including the social worlds of the home, the community, and the classroom.

Educational Philosophy:
 

Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism. 

 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine and apply research on families and communities as contexts for literacy development.
  2. Analyze and apply the finding of studies of childhood literacy to teaching practice.
  3. Conduct in-depth literacy profiles of children.
  4. Identify the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that families provide for their children's learning.
  5. Advocate for literacy environments and experiences that help children and families see themselves as capable, competent, engaged members of literacy communities.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

Inquiry Project

Part I. Literacy Biography. Identify a child and conduct a 5-week in-depth study of the child’s literacy capabilities. Based upon your research, and the course readings, create a richly descriptive portrait of the child. The purpose of the literacy biography is to develop a well-informed understanding of the child as a member of her literacy communities – home, community, and school (both formal and informal aspects of the school environment). Finding will be reported weekly to your research group. NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5   Professional Tools 6.

Part II. Researching “Funds of Knowledge”. Using Luis Moll’s research on “hidden family resources,” conduct a mini-ethnography to discover the home and community resources of the child. Findings will be reported weekly to the class so that the group can develop deep understandings of the multiple kinds of knowledge and skills that families provide for their child’s learning and literacy development. The final written presentation of research should include a reflection on your learnings from this project and the implications for your teaching. NAEYC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Professional Tools 1, 4, 5, 7 

Part III. Communicating Your Findings. Develop a plan for sharing your findings with others, including families and colleagues. NAEYC Standard 5 Professional Tools 8, 9.

Grading:
 

100-90 = A 

Most work is in the “accomplished” range.   (no more than two areas “developing”)

 

80-79 = B

Most work is in the “developing” range. (no more than two areas “beginning”)

 

79-60 = C

Most work in the “beginning” range. 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

· All assignments should be typed. No handwritten assignment will be accepted.

· All assignments must be turned in on the dates indicated, unless date is changed by instructor.

· Late assignments will result in 20% reduction of the student’s point total for that assignment.

· When student submits assignments after due date, you will have one more opportunity to submit the assignments. You can submit the assignment one week after the due date. That means when we meet in class in the following week of the due date, you can submit the assignment. After the second opportunity is passed, I will NOT accept any late submission.

· Any absence does not excuse students’ responsibility to get assignments turned in on or before due day.

· Extreme emergency absences and/or due date situation will be handled case by case at the instructor’s discretion. Instructor’s decision is final. Keep instructor informed of any potential personal situations that might necessitate an absence. 

· The above procedures and calendar (given in class) for this course are tentative and subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances. I reserve the right and responsibility to evaluate the quality of your work. Completion of an assignment does not guarantee the awarding of all possible points.

· If a student is absent for any reason, the student is still responsible for the information discussed in class that day.

· For your own protection, always save a copy of any assignment you complete.

 

 must be turned in on time to receive full credit.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
   

Please reserve Tuesday evening for this class meeting, and arrange your day so that you are able to arrive at 5:00 and remain until 9:30. We will begin class promptly at 5:00, take breaks to keep our minds fresh, and plan for a variety of learning opportunities, including small group research work and large group conversations about class readings. You will be responsible for leading discussion on the readings, so be prepared to guide your colleagues through an in-depth examination of the content of each week’s readings, as well as make connections to readings from earlier class session.   This will mean that everyone needs to be well-prepared by carefully reading the selections for the week.

Please turn off all cell phones and reserve phone calls for breaks.

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Topic

Date

Assignments

Week 1:Making Meaning: Conceptualizing Literacy

8/23

Readings: 

           Clay, M. M. (1998). By different paths to common outcomes.    York:ME. Stenhouse.    Introduction and Chapters 1-2

Anning, A. (2003). Pathways to the Graphicacy Club: The crossroad of home and preschool. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 3, 5-35

Whitmore, K. F., Martens, P., Goodman, Y. M., Owocki, G. (2004). Critical lessons from the transactional perspective on early literacy research. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 291-325.

              

Week 2:Families andCommunitiesAs Contexts ofLiteracy Development

8/30

Readings:

            Gregory, E., Long, S., & Volk, D. (2004). A sociocultural approach to learning. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 6-20. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

            McNaughton, S. (2001). Co-constructing expertise: the development of parents’ and teachers’ ideas about literacy practices and the transition to school. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 40-58.

            Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom. Theory into practice, 31, 132-41.

Week 3:From the Child’s Perspective.

 

How Children Represent Their Knowledge.

9/6

Readings:

           Clay, M. M. (1998). By different paths to common outcomes.    York:ME. Stenhouse.    Chapters 3-4

           Kendrick, M., & McKay, R. (2004). Drawings as an alternative way of understanding young children’s constructions of literacy. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 4, 109-128.

Week 4: CommunitiesAs Contexts ofLiteracy Development: Language and Culture

9/13

Readings:

            Haight, W. L., & Carter-Black, J. (2004). His eye on the sparrow: Teaching and learning in an African-American church. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 195-20. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

           Volk, D., & de Acosta, M. (2001). ‘Many differing ladders, many ways to climb…’: Literacy events in the bilingual classroom, homes, and community of three Puerto Rican kindergartners. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1,193-224.

Week 5:

CommunitiesAs Contexts ofLiteracy Development: Language and Culture

 

9/20

Readings:         

           Brooker, L. (2002). ‘Five on the first of December!’: What can we learn from case studies of early childhood literacy? Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 2,291-313.

           Durante, A., Ochs, E., & Ta’ase, E. K. (2004). Change and tradition in literacy instruction in a Samoan American community. In E. Gregory, S. Long, & D. Volk (Eds.) pp. 159-170. Many pathways to literacy: Young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers and communities. NY: RoutledgeFalmer.

Week 6:

Families as Partners

 

9/27

Readings:

           Tabors, P. O., Beals, D. E., & Weizman, Z. O. (2001). “You know what oxygen is?”: Learning new word at home. In D. K. Dickenson, & P. O. Tabors, (Eds.). pp.93-110. Beginning literacy with language: Young children learning at home and school. Brookes Publishing.

           Wollman-Bonilla, J. E. (2001). Family involvement in early writing instruction. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 1, 167-192.

Week 7:

Families as Partners

 

10/4

Readings:

           Handell, R. D., & Goldsmith, E. (1994). Family reading-still got it: Adults as learners, literacy resources, and actors in the world. In D. K. Dickinson (Ed.) Bridges to literacy: Children, families and schools (pp. 150-174). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

            Taylor, D. (Ed.) Many families, many literacies: An international declaration of principles. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (selected writings) 

Week 8:

Access to literacy experiences and materials

 

10/11

Readings:

           Duke, N. K. (2000). For the rich, it’s richer: Print experiences and environments offered to children in very low- and very high–socio-economic status first-grade classrooms. American Educational Researcher Journal, 37,  441-478.

Neuman, S. B. (1999). Books make a difference: A study of access to literacy. Reading Research Quarterly, 34.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct. Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, in a 16-week semester (or 2, in an 8-week term) will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Dean, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 28

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:8/22/2007 9:27:43 AM