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Education Major Version

ED 608 Assessment
Ebright, Ladonna E.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 608 Assessment

Semester

F2P 2007 ED

Faculty

Ebright, Ladonna E.

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Bachelors: Park College, Masters: KU
Certification: Elementary Education K-8, Learning Disabilities, Behavior Disordered, Mentally Retarded, School Psychological Examiner, School Psychologist

Office Location

911 Main, Suite 903, Kansas City, MO 64106

Office Hours

By appointment for Metro or Park home campus

Daytime Phone

(816) 842-6182 x 5532

Other Phone

Cell: (816) 210-4958

E-Mail

LaDonna.Ebright@park.edu

Semester Dates

October 22-December 14, 2007

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Prerequisites

Undergraduate Degree

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

 
Popham, W. James (2006) Assessment for Educational Leaders. Boston, MA. Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN 0205424007
 
Chidsey, R. & Steege, M. (2005). Response to Intervention Principles and Strategies for Effective Practice. NY, Guilford Press. ISBN 1-59385-215-0

Additional Resources:
 

Banks, Steven R. (2005). Classroom Assessment Issues and Practices. New York, Pearson

Barton, Linda G. (1997). Quick Flip Questions for Critical Thinking. Edupress, Highsmith Inc.

Chappuis, Jan (November 2005). Helping Students Understand Assessment, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 39-43

Culham, Ruth (2006). 100 Trait-Specific Comments, A quick guide for giving constructive feedback on student writing. New York, Scholastic, Inc.

Haggart, William (2002). A Guide to the Kaleidoscope Profile: Interpreting your Styles. Arlington, TX, Performance Learning Systems, Publications Division

http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/unitindex.html, Curriculum, Assessment, National Assessment of Educational Progress. And Gifted Programs

Marzano, Robert J. (2000). Transforming Classroom Grading. Alexandria, Virginia, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

McTighe, J. & O’Connor, K, (November 2005) Seven Practices for Effective Learning. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 10-17

Niguidula, David (November 2005). Documenting Learning with Digital Portfolios. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 44-47

Popham, W. James (September, 2004). Why Assessment Illiteracy is Professional Suicide. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 62 (1), 82-83

Sattler, Jerome M. (1992). Assessment of Children, Revised and Updated Third Edition. San         Diego. Jerome M. Sattler Publisher, Inc.

Stiggins, Rick (May 2007). Assessment Through the Student’s Eyes. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 64 (8), 22-26

Tomlinson, Carol Ann. (2003). Instructional Strategies for the Differentiated Classroom, (Complex InstructionVideo 4 and Facilitator’s Guide) (Available from Association for Supervision and Development, Alexandria Virginia)

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
A study of qualitative and quantitative tests and measurements including naturalistic, case study, and longitudinal methods of assessment.  This course is designed to address issues relating to formal and informal assessment, teacher-made tests, authentic assessment, as well as standardized tests.  Emphasis will be on tests utilized in Missouri. 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will practice the use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner
  2. Analyze educational assessment from various perspectives including the classroom teacher, students and parents.
  3. Practice using a variety of assessment tools utilizing formal and informal assessment measures
  4. Evaluate the quality of various assessment tools utilizing nationally recognized standards including but not limited to validity, reliability, and absence of bias. Practice professional and ethical standards.
  5. Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments
  6. Describe and utilize the foundational statistical concepts of central tendency and dispersion.
  7. Explain the implementation, interpretation and utilization of norm referenced, group achievement and aptitude tests including the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)
  8. Communicate assessment results to students, parents, and peers
  9. Utilize assessment results to inform classroom instruction for a diverse student population
  10. Explain the professional (legal and ethical) responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment
  11. Practice theories and applications of technology in educational settings and have adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

1. Students will practice and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.2; NCATE1; ISLLC 1,2; NBPTS 1,2,4 Core #1
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 3f ,  Skills   2b,  Dispositions 2e
  • Assessments: Classroom projects, Classroom discussion, Quizzes, Case studies

2.Analyze educational assessment from various perspectives including the classroom teacher, students and parents.

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.4; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2,4; NBPTS 3, 4. Core #3
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge 2c, Skills 1g, 2c,  Dispositions 2e
  • Assessments: Role play, classroom discussion, quizzes Interpretation of Standardized Tests.

3. Practice a variety of assessment tools utilizing formal and informal assessment measures

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.1; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2; NBPTS 3 Core #3
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge   2c, Skills 1g, 2c , Dispositions 2c
  • Assessment: Classroom demonstration of various standardized assessment tools, construction of informal assessment measures.

4. Evaluate the quality of various assessment tools utilizing nationally recognized standards including but not limited to validity, reliability and absence of bias.

  • MoSTEP 1.2.9.3; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2; NBPTS 3; Core # 3
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge 2c, Skills 2a, 2c, Dispositions 4d
  • Classroom demonstration of various standardized assessment tools, construction of informal assessment measures.
  • Assessment: Oral and written presentation of research found on various assessment tools, classroom discussion and review of professional standards for evaluation.

5.Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments.

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.1; NCATE 1; ISLLA 2; NBPTS 3, Core # 3
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge 2c, Skills 1g, 2c,  Dispositions 2e
  • Assessment: Construction of a variety of classroom assessments such as an informal reading inventory, use of rubrics, use of portfolios, etc.

6. Describe and utilize the foundational statistical concepts of central tendency and dispersion.

  • MoSTEP 1.1.1; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2; NBPTS 3, Core #2
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge    1a
  • Assessment: Case reviews, quizzes, classroom discussions

7.Explain the implementation, interpretation and utilization of norm, referenced, group achievement and aptitude tests including the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)

·        MoSTEP 1.2.8.2; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2; NBPTS 3, Core #5

·        School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge 2e, Skills 3c, Dispositions 3g

·        Assessment: Review of educational journal articles (oral and written) classroom discussions, class projects (i.e. given a class or district evaluation, determine what the information means and how it can be use to improve curriculum and instruction.

8. Communicate assessment results to students, parents, and peers.                                                   

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.4; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2, 4; NBPTS 1,3, Core #3
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework; Knowledge 2c,  Skills 1g, 2c,  Dispositions 2e
  • Assessment: Roll play, classroom discursion, develop a dialogue for a parent/teacher conference

9. Utilize assessment results to evaluate classroom instruction for a diverse student population.  

  • MoSTEP 1.2.8.4; NCATE 1; ISLLC 2; NBPTS 1,3, Core # 4
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 3b, Skills 2c, 2d, Dispositions 3g, 4d
  • Assessments: case studies, use of 6-Trait scoring, differentiated instruction

10. Explain the professional (legal and ethical) responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment

  • MoSTEP 1.2.9.3, NCATE 1; ISLLC 5, NBPTS 3, 4, Core # 2
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework Knowledge 3b, 3c, Skill 2c, Dispositions 3e
  • Review of court cases, classroom discussion, quizzes

11. Practice theories and applications of technology in education settings and have adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students

  • MoSTEP 1.2.11, ISLLC 2, NBPTS 3; Core #2
  • School for Education Conceptual Framework Knowledge 2d, Skill 2f, 3a,        Dispositions 2d
  • Student Power Point presentations, create a rubric, create an informal evaluation for student use in the classroom.

Grading:
 

Kaleidoscope Profile and activity                                   25 points                                                         

5 Chapter Tests (2,7,4,5 & 6) @25 points each            125 points

Selected and Constructed Response Items                     90 points

            Reflection                                                          10 points

Book Report performance activity                                  10 points

Rubric for performance task                                          10 points

            Rubric Reflection                                               10 points

Likert Inventory                                                             10 points

Likert Reflection                                                10 points

Case Study                                                                     10 points

            Case Study Reflection                                        10 points

Article Reflections 4 @ 10 points each                           40 points

Portfolio Assessment    Notebook                                 10 points

RTI Reflection                                                               10 points

Power Point Reflection Presentation        (core)              50 points
 
TOTAL                                                                        430 points

“A”      =          387-430 points

“B”       =          344-386 points

“C”      =          301-343 points

Because of the intensity of this course, you MUST come to class. 

 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Prior arrangements must be made with the instructor for late assignments. 
Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems.  printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

1. Respect for instructor and other students in the class.
2. Turn off cell phones or put on vibrate if you are expecting an emergency, while in class

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

WEEK

TOPIC/Standards

ASSIGNMENT

1: 10/23

Assessment’s Significance to Educational Leaders, What to Measure and How to Interpret Results, High Quality Comparative Data

MoSTEP 1.2.8.2, 1.1.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC 2, NBPTS 3

Popham: Chapters 1, 2, & 7- READ

Introduction, In class discussion and practice exercises

Kaleidoescope profile in class

     Reflection activity due 10/30

Quiz over Chapters 2 & 7 in class

2: 10/30

Instructional Contribution, The Validity of Assessment-Based Interpretations, Reliability of Assessment Devices, Absence of Bias

MoSTEP 1.1.1, 1.2.8.1, NCATE 1, Isllc 2,4, NBPTS 1, 2, 4

Popham: Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6: READ

In class discussion and practice exercises

Quiz over Chapters 4, 5 & 6

3: 11/6

What is Response to Intervention, RTI Instead of Discepancy Models, Using RTI Procedures for Assessment of Academic Difficulties, Using RTI Procedures with Students from Diverse Backgrounds; Considering Ability, Culture, Language, Race, and Relition

MoSTEP 1.2.8.2, 1.1.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC 2, NBPTS 3

RTI: Chapters 1, 3, 7 & 8-READ

In class discussion and practice exercises

Reflection of RTI due 11/13

4. 11/13

Selected-Response Items, Constructed-Response Items, Improving Test Items MoSTEP 1.2.8.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC 2, 5, NBPTS 3, 4

Popham: Chapters 9, 10 & 12: READ

WLC and Library for books for test items

Practice writing test items in class- Rough draft with peer reviews

Final copy and reflection due 11/27

5: 11/20

Performance and Portfolio Assessment, Creating Affective Measures

MoSTEP 1.2.8.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC 2, 5, NBPTS 3, 4

Popham : Chapters 11 & 13 READ

Classroom discussion and exercises. Begin to develop performance assignment and rubric,

Video- Complex Instruction and 6+ Traits

Practice making Likert Inventory : Final copy and reflection due 11/27

6. 11/27

Administering Educational Tests and Using the Results (Stanford 10, MAP, Standardized tests used with IDEA evaluations), Special Education Process, Case Studies, Using RTI procedures as some of Special Education Eligibilities

MoSTEP 1.1.1, 1.2.9.3, NCATE 1, ISLLC 1, 2, 5, NBPTS 3, 4

RIT; Chapter 9 READ

“Impact of Assessment on Students” various journal articles. (handouts)

Case study activity in class

     Case Study assignment and reflection due 12/4

Handouts for grading- READ for 12/4

7. 12/4

Accountability Tests: Make or Break assessments for Educational Leaders

Grading

MoSTEP 1.2.9.3, !.2.11, ISLLC 2, NBPTS 3

Popham: Chapter 15 READ

Handouts for grading discussion

Turn in Portfolio Assessment notebook

Power Point Reflection Presentations begin

8. 12/11

WRAP-UP

Power Point Reflections Presentations

Final Discussions

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct. Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, in a 16-week semester (or 2, in an 8-week term) will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Dean, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 28

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 

Banks, Steven R. (2005). Classroom Assessment Issues and Practices. New York, Pearson


Barton, Linda G. (1997). Quick Flip Questions for Critical Thinking. Edupress, Highsmith Inc.


Chappuis, Jan (November 2005). Helping Students Understand Assessment, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 39-43


Culham, Ruth (2006). 100 Trait-Specific Comments, A quick guide for giving constructive feedback on student writing. New York, Scholastic, Inc.


Haggart, William (2002). A Guide to the Kaleidoscope Profile: Interpreting your Styles. Arlington, TX, Performance Learning Systems, Publications Division


http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/unitindex.html, Curriculum, Assessment, National Assessment of Educational Progress. And Gifted Programs


Marzano, Robert J. (2000). Transforming Classroom Grading. Alexandria, Virginia, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


McTighe, J. & O’Connor, K, (November 2005) Seven Practices for Effective Learning. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 10-17


Niguidula, David (November 2005). Documenting Learning with Digital Portfolios. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 44-47


Popham, W. James (September, 2004). Why Assessment Illiteracy is Professional Suicide. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 62 (1), 82-83


Sattler, Jerome M. (1992). Assessment of Children, Revised and Updated Third Edition. San         Diego. Jerome M. Sattler Publisher, Inc.


Stiggins, Rick (May 2007). Assessment Through the Student’s Eyes. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 64 (8), 22-26


Tomlinson, Carol Ann. (2003). Instructional Strategies for the Differentiated Classroom, (Complex InstructionVideo 4 and Facilitator’s Guide) (Available from Association for Supervision and Development, Alexandria Virginia)


Attachments:
Selected and Constructed Response Test Items

Likert Inventories

Rubric for Assessment Presentation

Kaleidoscope Profile and Activity

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:10/31/2007 4:19:16 AM