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AR 390 History of the Designed Environment: Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present
Buckingham, Leslie Lynn


AR 390 History of the Designed Environment: Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present

3 Credit Hours

Fall 2004   August 23 – December 10

Tuesday – Thursday   11:35-12:50  

Leslie Buckingham, Senior Instructor

Office in Interior Design,  MA430C

Office Hours by appt.

(816) 678-1144 Phone and Voicemail

Leslie.Buckingham@park.edu

www.captain.park.edu/buckingham

 

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The continuation of the study of architecture, interiors, furniture and the decorative arts in the context of Western culture begins with the aesthetic movements of the late 19th Century and progresses through the modern and post-modern movements of the 20th Century, ending with a survey of present and future design trends.  Students will understand modern design movements in the context of the immense social changes that took place beginning with the industrial revolution and continuing through the information age.  Students will learn to identify the work of individual 20th Century architects and furniture designers.

Pre-requisite:  AR298

 

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY

The instructor’s educational philosophy is one based on interactive learning based on lectures, readings, examinations, and gallery tours. 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

·         Describe the elements and characteristics that define the design movements that took place from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

·         Connect modern design movements to their context: historical events, geographical area, culture, religion, art and literature.

·         Recognize the work of significant interior designers and architects, classifying the work according to its place in time and the design movement it represents.

·         Identify modern furniture, especially chairs, by the designer’s name and the design movement each represents.

·         Make connections between the design of the built environment and its impact on our personal and working lives.

·         Identify and analyze design trends for the early 21st Century.

 

COURSE TEXTBOOK

  • John Pile.  A History of Interior Design.  Second Edition.  (Hoboken, NJ:  John Wiley & Sons, 2005) [ISBN 0-471-46434-1]

OR

  • John Pile.  A History of Interior Design.  First Edition. (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2000) [ISBN 0-471-35666-2]

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments.  Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.

              

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism – the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work – sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance.  Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY

Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences.  The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment.  Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.  In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment.  Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of an F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency. 

 

In my class, you are allowed a maximum of only 2 unexcused absences without penalty to your grade as long as you are responsible for the work missed, etc.  Additional absences will hurt your grade dramatically.  Two instances of the following will count as one absence:  coming to class late, leaving early, or falling asleep.  ATHLETES contact me after class and let me know if away-games will take you out of class.

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS

Assignments will be accepted up to one week after their due date, but will be penalized one letter grade (10 percentage points).  Students may NOT make up quizzes or exams missed because of an unexcused absence.

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT

Assessment in this course is by means of:

·         Text and related readings

·         Lectures, discussions

·         Tests, identifying visual images

·         Research projects

·        Oral presentation of projects

 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT

Please turn cell phones and pagers off during class.  Students who disrupt class with these items will be asked to leave and could suffer appropriate penalties for tardiness (see above attendance policy).

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:  www.park.edu/disability.

 

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS

Pay attention in class.  Dates for exams and assignments are subject to revision!!

You are asked to read the appropriate sections of your textbook for the subjects listed.  These readings should be completed prior to the class for which they are assigned.  During the second week of class, I will pass out a signup list for individual projects.  These projects will be due at various times within the semester.

 

August

24

Introduction to the class

Review Chapter 12

 

26

Review of the Victorian Era

The Aesthetic Movement

Read Chapter 13

 

The Victorian Era

Britain:  Arts and Crafts

31

United States:  The Craftsman Movement

Developments in Continental Europe

September

2

Art Nouveau and the Vienna Secession

Read Chapter 14

Roots and Characteristics of Art Nouveau

Belgium

7

France

Spain

Germany:  Jugendstil

9

Scandinavia

Austria:  The Vienna Secession

United States

14

Eclecticism

Read Chapter 15

The Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris

United States

16

Europe

21

EXAM

Chapters 13-15

 

23

The Emergence of Modernism

Read Chapter 16

Frank Lloyd Wright

De Stijl

28

Pioneers of the International Style

 

30

Art Deco and Industrial Design

Read Chapter 17

Art Deco

October

5

Industrial Design

7

Residential Design

12

The Spread of Early Modernism in Europe

Read Chapter 18

The Netherlands

Germany and Austria

 

14

Italy

Switzerland

19

NO CLASS – Fall Recess

21

26

 

 

France

Scandinavia

England

28

EXAM

Chapters 16-18

 

November

2

Modernism in America

Read Chapter 19

Architects and Designers

4

Interior Decoration:  The Reaction to Modernism

9

Furniture and other Interior Furnishings

11

NO CLASS – Veterans’ Day

16

The Ascendancy of Modernism

Read Chapter 20

Italy

Scandinavia

France

18

Germany

The Netherlands

Britain

23

United States

Furniture and Other Interior Furnishings

25

NO CLASS – Thanksgiving

30

Contemporary Design

Read Chapter 21

Prophets of Future Design

High Tech

December

2

Post-modernism

The Revival of Tradition

7

Late Modernism

Individual Stylists

9

Deconstructivism

16

FINAL

Chapters 19-21

10:15-12:15

 

I will make every attempt to load the images used in class into the computers in the interior design computer lab.  They will be listed under the shared files folder entitled ‘History’.  Please make use of these while studying.

 

GRADING PLAN

 

Class Participation                    100                              A = 90-100% (450-500)

Individual Projects                    100                              B = 80-89% (400-449)

Exams (3 @ 100 pts each)       300                              C = 70-79% (350-399)

                                                                                    D = 60-69% (300-349)

                         TOTAL =       500                              F = 59% and below (299 and below)