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CA 491 Senior Project in Comm Arts
Noe, J. Mark


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 491 Senior Project

Semester

FA 2007 HOC

Faculty

Noe, J. Mark

Title

Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Professor of Communication Arts

Office Location

203 Copley Hall

Office Hours

By Appointment

Daytime Phone

816.584.6320 or Administrative Assisant, Janice Sieminski 816.584.6263

E-Mail

jmark.noe@park.edu

Semester Dates

August 20 - December 14, 2007

Class Days

By arrangement with Professor

Class Time

By arrangement with Professor

Prerequisites

This course may not be taken before the senior year

Credit Hours

3


Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
This course may not be taken before senior year. It is a capstone course in which the student designs a practical project aimed at publication in a commercial newspaper or magazine (or broadcast outlet), researches the project, completes the writing (or broadcast production), and may offer it to the appropriate editors. 3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. To design an original research project that examines a specific area within the communication discipline.
  2. To clearly and concisely state the goals of the project and the questions to be explored.
  3. To provide an overview of the scholarly literature in the area of inquiry.
  4. To select an appropriate methodology to gather data that addresses the research questions.
  5. To critically examine the data and draw appropriate conclusions that are consistent with the evidence.


Core Assessment:

The core assessment consists of a two-semester, five part research project containing a Introduction, Review of the Literature, Research Methodology, Results and Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Faculty’s Educational Philosophy:

            Vocational                    ¬¾¾®        Career               ¬¾¾®       Liberal Arts

            Education                                           Education                                   Education

(emphasis on immediate goals)                                                                     (emphasis on long-term goals)

 

Colleges and universities are not designed to be vocational schools.  Unlike trade schools that prepare students for a specific career (e.g. auto repair, hair dressing), the four-year college/university is dedicated to educating citizens for social, political, and economic life.  Some classes that may not be perceived as “relevant” (i.e., direct application to a career) are relevant to the future of the student as an effective member of society.  If the sole emphasis is on “getting a job,” the immediate goal may threaten the broader issue of what jobs might exist in the future.  A person who is narrowly trained to do a job today may be out of a job tomorrow.  Over specialization may result in the specialty becoming obsolete in the long run.  The Communication Theory and Human Relations graduate is prepared not only for entry-level jobs, but also has the skills sought for middle management positions.  Jobs in human resources, training and development, staff development, public relations, sales, or management are potential career choices.  Others may choose to pursue additional study in graduate schools.

Grading:

The final project will be graded using a rubric developed by Dr. Steve Atkinson for evaluating the Writing Competency Test (WCT). Some minor modifications have been made to adapt the rubric to the specific assignment.

The final project will be evaluated using the following four criteria:

Focus

An "A" is awarded to a project whose controlling idea seems not only clear but particularly thoughtful or imaginative.

A "B" indicates a focus that is clear and sustained throughout but that may not be especially original.

A "C" indicates satisfactory competence: the focus is clear but commonplace or conventional.

"D" and "F" projects lack focus.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Late Work:  All Senior Projects must be submitted to Dr. Noe in Copley 203 by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, December 10th, 2007.  Late projects will not be accepted.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Due Dates: All Senior Projects must be submitted to Dr. Noe in Copley 203 by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, December 10th 2007. Late projects will not be accepted.

Course Dates and Assignments:

Part I – Introduction

A Statement of Purpose and Justification for conducting the project. (4-8 weeks, depending on prior preparation. This is the stage of moving from the general to the specific and narrowing the scope to a manageable size.)

Part II – Review of the Literature

You will need a minimum of ten sources such as articles from journals and books. Summarize each source and tell how it relates to your specific purpose. (8-12 weeks to locate, summarize, and synthesize current literature related to the project. Students who finish early may continue to Part III.)

Part III – Research Methodology

Can include surveys, interview guides, statistical analyses, etc. (7-9 weeks. All instruments must be approved before they are administered to research participants. This section also includes the research setting, data collection, controls, etc.)

Part IV – Results and Discussion

This section explains the findings obtained in Section III. (6-8 weeks)

Part V – Directions for Future Research

1. Is there a need for further research in the area of inquiry?

2. Have I added to the pool of information?

3. What are the limitations of the current study? (1-2 weeks)

Note – The word “communication” should appear in the title of the Senior Project. Sections I and II must be completed during the first semester. Students who finish those sections early may proceed to Section III. Refinements to Sections I and II may be finished during the second semester.

Evidence

1. Importance of evidence

A. Protection from dogmatists.

B. Enhance credibility/persuasiveness of argument.

C. Demonstrate soundness of position.

2. Definition of evidence

A. Definition - the verifiable condition of fact or opinion used to give credence to a line of reasoning (argument) structured for the express purpose of securing adherence to a position.

B. Types

1. Factual. Known to be true in past or present. Facts are living, growing, hanging events with cores that represent enough relative permanence so as to enable us to count on them and use them for confirming a belief.

a. Can be verified with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

b. Factual examples tend to be more influential than hypothetical examples.

c. Examples can aid comprehension of an argument.

2. Opinion. An interpretation of facts or a judgment of value concerning them. An opinion is support for a statement only when the person making the statement is in a position to know, observe, and interpret given facts.

a. Who is an authority? What should I consider when using it?

i. Person who has specific qualifications.

ii. Sometimes this is the only type of evidence available.

iii. Shouldn't rely too heavily on.

iv. Untrained witnesses are lay witnesses. These should only be used as

evidence when they are only reporting their observations, not their

interpretations of facts.

b. Authority is evidence when:

i. A relevant authority gives his or her opinion.

ii. A complete and accurate citation is given.

iii. The source is unprejudiced.

3. Tests of evidence

A. General tests

1. Is there enough evidence offered?

2. Is the evidence clear and meaningful?

3. Is the source clearly and accurately cited?

4. Is the evidence the most recent?

5. Is the evidence typical?

6. Is the evidence internally consistent?

7. Is the evidence relevant?

B. Specific tests

1. Factual examples

a. Have all the facts in the example been cited?

b. How credible is the witness? This is important when the information is not already

public knowledge.

c. Is the fact distorted?

d. How recent is the fact?

e. Are the facts relevant?

2. Statistics

a. Was the unit of study clearly defined?

b. Are the units of statistics an accurate index of what we want to prove?

c. Are the statistical units comparable?

d. Can other studies verify the findings?

3. Authority

a. Did the authority quoted make the study?

b. Does the authority have the necessary training?

c. Is the authority in a position to gain access to important information?

d. Is the authority biased?

e. Is the authority prone to hyperbole?

f. Is the authority internally consistent?

g. Is the authority externally consistent?

h. Is the authority respected in the field?

4. Witnesses

a. Did the witness have an opportunity to observe what was happening?

b. Was the witness physically capable of observing the event?

c. Is the witness capable of accurately reporting the event?

d. Is the witness prone to hyperbole?

e. Is the witness free from personal involvement?

4. Ethics of evidence

A. Selective reporting

1. Is the quotation taken out of context?

2. Is important information deleted in the presentation of the evidence (e.g., important

words and phrases, date)?

3. Is the source cited?

B. Colored reporting - Is the information deliberately falsified?

C. Implications of selective and colored reporting

1. Persuasion based on deception is unethical. It has the potential of persuading an

audience to take specific courses of action based on faulty information.

They could take actions that are detrimental to themselves and/or others.

2. It could destroy the speaker's credibility even if the speakers had not intentionally

selectively reported the information.

5. Research should be thorough

A. Need to thoroughly research a topic. Know both the position that you want to advocate

and the position taken by the opposition.

B. Should carefully take notes. Don't delete important information about the text itself or the

source.

6. Each evidence citation should include:

A. The name of the author (if given).

B. The qualifications of the author (if given).

C. The title of the article (for periodicals).

D. The title of the publication.

E. The date of publication.

F. The page number from which the quotation was taken.

(A, B, D, and E should always be included in the oral presentation of evidence)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The core assessment consists of a two-semester, five part research project containing a Introduction, Review of the Literature, Research Methodology, Results and Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} Review of Literature contains 10 sources. Review of Literature contains less than 10 sources. Review of Literature does not contain any sources. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Research methodology is directly tied to the purpose and yields a rich data source that exceeds expectations. Research methodology is tied to the purpose and determines the information that is needed. Research methodology is not directly tied to purpose and does not yield the relevant information needed Research methodology does not relate to the purpose and does not yield relevant information. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Results and Discussion shows mastery of systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions related to purpose of study. Results and Discussion shows use of acceptable and systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions. Results and Discussion shows use of some acceptable and systematic research methods to discover patterns of human interaction and draw appropriate conclusions. Results and Discussion does not show use of acceptable and systematic research methods and draws inappropriate conclusions. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Extensive use of professional-level vocabulary. Acceptable use of appropriate vocabulary. Rudimentary, inappropriate use of vocabulary. Poor, inappropriate use of vocabulary. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Professional mastery in all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. Meets acceptable standards in all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. Meets some of the acceptable standards in all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. Does not meet acceptable standards in all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Meets all General Tests of Evidence: (1) Is there enough evidence offered? (2) Is the evidence clear and meaningful? (3) Is the source clearly and accurately cited? (4) Is the evidence the most recent? (5) Is the evidence typical? (6) Is the evidence internally consistent? (7) Is the evidence relevant? Meets most of the General Tests of Evidence: (1) Is there enough evidence offered? (2) Is the evidence clear and meaningful? (3) Is the source clearly and accurately cited? (4) Is the evidence the most recent? (5) Is the evidence typical? (6) Is the evidence internally consistent? (7) Is the evidence relevant? Meets some of the General Tests of Evidence: (1) Is there enough evidence offered? (2) Is the evidence clear and meaningful? (3) Is the source clearly and accurately cited? (4) Is the evidence the most recent? (5) Is the evidence typical? (6) Is the evidence internally consistent? (7) Is the evidence relevant? Does not meet the General Tests of Evidence: (1) Is there enough evidence offered? (2) Is the evidence clear and meaningful? (3) Is the source clearly and accurately cited? (4) Is the evidence the most recent? (5) Is the evidence typical? (6) Is the evidence internally consistent? (7) Is the evidence relevant? 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Project focus is clear, thoughtful and imaginative, sources are smoothly integrated and persuasively support the project focus, sequence of topics is smooth with a convincing rhetorical pattern, and there are no grammatical errors. Project focus is clear and sustained, sources clearly support the purpose, sequence of topics is logical, and occasional sentence structure or diction problems do not seriously distract the reader. Project focus is clear but commonplace, sources are not always relevant and critically discussed, sequence of topics is generally easy to follow but may occasionally wander, and there are enough mechanical problems to temporarily distract the reader. Project lacks focus, makes no use of sources, sequence of topics is difficult to follow, and has severe problems with sentence structure or word choice. 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Project contains all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research and is completed on a professional-level. Project contains all five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. Project is lacking one or more of the five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. Project does not contain the five project components: Introduction, Review of Literature, Research Methodology, Results & Discussion, and Directions for Future Research. 

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Last Updated:8/23/2007 9:04:55 AM