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CH 108 Introduction to Chemistry II
Yates, David


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CH 108 Introduction to Chemistry II

Semester

UJL 2007 HO

Faculty

Yates, David

Title

Laboratory Coordinator/Chemical Hygiene Officer

Degrees/Certificates

M.S. , NRCC- CHO, 40 hour HAZWOPER Cert.,

Office Location

Science Hall 03A

Office Hours

Sched. :MTWR 2:00-4:00 PM, F: By arrangement only; Unsched.-OPEN DOOR POLICY-If my door is open I am available to students.

Daytime Phone

816-584-6515

Other Phone

816-914-1728(CELL)

E-Mail

david.yates@park.edu

Web Page

Under construction

Semester Dates

09 July – 03 August 2007

Class Days

-MTWR--

Class Time

8:00 - 10:15 AM

Prerequisites

earned “C” or better in CH107

Credit Hours

3:0:3


Textbook:

Chemistry  The Central Science, 10th edition, 2006, Brown, LeMay, Bursten,

ISBN  0-13-146489-2,  

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources:

-A scientific calculator (with statistical capabilities)

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
continuation of CH 107 with major topics covered including solutions, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibria, and an introduction to descriptive chemistry. Three lectures and one hour discussion per week. PREREQUISITE: 'C' or better in CH 107L or permission of instructor. CO-REQUISITE: CH 108L . 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

The instructor’s education philosophy is based on inquiry and constructivism utilizing lecture, lecture demonstrations, discussions, dialogues, readings, laboratory investigations, quizzes, examinations, videos, internet, and writings e.g. formal laboratory reports, and a review of the literature over some aspect of chemistry.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe = solutions, solubility, colligative properties (perform calculations of these properties), and colloid formation.
  2. Apply the = kinetic theory to a chemical reaction and perform calculations using the = rate laws and transition energy.
  3. Write = simple reaction mechanisms and describe the function of = catalysts.
  4. Describe = equilibrium and estimate equilibrium information.
  5. Describe = acid-base concept, assess acid and base strength, describe and perform = calculations on weak acids and bases, buffer solutions, and salts of weak acids = and bases and determine pH.
  6. Explain = and apply the first law of thermodynamics.
  7. Describe = and perform calculations on voltaic and electrolytic = cells.
  8. Describe = reactions and trends of the main group elements and nuclear decay and = reactions.
  9. Relate = and apply scientific methods to chemical situations and scientific = literature.


Core Assessment:

 Final Exam

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Your final grade will be based on three (4) one-hour exams and a comprehensive final.  (See dates under COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS.  The dates of exams are on Wednesday.)  Your grade will also reflect your performance on weekly quizzes and your lab performance (see separate syllabus for lab) and homework. 

 

Snow/tornado days – If there is no class due to inclement weather, the scheduled exam will be given the next class time.  If the weather affects the final, check with the nursing office or your email for an alternate date.  This will most likely be the following Wednesday or Thursday.

 

MAKE UP EXAMS    If you miss an exam and choose to make up the zero, an exam will be given the Thursday of finals week.  This exam will count as the missed exam.  This exam will be over any material I choose.  You cannot miss more than one exam.  Any exams missed over one will have a grade entered as zero. 

If you know you will be absent for an exam, see me, call, or e-mail to set up a time to take it before the class.  You will have this privilege once during the semester. 

 

Homework

You are to do the first three red colored problems of each section behind each chapter under “Problems”.  You also are to do 4 (every other blue numbered questions) from the Additional Problems section and the first red question from Apply Your Knowledge. You must show all work.  You must show all steps to get to that answer that appears in back of the text.  Box in the final result.  Staple the pages.  Be careful not to staple through problems.  The grader will not struggle to try to read your work through a staple.  Put your name on the top page.  Failure to show all work will result in no credit for the problem.

*      Failure to box in the final answer will result in a deduction of ¼-problem credit.

*      Failure to staple the pages will result in a deduction of ¼ credit of the problem-set.

*      If you staple through written work, the grader will not struggle to try to read your work.  Zero credit will be given for that problem. 

*      Failure to put your name on the top page will result in no one grading the problem set. 

Late Homework:  You will be given a check mark for any homework late.  This is a zero numerically.  

No Homework:    You will be given a zero.  More than three zeros will result in a decrease of one letter grade for the course.  More than five zeros will result in a decrease of two letter grades for the course. 

Grading:

Exams(4)     35%            A                 85-100

Final           25%            B                 75-84

Quiz            10%            C                 60-74

Homework   10%            D                 50-59

Rev. of Lit.   20%            F                 <50

Late Submission of Course Materials:

The instructor will not accept assignments late.  Assignments not submitted on the due date will receive a grade of “zero”.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drive crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

Remember, you are not the only one in class and we have a lot of material to cover.  Ask questions, but do not monopolize the class time. 

 

Purchase a stapler.  All reports and papers must be stapled.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week

Topics/Assignments

1 M

Solutions

T

Colligative Properties

W

Kinetics

R

Rates and Conc change

2 M

Rxn Mechanisms

T

Equilibrium

W

LeChatelier’s Principle

R

Acid-base equilibrium

3 M

pH and K’s

T

Common ion/buffers

W

Titrations

R

Second Law of Thermo

4 M

Gibb’s Free Energy

T

REDOX and Voltaic cells

W

EMF and Gibbs

R.

Chemistry of the Nonmetals



Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-89

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "W".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of scientific principles and concepts.  As much as possible we will discuss how chemistry is used in everyday activities.  In order to achieve the goals, you will be asked to come to class prepared to take an active role in the lecture.  Outside of class you will need to work problems, read the text, and re-write your notes, take practice tests.  This must be done daily if you expect to get a decent grade for the course.  Chemistry, as all science courses, cannot be learned the night before the exam.  Chemistry is learning, not memorizing, although it may seem to be a lot of memorizing.  This is due to the development of your scientific language.  As a general rule, you should do three hours of outside classroom work for each hour of class work.  You are responsible for all material covered in the text and any additional material in class. 


 


Expectations:


§          come to class.


§          come prepared for class.


§          do not monopolize class time.  We have a lot of material to cover and I will generally be in my office 6 or more hours a day.  Having said that, if you have a question about the course material usually someone else will have the same question.  Remember: aside from redundancy there is no such thing as a stupid question.


§          utilize practice tests


§          submit homework problems.


§          adhere to published due dates.  (Late work is NOT accepted for a grade.)


 


Review of the Literature




   
       
           
       
       
           
       
       
           
       
       
           
       
   

           

Chemistry 108
Literature Review Project


           

           


           

           


The objective of this assignment is the preparation of a literature report demonstrating your ability to search the chemical reference literature for specialized information related to a specific topic or technique. The nature of the assignment allows you to fulfill this task by selecting a topic that is of personal interest to you, perhaps because of past experience or (future) interests.

You should select a unique topic that involves chemistry in some way. You must obtain approval from Mr. Yates for your topics before proceeding with the writing of the reports. Finding good topics is the hardest step for many students. One way to find a topic is to browse current journals that publish chemistry papers. If possible, a key literature reference might be selected to provide an "entrance" to the literature of the chosen area. The Journal of Chemical Education, The Chemist, and C&E News (all in Park’s library) are just three journals to start your search and may provide a useful source of ideas. For example, the topic might involve a particular separation problem, a new energy calculation, or another theoretical idea. Your topic should not overlap with that of another student.

Presumably, if you choose a topic of interest to you, you may find yourself motivated enough to read in detail all the articles that you find! As your chemistry career progresses, it is exactly this sort of reading on your own that will serve as an important way to advance your knowledge. The summary and list of journal references that you produce should be complete enough to provide an adequate overview of the current state-of-the-art in the selected topic.

The reference list of research publications related to your chosen topic should place emphasis on journal articles published within the last few years.


           

           

           
               
                   
                       
                   
               
           

                       

References older than 10 years should not be included unless they represent truly major contributions or unless the literature is sparse. The primary source of this reference list should be research journals not textbooks, although textbooks may be listed as background references if necessary. Because the emphasis is on recent literature, it is appropriate to seek material from the following sources:

a. Scan current journals for articles published in the last few months.

b. Search abstracting indexes such as "Current Contents" for appropriate keywords related to the topic; this will identify publications 6-12 months old.

c. Having found an article in the literature that is several years old, you can find more recently published articles that reference that old article by searching "Science Citation Index." SCI is published several times each year and five-year cumulative indexes are published. You can find the listing of the old article in SCI and under the listing, any articles that cite that article during the pertinent time period. This is good way to quantitate the importance of an article to the growth of the literature in an area: important articles will tend to be cited more heavily (although it is possible to be cited for a major debacle).  Ask our librarian for help if needed.

d. Another avenue of literature exploration is the computer-searchable CD-ROM material available in the Linda Hall Library or web databases provided by the Park University library. Use these sources, but do not rely on them alone. There is a considerable delay before articles appear in the any database. If you are looking for current or recent articles, browsing the current journals may be the best resource.


                       

           

           


           


Specific instructions

1. Select your topic and get approval from Mr. Yates

2. Compile your list of references (you should have used a minimum of 2 references (for meets expectations) in your list per page of paper(not citations): i.e. a 4 page paper would use 8 refs.; a 5 page paper would use 10 at the minimum), arranging them sequentially, based upon when first cited in the paper. Use the ACS reference style for the appropriate literature citation style(see attachment).  It might be useful to mark with an asterisk the more important or interesting articles that you have found. Also, include in your citation of each article the TITLE of the paper; place it between the author list and the journal name. Although including the title deviates from the ACS citation style, retaining it with the reference may make the list of citations more useful to you in the future. 



3. Write a summary describing the topic that you selected for your literature survey. Your written report should explain the background of the problem, and should describe the major approaches used to solve the task or problem. Focus on the instrumental analysis techniques employed if the article is on instrumentation. Describe instrumentation, conditions, etc., along a summary of results achieved. You can imagine that the report you are writing might serve as the background introduction to an article on this subject. The text should refer to the literature that you have found by citing the references by number from your list grouped at the end of the paper.  Your paper should average, at a minimum, 3 citations per paragraph( for meets expectations) Excluding the Introduction and Conclusion.

4. Your report should be typed in double-spaced format. The writing should be concise— no less than five pages, no more than six pages in length, not including the list of references or the cover sheet.  The last counted page should be at least ¾ filled.  Diagrams and inserts should be placed at the end so as not to count as your text.   Insert the date that the literature report was completed at the bottom of the report.  Font: no greater than 12, Margins:  one inch on all sides.  You may use up to three websites, properly referenced.

5. Turn in your completed literature review by 7/26/07, no later than 5:00 pm by sending a copy of the report (preferably in Microsoft Word format) as an email attachment to Mr. Yates.  “The subject line must be CH108 report.”  Your report will be graded and returned to you by email by the last day of class, 8/2/07.


 


 


 


Problems               You are expected to spend a minimum of three hours a day on problem solving(the class goes very fast and you must keep up).


 



It is well known to the scientific community that by engaging on hands-on, intellectually stimulating activities and by encouraging people (i.e., students) to ask questions and think critically, learning science becomes enjoyable and exciting.  Hence, it is recommended that you do all the problems at the end of each chapter.  It is highly recommended that you do all the odd problems at the end of each chapter.  The answers to these are in the back of the text and the solutions are in the Student Solution Manual. See homework discussion above for the problems that need to be turned in. 



 


Doing Problems sets:  Some students do not read the assigned material but go right to the problems and try to solve them  When they cannot solve a particular problem, they go back into the chapter and find a worked example that is similar enough to the assigned problem to provide the necessary parallel steps.  This method of using the textbook neither saves time nor gives the best preparation for exam.  It simply treats the problem sets as homework and will not help you understand the concepts you need to know. 


 


Equations, formulas, diagrams, tables, illustrations, etc:  Paying attention to equations:  highlighting each equation as it appears becomes mechanical and is unlikely to aid in comprehension.  On the other hand, writing out the equations to explain what they mean and performing the mathematical manipulations described can be quite useful to you.  Drawing the essential parts of a diagram can also be useful.  Remember that when you see a diagram, a formula, or an equation you should expect to spend more time with it than regular text, not less time.  That is because diagrams, formulas, and equations are usually shorthand methods of expressing ideas.


Attachments:
Literature Review Rubric

Lab Report Rubric

Periodic Table

Conversion Factors

concentrations of Acids

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1,2,4,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
• Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown, relevant/extraneous, and derive the necessary equations
• Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem.  
• Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.
• Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and what is needed, and determine and/or derive equations necessary to solve the problem.
• Balance REDOX equations in neutral, acidic, and basic solutions and apply to electrochemical cells.
• Draw and explain an electrochemical cell
• Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the  Nernst Equation, Free energy tables, and entropy-enthalpy tables.

 
• Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown, relevant/extraneous, and choose the necessary equations
• Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (3 from:  colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem.  
• Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (3 from:  acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.
• Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and what is needed, and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.
• Balance REDOX equations in neutral, acidic solution and apply to electrochemical cells and thermodynamics.
• Draw and explain an electrochemical cell
• Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the  Nernst Equation, Free energy tables, and entropy-enthalpy tables.

 
• Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown and choose the necessary equations
• Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (2 from:  colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem.  
• Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (2 from:  acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.
• Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.
• Balance REDOX equations in neutral solution and apply to electrochemical cells and thermodynamics.
• Draw and explain an electrochemical cell
• Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the  Nernst Equation, Free energy tables or entropy-enthalpy tables.

 
• Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown and choose the necessary equations
• Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (1 from:  colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem.  
• Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (1 from:  acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.
• Be able to draw cell an electrochemical cell showing all components), evaluate information given and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.
• Balance REDOX equations in neutral solution.
• Draw and explain an electrochemical cell
• Evaluate Gibbs free energy using Free energy tables.

 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
• Determine the rate of a reaction graphically and using initial rates
• Show how the rate is dependent on concentration by deriving the necessary equations, propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem
• Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given
• Combine equations showing how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.
• Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions.  
• Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.
 
• Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates
• Use equations that relate the rate to concentration
• propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem
• Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given
• Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.
• Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions.  
• Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.
 
Do five of these:
• Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates
• Use equations that relate the rate to concentration
• propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem
• Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given
• Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.
• Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions.  
• Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.
 
Do three of these:
• Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates
• Use equations that relate the rate to concentration
• propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem
• Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given
• Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.
• Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions.  
• Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.
 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2,3,4,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
• Determine the rate law for a given set of data
• Propose kinetic mechanisms
• Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant
• Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation
• Write equilibrium-constant expressions
• Identify acid and base species
• Identify Lewis acid/base
• Write solubility product expressions
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.
• Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis
• Analyze the outcome of a reaction predicted by ??G.
 
Be able to do nine of:
• Determine the rate law for a given set of data
• Propose kinetic mechanisms
• Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant
• Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation
• Write equilibrium-constant expressions
• Identify acid and base species
• Identify Lewis acid/base
• Write solubility product expressions
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.
• Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis
• Analyze the outcome of a reaction predicted by ??G.
 
Be able to do seven of:
• Determine the rate law for a given set of data
• Propose kinetic mechanisms
• Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant
• Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation
• Write equilibrium-constant expressions
• Identify acid and base species
• Identify Lewis acid/base
• Write solubility product expressions
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.
• Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis
 
Be able to do five of:
• Determine the rate law for a given set of data
• Propose kinetic mechanisms
• Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant
• Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation
• Write equilibrium-constant expressions
• Identify acid and base species
• Identify Lewis acid/base
• Write solubility product expressions
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials
• Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.
• Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis
 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2,3,4,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
• Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction
• Calculate solution concentration
• Convert concentration units
• Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights
• Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions
• Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture
• Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition
• Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.
• Calculate [H+], [OH- ], and pH
• Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH
• Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.
• Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral
• Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution
• Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.
• Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.
• Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa
• Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion
• Predict whether precipitation will occur
• Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation
• Calculate the emf  and Gibb's Free Energy change from standard potentials
• Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

 
Be able to do 19 of the following:
• Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction
• Calculate solution concentration
• Convert concentration units
• Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights
• Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions
• Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture
• Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition
• Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.
• Calculate [H+], [OH- ], and pH
• Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH
• Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.
• Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral
• Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution
• Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.
• Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.
• Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa
• Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion
• Predict whether precipitation will occur
• Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation
• Calculate the emf  and Gibb's Free Energy change from standard potentials
• Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

 
Be able to do 16 of the following:
• Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction
• Calculate solution concentration
• Convert concentration units
• Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights
• Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions
• Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture
• Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition
• Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.
• Calculate [H+], [OH- ], and pH
• Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH
• Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.
• Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral
• Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution
• Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.
• Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.
• Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa
• Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion
• Predict whether precipitation will occur
• Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation
• Calculate the emf  and Gibb's Free Energy change from standard potentials
Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf
 
Be able to do 13 of the following:
• Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction
• Calculate solution concentration
• Convert concentration units
• Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights
• Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions
• Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture
• Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition
• Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.
• Calculate [H+], [OH- ], and pH
• Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH
• Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.
• Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral
• Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution
• Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.
• Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.
• Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa
• Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion
• Predict whether precipitation will occur
• Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation
• Calculate the emf  and Gibb's Free Energy change from standard potentials
Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf
 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Illustrate a complete understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations, derivations, insertions, and explaining all steps. Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations, insertions, and derivations. Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations and insertions. Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing insertions in an unspecified equation. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Interpret graphical representation of data
Create spread sheets to evaluate data
Graph data
 
Interpret graphical representation of data
Create spread sheets to evaluate data
Graph data
 
Interpret graphical representation of data
Graph data
 
Graph data 
First Literacies(or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
• Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic and organic nomenclature

• Demonstrate a complete knowledge of the periodic table

 
• Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic nomenclature (nonmetals and metals)
• Demonstrate a knowledge of periodic trends
 
• Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic nomenclature (metals)

• Demonstrate a knowledge of two periodic trends
 
• Demonstrate a knowledge of atomic names.

• Demonstrate a knowledge of one periodic trend
 
Second Literacies(or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for any concentration Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for molarity, molality, and normality Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for molarity Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions 

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Last Updated:7/2/2007 1:00:57 PM