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CA 302 Communication Ethics and Law
Norris, Lynn M.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 302 Communication Ethics and Law

Semester

F2J 2007 IN

Faculty

Lynn Marie Norris

Title

Adjunct Instructor of Communication Arts

Degrees/Certificates

M.A. in Communication, Pittsburg State University, Kansas
B.A. in Mass Communication, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Office Hours

before/after class or by appointment

Daytime Phone

(816) 886-6123

E-Mail

lynn.satterly@park.edu

manko.power@comcast.net

Semester Dates

October 22, 2007 to December 16, 2007

Class Days

W

Class Time

5:30 - 9:50 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Ethics in Media Communications Cases & Controversies, 5th Edition, by Louis Alvin Day, publisher Thomson-Wadsworth, 2006, ISBN 0-534-63714-0.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
A study of laws and ethics for journalists and other communicators.   The course will analyze libel law, privacy, and objectivity, responsibility,  freedom of speech and censorship, and the role of the press in society. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor has an interactive, student-centered approach to teaching. She strives to create a safe, comfortable class environment, and to include course materials that are both enjoyable and relevant, as well as academically sound. She may involve students in any or all of the following: class discussions, critiquing, demonstrations, exercises, field trips, games, group projects, guest speakers, internet, interviewing, journaling, problem solving, reading, role playing, self exploration, quizzes, web sites, and/or writing.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. begin the process of developing a framework for making ethical decisions in the field of communication
  2. engage in the discussion of ethical issues in a peaceful, thoughtful atmosphere and, thus, be better prepared to make ethical decisions as a communications professional in a crisis
  3. participate in ethical dialogue illustrating the dynamic nature of philosophical practice
  4. develop a working understanding of the basic principles of communication law


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. An awareness of their own personal values, beliefs, ideals, and morals.
  2. An understanding of the relationship between personal values and professional ethics.
  3. An ability to use their knowledge and reasoning skills to make ethical decisions.
  4. An appreciation for the importance of ethical communication.
  5. An understanding of the philosophical principles, laws, and professional standards that apply to various areas of mass communication.
Core Assessment:


Goals of the core curriculum in communication arts journalism: 



“Ethical thinking:



     In the core curriculum successful students consider at least these elements of the profession:



·        Consider the role of the communication professional in the community and what role they will personally play in the community as professionals



·        Consider the role of communication in the cultural conversation of the community



·        Consider their professional values and their personal values with an eye toward whether these values are in harmony



·        Consider their own purpose as professional communicators



·        Consider the specific role the journalist plays in society; duties and power begin the process of developing a framework for making ethical decisions in the field of communication” 



CA 302 Communication Ethics and Law -- Course Objectives: 



Engage in the discussion of ethical issues in a peaceful, thoughtful atmosphere and, thus, be better prepared to make ethical decisions as a communications professional in a crisis  



Participate in ethical dialogue illustrating the dynamic nature of philosophical practice  



Develop a working understanding of the basic principles of communication law  



Core Competency  



“Final paper -- Four-page reaction paper.  Topic to be announced.  Will examine ethical problem-solving techniques.” 



Here is the final paper from Spring 2006 with the working rubric: 



Final reaction paper



Communication Ethics and Law CA 302



Spring 2006 / Mr. Lofflin



Directions: Write a succinct four-page paper in which you apply all the philosophers and philosophies we have studied this semester to evaluate and clarify the story written by Roberta Clemente about the high school teacher from and ethical point of view rather than a legal point of view. (100 points) Due at the final. 



1.        Begin by briefly discussing the ethical conflicts that make this story a problem for the reporter.



2.       To introduce the issue of lying, let's say Roberta Clemente obtained her interview with the principal by telling him she was working on a positive story about Leslie Gore's accomplishments as a teacher. Your reaction should be based on Professor Bok's decision-making strategy? Does Kant have anything to say about this question? What about Aristotle?



3.        Issues of public vs. private persons are part of this scenario. Adapt Professor Bok and use John Rawls to draw the line here on whether you think the reporter ought to investigate this teacher's past and publish the results.



4.        How does this story raise issues of loyalty? Use Royce and Potter to thoroughly evaluate loyalties.



5.        Your key question should be whether or not to write the story this way and your answer should constitute most of the paper. Be specific about this: Your opinions are important and respected, but the real question here is your ability to manipulate the material from class to clarify an ethical question. In other words, which ideas we've studied this semester would persuade you in this particular case?  



Hint: One way to answer question five is to write about each philosopher one at a time clearly labeling each paragraph with the philosopher's name and clearly stating his or her ideas, then telling how you think they apply to the question of whether or not to write the story and, or, whether to write the story the way it is written. Include at least these philosophers and/or ideas: Bok, Aristotle, Kant, Potter, Royce, Rawls, Utilitarianism



If one philosopher or philosophy doesn't apply to this case, specifically tell why.






Criteria for evaluation of your paper:



·         Understanding (accuracy) of description of philosophies and concepts 



·         Application of each philosophy to this specific case 



·         Discussion of lying to get this story 



·         Discussion of the tension between public vs. private people in this case 



·         Discussion of loyalty in  this case 



·         Support from the material we have studied for your positions on the case; quality of citations 



·         General depth of your answer (Is your answer comprehensive? Does it show understanding? Does a theme emerge in your answer?)  



·         How many philosophers did you use successfully? 



·         Clarity of writing 



Be aware I will not be evaluating your answer based on whether I think your decision is right or wrong. The evaluation will be based on how you use the materials to reach an answer. 



Core Competency: 



The core competency for CA 302: Communication Ethics and Law will be a four-page reaction paper. The paper will follow a mock libel trial the final week of class. Students will be assigned roles in the trial (example attached), including a reporter, an editor, two attorneys, a libeled party and a jury. The heart of the trial will be a news article; the article will test these issues: 



·         Defamation


·         Privacy


·         Public vs. private citizens


·         Good journalistic practice


·         Truth


·         Fair comment


·         Privilege


·         Lying to obtain information


·         Objectivity


·         Loyalty


·         The role of the communicator in society 



A separate in-class examination will evaluate the libel issues. The core competency will take the issues raised in the mock trial and ask students to analyze the story used in the mock trial from an ethical perspective, not a legal perspective. The reaction paper will ask students to utilize each philosopher or philosophy examined in the course to analyze the story. Example questions: Would you write this story? Would you write this story this way? How would these philosophers or philosophies urge you to change this story or the method you used to get this story to make it more ethical? 



The goal is to put the student in a position to internalize the assignment, imagining herself in the writer's shoes, guided by the philosophical principles examined across the entire course. 



Core Competency (syllabus description): 



“The core competency will be a four-page reaction paper analyzing the story used in the mock libel trial from an ethical perspective, not a legal perspective. Students will utilize each philosopher or philosophy examined in the course to analyze the story. Example approaches: Would you write this story? Would you write this story this way? How would these philosophers or philosophies urge you to change this story or the method you used to get this story to make it more ethical? 



“The goal of the core competency reaction paper is for the student to internalize the assignment, imagining herself in the writer's shoes, guided by the philosophical principles examined across the entire course.”

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Assessment of student learning in this course will be based on class Participation/Discussion, two Essay Exams, one Individual Presentation, one Mock Trial, and one four-page Reaction Paper regarding the mock trial.

Grading:

Class Participation/Discussion – 80 points total: 10 points for each of 8 class sessions. (33 percent of final grade)
This includes being continually present from the start of class until the class is dismissed by the instructor. The instructor for this course does not allow ANY excused absences. All absences will be considered UNEXCUSED regardless of reason. With one absence, an A for the course is still possible; with two absences, a C for the course is still possible. Three absences will result in a grade of F for the course. This course will feature role-playing, skill-developing exercises, and class discussions to illustrate concepts and techniques while allowing students the opportunity to experience and develop concrete expressions of that knowledge. It is vital for all students to participate in these. Consideration will be given to quantity and quality of involvement, and demonstrated attitude toward learning. Students are expected to be respectful toward each other as well as the instructor, and to keep any personal information revealed during the class confidential. Part of participation is listening. A student who is daydreaming, reading a magazine, and/or chatting with friends about the weekend, etc., rather than paying attention to what is happening in class, is not participating.

Essay Exams – 40 points total: 20 points for each of two exams. (each exam is 6.5 percent of final grade)
Essay Exam One, for Session 4, will give students an opportunity to begin developing an awareness of their personal creed, or philosophy of life. Essay Exam Two, for Session 6, will provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate their ability to apply their knowledge to a particular case. In grading these, the instructor will take into account not only the choices made, but also the justifications for them, and the step-by-step thought process the student goes through in making them.

Individual Presentation – 40 points (16.5 percent of final grade)
The presentation will involve going over a case study and leading a brief class discussion of the ethical/legal challenges and considerations involved in making a sound ethical decision. The Individual Presentation should last at least 30 minutes. Topics and dates will be assigned during Session 3. Presentations will be given during Sessions 4 through 8.
- Mock Trial - 40 points  (16.5 percent of final grade)
The class will engage in a mock trial, with students playing various roles. Information about the case will be given during Session 6, with students expected to use this information to prepare for the mock trial, which is to be conducted during Session 7.
- Reaction Paper – 50 points (20 percent of final grade) The reaction paper is the core assessment for this course. In the paper,students are to examine the issues raised in the mock trial and  analyze the case used in the mock trial from an ethical perspective rather than a legal one. In the reaction paper, students will utilize each philosopher or philosophy examined in the course to analyze the case. Example questions: Would you write this story? Would you write this story this way? How would these philosophers or philosophies urge you to change this story or the method you used to get this story to make it more ethical? The goal is to put the student in a position to internalize the assignment, imagining herself in the writer’s shoes, guided by the philosophical principles examined across the entire course.

GRADING SCALE: 250 Possible Points
225-250 points = A (90-100%)
200-224-points = B (80-89%)
175-199 points = C (70-79%)
150-174 points = D (60-69%)
0-143 points = F (0-59%)                    

Late Submission of Course Materials:
The instructor will not accept late assignments. In fact, in the event that a student cannot come to class, they are still expected to turn in any written assignments on time. Assignments not submitted on the due date and time will receive a grade of “zero”. Students have several options for turning in assignments:
1. Turn them in at the beginning of the class on the due date.
2. Place them in the instructor’s message folder on or before the start of class on the due date. The faculty message folders are to the left of the copy machine in the Independence Campus office.
3. E-mail them to the instructor on or before the start of class on the due date. It is best to send them to both of the instructor’s e-mail addresses, and use a reliable computer.
4. Send assignments to the instructor at: Lynn Marie Norris, Park University Independence Campus, 2200 S. 291 Hwy., Independence, MO 64057. Assignments must be postmarked on or before the due date to be considered on time. Please note: Having a printer problem is not an excuse for late assignments. Students can have assignments printed at one of the Park campus computer labs or a copy center such as Kinko’s, or e-mail them to the instructor.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

1. Pirate mail is the official channel of communication for all Park students. Thus, the instructor will occasionally contact students via their Park accounts to notify them of schedule changes, assignments, and other important information related to the class. All students are responsible for checking their Park e-mail accounts regularly, thus they are considered by the instructor to be informed, and expected to properly utilize the information provided and be prepared for class.  Ignorance is not an excuse.

2. During class, all communication devices, such as mobile phones and pagers, must be turned off or set on silent. If you must answer a call, please leave the room as quietly as possible so as not to disrupt the class. If you are participating in an exercise, turn phones & pagers off.

3. Many of the ethical/legal discussion topics to be discussed in this class are controversial. Class members are asked to be open-minded and understanding, and to show respect and tolerance toward each others’ personal values and beliefs.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Note: Reading assignments should be read prior to the class period for which they are listed.

Session 1: Introduction to Ethics; What Are Your Personal Values?
-Read Chapter One

Session 2: Ethics and Society; Requirements For A System Of Ethics; What Are Your Personal Principles and Morals and How Do They Compare to Society’s?
-Read Chapter Two

Session 3: Ethics & Moral Reasoning; Using Case Studies; Developing Your Personal Creed
- Read Chapter Three
-Essay Exam One Review
-Individual Presentation
-Cases and Dates Assigned

Session 4: Essay Exam One Discussed; The Importance of Truth; The Value of Privacy
-Read Chapters Four & Five
-Due: Essay Exam One
-Due: Individual Presentations

Session 5: The Principle of Confidentiality; Conflicts of Interest
-Read Chapters Six & Seven
-Due: Individual Presentations
-Essay Exam Two Review

Session 6: Discussion of Essay Exam Two; Economic Interests Vs. Moral Obligation; The Media & Antisocial Behavior
-Read Chapters Eight & Nine
-Due: Essay Exam Two
-Due: Individual Presentations
-Mock Trial Review

Session 7: Discussion of Mock Trial; Morally Offensive Content; Media Content and Juveniles
-Read Chapters Ten & Eleven
-Due: Mock Trial
-Due: Individual Presentations
-Reaction Paper Review

Session 8: Discussion of Reaction Paper; Media Practitioners and Social Justice; Stereotypes in Media Communications
-Read Chapters Twelve & Thirteen
-Due: Reaction Paper
-Due: Individual Presentations
-Course Assessment Surveys

Schedule subject to change at the instructor’s discretion.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88
NOTE: The instructor for this course does not allow ANY excused absences. All absences will be considered UNEXCUSED regardless of reason. With one absence, an A for the course is still possible; with two absences, a C for the course is still possible. Three absences will result in a grade of F for the course.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Student applies all the major ideas examined in the course to the news article in question. Her application is specific to the news article and she is able to draw conclusions about the article or the reporting method using each of these ideas. Student applies some of the major ideas examined in the course to the news article in question. Her application is frequently specific to the news article and she is frequently able to draw conclusions about the article or the reporting method using each of these ideas. Student restates many of the major ideas examined in the course but does not apply them to the specific news article provided for the paper. The paper does not utilize the ideas of the course to answer the question. No citations are provided. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Student articulates the connection, or lack of connection, between each ethical principle examined in the course and the central elements of the mock news article provided for the reaction paper. Student articulates the connection, or lack of connection, between several ethical principle examined in the course and the central elements of the mock news article provided for the reaction paper. Student articulates the essence of each ethical principle examined across the course but does not apply them to the mock news article. The student does not provide evidence of understanding the principles of the course. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Student articulates a position on how the mock story should be assessed in terms of the ethical principles raised across the breadth of the course. The position is supported by evidence from several philosophical principles Student articulates a position on the ethical strength of the mock news article but does not support the position with principles raised in the course. Student analyzes the mock news article but does articulate a position on the ethical strength of the news article. The student does not approach the ethical issues raised by the article. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Student describes all philosophers and their ideas accurately. The paper is comprehensive in utilizing all the major points of the course. Student describes most philosophers and their ideas accurately. Inaccuracies still show modest understanding of the principles. Student demonstrates modest understanding of general principles but does not provide either a comprehensive discussion of them or the ability to match philosophers or ph8ilosophies to ideas. The student does not recognize the ethical issues involved in the article. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student utilizes the ideas to clarify the issues involved in the mock story. The student articulates the nature of the connection between the communicator and the community. The student utilizes the ideas to clarify the issues involved in the mock story The student describes some philosophical principles to the question but does not articulate the connection between communicator and community and does not utilize these ideas to clarify the issues involved in the mock story. The student does not deal with community connections or professional issues. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student articulates understanding of the existence of all expected ethical concerns about the mock story. The student articulates understanding of the existence of some expected ethical concerns about the mock story. The student articulates only a few ethical concerns raised by the story. The student does not deal with ethical issues raised by the story. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The student creates a comprehensive discussion of the principles, reaches conclusions and supports those conclusions. The student creates a discussion of some principles and utilizes those principles to reach conclusion about the mock story. The student demonstrates realization of some ethical problems with the story and uses at least one ethical principle from the course to approach it. The answer does not demonstrate processing of any ethical material or discussion from the course. 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The paper shows careful, clear writing, is thematic and organized in a matter that demonstrates thought about content. The paper shows careful, clear writing, is organized but does not appear to be guided by a general theme. The writing is adequate. The paper is not organized. The paper is unclear and not organized. 

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Last Updated:10/17/2007 7:34:42 PM