Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

HI 370 The American Indian
Broom, John T.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CourseHI 370 The American Indian
SemesterF2J2004
FacultyBroom, John T
TitleAdjunct Professor
Degrees/CertificatesPh.D.
Office LocationParkville Metro-Park Office
Office Hours4:30-5:30 on Class Nights
Daytime Phone816.584.6737
E-Maildocjohnb@pirate.park.edu
jtbhistoryphd@aol.com
Web Pagehttp://captain.kidd.edu/broom
Semester DatesMonday, October 25, 2004 - Sunday, December 19, 2004
Class Days---W---
Class Time5:30 - 9:50 PM
PerquisitesNone
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
• Hurtado and Iverson (ed.). Major Problems in American Indian History.
• Alvin M. Josephy 500 Nations : An Illustrated History of North American Indians
• Frederick E. Hoxie (ed) Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era
• N. Scott Momaday. The Way to Rainy Mountain.
• Colin Calloway (ed.). Our Hearts Fell to the Ground: Plains Indian Views of How the West Was Lost.

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Course Description:
Using Indian and white sources, this course attempts to reconstruct life in selected Indian tribes before the onslaught of the whites and studies the conflict between Native Americans and Euro-American cultures.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
My educational philosophy is based on interaction; built on lectures, readings, dialogues, examinations, internet, videos, web sites and writings.  I will engage each of you in what is referred to as disputatious learning to encourage the lively exploration of ideas, issues, and contradictions.

Learning Outcomes:
The primary goal of this course will be to provide students with an even balance of social, cultural, economic, and political history regarding Native Americans in North America. By objectively examining the social paradigms of the past, we can better understand the world as we know it today, understand ourselves better, and make wise choices in the future.
Critical Literacy: demonstrate skill in critical thinking through evaluation of historical interpretations and myths, which direct popular conceptions through the weekly reading précis, course examinations and research paper.
Civic Literacy: demonstrate insight into American social and political systems and into ways for contributing to responsible citizen participatory solutions through course discussions, examinations and the research paper.
Values Literacy: demonstrate skill in evaluating changing social norms and their historical effects through course discussion, examination, reading précis and research paper.
Aesthetic Literacy: demonstrate insight into the interplay of artistic interpretation with social conflict, technological and ethical questioning through the course discussion, reading précis, examinations and research paper.

Course Assessment:
Course assessment will be based on the following assignments:
Two examinations which will consist of brief identifications and Three 3-5 paragraph essay questions.  
Reading précis and classroom discussion.  A two page issue paper is due weeks, 2,3,4,6 and 7.  The issue papers serves two purposes, it insures that the student has completed the reading while clarifying their own thinking on the subject and to facilitate the week's discussion. The issue paper topics are listed for each week on the course schedule.  The issue paper should be a minimum of two pages and a maximum of three pages typed and double spaced in 12 pt Time New Roman print.
An essential part of the course is in class discussion, I do not lecture in the traditional sense. I will talk and ask questions. The Issue papers are an essential part of your preparation for each class. When I ask a question in class you should be able to use a combination of knowledge gained from the readings, your experience and awareness of the world around you, and logic to answer the question and in fact lead others to make additional comments. If you have questions, which I am not addressing, please feel free to ask them.  I may ask to hold them for a while we finish another topic, but your questions matter to my and I will do my best to answer them.  Your opinions matter as well. History is much more than merely facts; it is an interpretation of facts, an opinion about those facts. While a historian's opinions may be informed by a wide knowledge of history, the only way they reached that point was by study and by voicing their opinion along the way. A spirited but civil discussion about the topics and issues raised in class is my goal.  
A research paper of at least 10 pages and not more than 20 pages.  A significant aspect of learning is to perform the task or function being studied. History is more than a (useless) simple list of names and dates. It is a means of analyzing why and how things happen. You will learn by "doing" history through an outside written assignment. The outside written assignment is a typed 10-12 page research paper in 12 pt New Times Roman typeface. You must use at least 5 outside sources, in addition to 5 books and/or articles you may use Internet sources (Internet sources will be properly documented and may not be anonymous websites). The paper will examine a critical question in Native American History between 1500 and 1990. This is an argumentative/persuasive research paper analysing and synthesizing information to come to a conclusion. A research paper implies the use of citation from other authors and sources, to document specific items of fact not commonly known, document your incorporation of other's ideas (their intellectual property) and to lend authority from other scholars in support of your assertions. Therefore the failure to properly cite either with parenthetical notes (MLA) or footnotes (University of Chicago) will result in an automatic failing grade on your research paper. Please consistently use either MLA/APA or University of Chicago style for format, documentation (footnotes), and bibliography or works cited. The Park University standard is the MLA format, however within the history field the University of Chicago style is the accepted format and I will accept either format. Additional guidance on specifically how and when to cite and prepare the documentation can be obtained through any of a number of style guides available in the library. Please notice on the schedule the dates for topic turn-in, source list, outline turn-in and final product turn-in. Late turn-in of the research paper or its components will result in a grade reduction.  If you have any questions about this assignment that we do not cover in class, please do no hesitate to see me.  

Grading:
50%  --  25% each  --  Two examinations
30% Issue Papers and regular class discussion based on the reading assignments.  
20% A research paper of 10 pages on a historical topic approved in advance by the instructor.
90-100%  = A
80- 89%  = B
70- 79%  = C
60- 69%  = D
 0- 59%  = F

A is exceptional and an uncommon achievement.  B is above the average performance of a 1st or 2nd year college student and is earned by exceeding the standard.  C is the average expected of a 1st or 2nd year student and is earned by meeting the standard.  D is below average and marginally meets the course standard.   F is obviously failing to meet the course standard and is usually only given to a student wanting an F.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Assignments not submitted on the due date will receive a grade one full letter grade below the scored grade unless prior approval has been coordinated and approved with the instructor.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive.  Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems.  Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.  Cell phones and pagers are very distracting and shall be turned off prior to class, if your cell phone or pager goes off during class, I will confiscate it and turn it in to the Parkville Metropark office where you can collect it and explain to the director why your phone messages are more important than your weekly 4 hours of instruction.

 Class ActivitiesAssignmentsTests
10/27Course Introduction, Overview, and Introduction to Each Other
Discussion of the book The Way to Rainy Mountain (have this read before class).
Discussion of chapter 1 “Interpreting the Indian Past,” in Major Problems in American Indian History, (hereafter referred to as Major Problems) edited by Huarto and Iverson
ESSAYS (Have these read before class)
• Donald L. Fixico, Ethics and Responsibilities in Writing American Indian History
• Richard White, Indian Peoples and the Natural World: Asking the Right
Discussion of Chapter 1 in 500 Nations
Discussion of chapter 2, “Indian History Before Columbus,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS  
1. A Pueblo Song of the Sky Loom, n.d.  
2. Maidu Account of the Beginning of the World, n.d.
3. A Skagit Belief About the Origins of the World, n.d.
4. The Arikaras Describe Their Origins, n.d.
5. The Iroquois Depict the World on the Turtle's Back, n.d.  
ESSAYS
• Neal Salisbury, The Indians' Old World: Native Americans and the Coming of Europeans  
• Stephen Plog, Towns, Mounds, and Kachinas
  
11/3Discussion of Chapters 2 and 3 in 500 Nations
Discussion of chapter 3, “Indians and Europeans Meet,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Columbus on the Indians' "Discovery" of the Spanish, 1492  
2. Spain Requires the Indians to Submit to Spanish Authority, 1513
3. Augustín Rodríguez Describes the Rio Grande Pueblos, 1581-1582
4. Jacques Cartier on the Micmacs Meeting the French, 1534  
5. Powhatan Speaks to Captain John Smith, 1609 6. William Bradford - Samoset, Squanto, Massasoit, & the Pilgrims 1620
6. ESSAYS •?Bruce G. Trigger, Early Native North American Responses to European Contact •?James H. Merrell, The Indians' New World: The Catawba Experience

Discussion of chapter 4, “The Southern Borderlands,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Pedro Naranjo's (Keresan Pueblo) Explanation of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, 1681  
2. Juan (Tiwa Pueblo) Explains the Pueblo Revolt, 1681  
3. A Luiseño Recollection of Mission Life, 1835  
4. A Costanoan Account of the Murder of a Missionary, 1812  
ESSAYS
? Stefanie Beninato, Popé, Pose-yemu, and Naranjo: A New Look at Leadership in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680
? Steven W. Hackel, The Staff of Leadership: Indian Authority in the Missions of Alta California
  
11/10Discussion of possible research topics
Discussion of Chapter 4 in 500 Nations
Discussion of Chapter 5, “The Northern Borderlands,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Joseph Fish Preaches to the Narragansett Indians, 1768  
2. Samson Occom (Mohegan) Gives a Short Narrative of His Life, 1768  
3. Christien LeClerq (Micmac) Responds to the French, 1677
4. J. B. Truteau's Description of Indian Women on the Upper Missouri, 1794  
5. James Sutherland Notes Canadian Traders Who Wish to Buy an Indian Slave, 1797
ESSAYS
• Sylvia Van Kirk, The Role of Native American Women in the Fur Trade Society of Western Canada, 1670-1830  
• Jean M. O'Brien (Ojibwe), Changing Conditions of Life for Indian Women in Eighteenth-Century New England
  
11/17Discussion of Chapters 5 and 6 in 500 Nations
Discussion of chapter 6, “New Nations, New Boundaries: American Revolution in Indian Country,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Speech of Congress to Visiting Iroquois Delegation, 1776  
2. Nathaniel Gist of Virginia Addresses Cherokee Chiefs, 1777  
3. Dragging Canoe (Cherokee) Replies to Nathaniel Gist, 1777  
4. Mary Jemison's (Seneca) Memory of the Revolution in Indian Country, 1775-1779  
5. Treaty of Fort Stanwix, 1784  
ESSAYS
• Colin Calloway, The Aftermath of the Revolution in Indian Country  
• Ruth Wallis Herndon and Ella Wilcox Sekatau (Narragansett), The Right to a Name: The Narragansett People and Rhode Island Officials in the Revolutionary Era  
Discussion of chapter 7, “Domestic Dependent Nations: Tribes in the New Republic,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Northwest Ordinance, 1787
2. Little Turtle (Miami) on the Treaty of Greenville, 1795
3. Tecumseh (Shawnee) Speaks Out Against Land Cessions, 1810
4. Indian Commissioner Thomas L. McKenney Explains Removal, 1828
5. Speckled Snake's (Cherokee) Reply to President Jackson, 1830
6. Cherokee Editor Elias Boudinot Opposes Removal, 1828
7. Pierre Chardon on Sex and Marriage with Indians on the Upper Missouri River, 1836-1839
8. Friederich Kurz Gives a Romantic View of Indian-White Love, 1849
ESSAYS
• Daniel H. Usner, Jr., American Indians on the Cotton Frontier
• Tanis Thorne, Multiple Marriages, Many Relations: Fur Trade Families on the Missouri River
 MID TERM EXAM distributed by e-mail and returned to instructor by Sunday
11/24Return and discussion of Midterm exams
One Page Term Paper Outlines Due
Discussion of chapter 8, “The Trans-Mississippi West Before 1860,” in Major Problems  
DOCUMENTS
1. Joseph Antonio Flores Describes the Comanche Destruction of the San Saba Mission in Texas, 1758  
2. A Spanish Official Gives an Analysis of Comanche Power, 1758  
3. Chief Sharitarish Foretells the End of the Pawnee Way of Life, 1822  
4. A California Law for the Government and Protection of the Indians, 1850
5. William Joseph (Nisenan) Describes the Gold Rush, c. 1849
6. An Indian Agent Describes Conditions in the California Mines, 1854  
ESSAYS
• Pekka Hämäläinen, The Western Comanche Trade Center: Rethinking the Plains Indian Trade System
• Albert L. Hurtado, Indian and White Households on the California Frontier, 1860  
Discussion of chapter 9, “Indian Perspectives on the Civil War,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Wabasha (Dakota) Explains How Nefarious Trading Practices Caused the 1862 Minnesota War, 1868
2. Letter from Sarah C. Watie (Cherokee) to Her Husband, Stand Watie, During the Civil War, 1863  
3. Letter from Stand Watie (Cherokee) to His Wife, Sarah Watie, 1863  
4. Act of Conscription, Chickasaw Nation, 1864  
5. Proclamation Ordering Conscription in the Chickasaw Nation, 1864  
6. Commissioner of Indian Affairs Dennis N. Cooley on the Consequences of the Civil War, 1865  
ESSAYS
• Ari Kelman, Deadly Currents: John Ross's Decision of 1861  
• Gary Clayton Anderson, Dakota Sioux Uprising, 1862
  
12/1Discussion of Our Hearts Fell to the Ground: Plains Indian Views of How the West Was Lost
Discussion of Chapter 7 in 500 Nations
Discussion of chapter 10, “Resistance and Transition, 1865-1886,” in Major Problems  
DOCUMENTS 1. Allen P. Slickpoo (Nez Perce) Reviews the Nez Perce War (1877), Recorded 1973 2. James Harris Guy (Chickasaw), "The White Man Wants the Indians' Home," 1878 3. Luther Standing Bear (Lakota) Recalls His Experiences at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879 4. Ace Daklugie, Charlie Smith, and Jasper Kanseah (Chiricahua Apaches) Remember Geronimo, n.d.
ESSAYS
• David D. Smits, Indian Scouts & Indian Allies in the Frontier Army
• Tracy Neal Leavelle, "We Will Make It Our Own Place": Agriculture and Adaptation at the Grande Ronde Reservation, 1856-1887  
Discussion of chapter 11, “Restrictions and Renewals, 1887-1928,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. The General Allotment Act (Dawes Act) of 1887  
2. Cherokee Delegates Defend Their Land and Institutions, 1895
3. The U.S. Supreme Court Supports Indian Water Rights: Winters v. United States, 1908  
4. James Mooney and Francis La Fleschè (Omaha) Testify About Peyote, 1918
5. Carlos Montezuma (Yavapai) on Indian Service in World War I and the Ongoing Struggle for Freedom and Citizenship, 1919  
ESSAYS
• Brenda Child (Ojibwe), Ojibwe Children and Boarding Schools
• Frederick E. Hoxie, Crow Families in Transition
  
12/8Discussion of Chapter 8 in 500 Nations
Discussion of Talking Back to Civilization
Discussion of chapter 12, “Efforts at Reform, 1928-1941,” in Major Problems  
DOCUMENTS
1. Lewis Meriam Summarizes the Problems Facing American Indians, 1928  
2. The Indian Reorganization Act (Wheeler-Howard Act), 1934
3. Rupert Costo (Cahuilla) Condemns the Indian New Deal, 1986  
4. Ben Reifel (Brule Lakota) Praises the Legacy of John Collier, 1986  
ESSAYS
• John R. Finger, The Eastern Cherokees and the New Deal  
• D'Arcy McNickle (Salish-Kutenai), The Indian New Deal as Mirror of the Future  
Discussion of chapter 13, “World War II, Termination, and the Foundation for Self-Determination, 1914-1960,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Ella Deloria (Yankton Dakota) on Indian Experiences During World War II, 1944  
2. Ruth Muskrat Bronson (Cherokee) Criticizes the Proposed Termination of Federal Trusteeship, 1955  
3. John Wooden Legs (Northern Cheyenne) Outlines the Fight to Save the Land, 1960  
4. Mary Jacobs (Lumbee) Relates How Her Family Made a Home in Chicago, n.d.  
ESSAYS
• Harry A. Kersey, Jr., The Florida Seminoles Confront Termination  
• Peter Iverson, Building Toward Self-Determination: Plains and Southwestern Indians in the 1940s and 1950s
TERM PAPERS DUE 
12/15Discussion of The Way to Rainy Mountain
Discussion of chapter 14, “Taking Control of Lives and Lands, 1961-1980,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Clyde Warrior (Ponca) Delineates Five Types of Indians, 1965  
2. A Proclamation by the Indians of All Tribes, Alcatraz Island, 1969  
3. The Native Alaskan Land Speaks, 1969  
4. Ada Deer (Menominee) Explains How Her People Overturned Termination, 1974  
ESSAYS
• Laurence M. Hauptman and Jack Campisi, Eastern Indian Communities Strive for Recognition  
• Troy R. Johnson, The Roots of Contemporary Native American Activism  
Discussion of chapter 15, “Continuing Challenges, Continuing Peoples, 1981-1999,” in Major Problems
DOCUMENTS
1. Philip Martin (Choctaw) Discusses the Challenges of Economic Development, 1988  
2. James Riding In Presents a Pawnee Perspective on Repatriation, 1996  
3. Charlene Teters (Spokane) Asks "Whose History Do We Celebrate?" 1998  
4. Ben Winton (Yaqui) Delineates the Significance of the Mashuntucket Pequot Museum, 1998  
5. Liz Dominguez (Chumash/Yokuts/Luiseño) Hears Ishi's Voice, 1998  
ESSAYS
• Steve Larese, Contemporary Indian Economies in New Mexico  
• Arvo Quoetone Mikkanen (Kiowa-Comanche), Coming Home  
• Angela Cavender Wilson (Wahpatonwan Dakota), Grandmother to Granddaughter: Generations of Oral History in a Dakota Family  
 FINAL EXAM  -- to be returned by e-mail NLT Sunday Dec 19

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101
“Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments.  Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101
Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one's original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance.  Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100


In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.