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SO 220 Ethical Iss. in Social Sci.
Payne, Kevin Joe


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

SO 220 Ethical Issues in Social Science

Semester

S1T 2008 DL

Faculty

Payne, Kevin Joe

Title

Assistant Professor & Program Coordinator of Sociology

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D. -- University of Missouri-Columbia

Office Location

208B Maybee Learning Center ("The Underground")

Office Hours

7:45-8:45 AM & 10:00-12:00 TR

Daytime Phone

816-586-6556

E-Mail

kevin.payne@park.edu

Semester Dates

Monday 14 JAN 2008 - Sunday 09 MAR 2008

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

An introductory social science class (i.e., SO141, PS101, CJ100, or SW205).

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
ALL REQUIRED (the final six are tiny pocket guides at $4-6 each)

Israel & Hay  Research Ethics for Social Scientists, (2006). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.  ISBN-13:  9781412903905

Paul & Elder The Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking: Concepts and Tools, 2004, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN:  0944583105

Paul & Elder The Miniature Guide to Analytic Thinking, 2003, Dillion Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN: 0944583199

Paul & Elder The Miniature Guide to Taking Charge of the Human Mind, 2002, The Miniature Guide to Taking Charge of the Human Mind, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN:  0944583148

Paul & Elder The Miniature Guide to Scientific Thinking, 2003, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN:  0944583180

Paul & Elder The Thinker's Guide to Ethical Reasoning, 2003, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN:  0944583172

Paul & Elder The Thinker's Guide to Critical & Creative Thinking, 2004, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking, Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.  ISBN:  0944583261

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
Considers the moral and ethical consequences of conducting social science research. Disseminating the results, and implementing practices and policies based on those findings. Critically examines those questions and choices rising at each stage of the research process, and the results of those choices on relevant parties. 3:0:3 Prerequisite: and introductory social science course (i.e., SO 141, PS101)

Educational Philosophy:
For the remainder of this term, this class is your job.  And my job is to help you succeed at your job.  Learning is work, but it can be the most enjoyable and rewarding of jobs if we let it.  Online learning requires a high degree of motivation and commitment, and we must all be involved for a successful class.  To succeed in this class, you should do what you would to succeed at any job: take your job seriously, work hard, enjoy your work, do your own work, come to work when you’re expected and on time, come to work prepared, ask questions when you are unsure of your job, be a good colleague by helping others to do their jobs well and acknowledging others’ contributions to your work, and demonstrate your mastery of the job through learning the necessary tools and using them consistently, well, and creatively.

And what is your job in this class?  At the most basic, it is to know and understand the facts, issues, perspectives, methods of inquiry, and applications we will study.  But it is also much more than that.  These are simply the “tools of the trade,” and you must then use them in your work.  Real learning is not rote memorization or parroting back the answer you think I will approve.  Real learning is an effortful and interactive process that keeps you engaged with the material, your student colleagues, outside sources, and me.  Real learning requires you to think rigorously, empirically, critically, and creatively.  It demands evidence of your work as you learn to communicate you mastery properly, clearly, directly, and actively to a variety of well-defined audiences.  It requires that you impart your own contributions by analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating, applying, and otherwise using it.  And it clearly demonstrates your effort and growth.  I will grade you on your evidenced contributions to our job.

I often employ the “Socratic Method” and play “Devil’s Advocate” in class discussions, taking contrary positions and pushing you to explore your positions with a variety of questions.  I will ask tough questions, and I expect the same from you.  I expect you to be able to defend your assertions with sound reason and appropriate evidence.  Social science is not opinion.  In fact, it is often about getting over what you thought you knew.  You should be prepared to evidence a positively critical stance toward yourself and positions to which you adhere, other students’ perspectives, the readings, and even toward me.  But critical thinking does not imply intractability or contrarianism.  If you agree with something, you should be able to explain why, and you should still be open to the limitations of any perspective.  If you disagree, you should also be able to explain why, and be prepared to offer and defend what you feel to be a better alternative.  Sociology classes often explore emotionally charged topics that generate a great deal of controversy.  It is good to remember that others have thought deeply and conscientiously on these matters and reached conclusions with which you will differ.  We can respectfully disagree with one another and refrain from personal attacks, but we can and should hold one another to the highest standards of reason and scientific evidence.

Each of us has different strengths and weaknesses, and any one method of assessment with advantage some and disadvantage others.  Therefore, I attempt to incorporate several different sources for grades in order to measure different forms of learning and aptitude (as per Gardner,1983 & 1993, for example).  Typically, this means that a class will include several grading opportunities selected from essays, projects, discussion, participation and quizzes or tests.

The social sciences are messy and full of contention and debate.  I will not attempt to “clean it up” for you.  Instead, I will encourage you to develop the tools necessary to arrive at and defend your own perspectives through the careful application of appropriate reasons and evidence.  We will cover a great deal of material in this course.  I will relate as much relevant “state of the field” information that I can.  But social and demographic facts tend to change over the years and new research is always changing our understanding of self and society.  Social scientists often do not agree and it is more honest to present the material as such.  It also forces you to wrestle with the material and develop your own positions.  And that, I think, is the most important objective of this course: to present you with good data, influential theories, and effective methods through which you can better understand yourself and the changing world around you.  The social sciences are useful, no matter what you do for a living.  You have the capacity to contribute meaningfully to the very personal and public issues we study, and one goal of this class is to give you the tools and confidence necessary to become better involved in these issues that affect us all.

See attached file (2008rubric.pdf) for additional details.

Class Assessment:
Core Assessment:
Essay: (max. 2500 words, plus tables and figures) Students will be provided with two extended case studies and will write an essay comparing and critically evaluating their ethical challenges and the strategies used to minimize or guard against harmful results.  The essay must address the following issues:
1.    What ethical principles are at issue in each case?  Provide and justify specific examples.
2.    What strategies were used to insure the standards of ethical research?
3.    Were those strategies successful?  How and why?
4.    What alternate strategies might also have been used to achieve the same or better results?
5.    Which case study represents a better implementation of research ethics?  How and why?
Your essay will consist of a careful, point-by-point contrast of the two cases.  It should link the cases to commonly held standards of research ethics and discuss the extent to which those were followed.  You should discuss the ethical, practical, and political consequences of these cases for the researchers, participants, and the social groups represented therein.  And you should connect these cases to other examples of social research and implementation we have discussed.

Class Assessment:
Points    Assignment
200    Core Assessment (20%)
150    Comprehensive Final Examination (15%)
100    Complete Investigator Education Program (10%)
        http://cme.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/learning/humanparticipant-protections.asp

50    UA1: My Biases
50    UA2: Taking Sides
50    UA3: Literature Critique
50    UA4: Literature Search
50    UA5: Ethical Code Analysis
50    UA6: Ethical Issues Vignettes
50    UA7: Ethical Application
200    Participation (25 x 8)

Grading:

 Point Range
 Letter Grade
 >= 900
 A
 800 - 899
 B
 700 - 799
 C
 600 -699
 D
 < 600
 F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Late work is not accepted under any circumstances.  You should begin work on your assignments early enough to cope with those unforeseen circumstances that inevitably arise.  I may make accommodations for extreme circumstances, but you must discuss these with me as early as possible (beforehand, if possible, or immediately after the fact, in unforeseen circumstances).

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
The class is a professional environment and should be a safe place for everyone to explore the legitimate range of possible interpretations applicable to the relevant data.  Your contributions should be respectful and substantive.  Disagreements should center on the ideas, and not the individuals.  Violations of basic decorum will not be tolerated and will result in appropriate disciplinary actions.

See attached file (2008Rubric.pdf) for additional details.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

 WEEK TOPIC
READING
ASSIGNMENT
 1  1A Ethical Thinking: Problems & Principles
 "Taking Charge" & "Critical Thinking"
 UA1
 2  1B Ethical Thinking: Analysis & Critique
 "Analytical Thinking" & "Critical & Creative"
 UA2
 3  2A Ethical Building: Responsible Science
 "Ethical Reasoning" & "Scientific Thinking"
 UA3
 4  2B Ethical Building: Community of Science
 Israel & Hay, Ch. 1 & web resources
UA4 
 5  3A Ethical Research: Principles & Codes
 Israel & Hay, Ch. 2-4 & web resources
 UA5
 6  3B Ethical Research: Consent, Confidentiality & Harm
Israel & Hay, Ch. 5-7
 UA6
 7  4A Ethical Communication
 Israel & Hay, Ch. 8 & 9
 UA7
 8  4B Ethical Application
 web resources
 UA8, CA, Final

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86


See attached file (2008Rubric.pdf) for additional details.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85


See attached file (2008Rubric.pdf) for additional details.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
2008 Rubric & Additional Information

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:1/5/2008 5:59:54 PM